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Linoleum Block Printing

This Prezi explains the basic linoleum block printing process.
by

Christine Gerace

on 3 May 2016

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Transcript of Linoleum Block Printing

Linoleum Block Printing
Supplies:
Linoleum block
Image drawn or printed to size of
linoleum block
Graphite pencil
Cutting tools (gouges)
Bench hook/inking plate
Water base ink
Brayer (roller)
Baren or spoon
Printmaking paper
Once the image is approved-
Transfer image onto linoleum block
The image is in
pencil,
it can be directly transferred onto the block.
Place the image pencil
side down.
With uniform pressure, rub the back of the image. The
pressure
applied will transfer the image.
Align graphite image to block and burnish to transfer image to block.
With linoleum block cutting tools, remove the
negative space
from the block.
PRINTING
When the block is completely cut, print the block on paper.
Apply ink to surface of block with a brayer.
Ink coating should be even and thin.
Place paper on top of the inked block and
burnish
evenly with a baren.
Peel paper slowly from block
to reveal printed image.
This is called an artist's
proof
.
Watch the printing demo for proper technique!
Apply ink to block
Burnish
Reveal printed image
Study artist's proof and recut block to fix problem areas, add detail, or alter image as desired.

You may have to wash the block off before
recarving
and reprinting.

You must end up with 3 well done prints to turn in.
Print an
edition
of 3 prints
Ink should be
uniform
on each print.
Prints should be free from smudges and fingerprints.
Printed images should be straight and
centered
on paper.
Prints should be signed and
numbered.
..1/3, 2/3, 3/3
Now that you see how the process works, create a cool design or image to cut and print.

NEED INSPIRATION?
http://home.insightbb.com/~j4lackey/GalleryNewPrints.html

http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?word=Linoleum%20block-printing&s=3&notword=&f=2
or
Google Image search: Linoleum Block Printing
How to carve,
tools,
and
safety!

Tools used
Keep your hands on the
opposite
side of the blade

Do not cut yourself!!
Cut
away from yourself
using even pressure.
Linoleum cutter
a tool with inter changeable
blades
Linoleum Printing
Know Your Gear:
Ink Roller
Brayer
Baren
Inking Plate
Block Printing Ink
You carve a
linoleum block
Select a picture you want to use.
DO YOUR HOMEWORK!!
Use worksheets provided for you to make a line drawing of that picture
Use the ink roller to spread the ink on the plate
Roll the ink onto the linoleum
Place the paper onto the linoleum
Use the baren
Slowly peel the paper off the linoleum.
Finished Products
Relief carving
Art I, II, III

Roller
used to either
apply
ink to a plate or
used to
press
paper to the plate in the final
printing process.
Tool used to carve linoleum, very sharp!!
Remove the
white
space slowly!

End
Carving
Presentation

Will not use
Will use blades numbered 1,2,3,4,5
BEGIN PRINTING PRESENTATION
TAKE YOUR TIME!! Many mistakes
cannot
be fixed!
#1 is the
smallest
cutter- used for just small areas such as eyes

#2 and #3 most common to use for
general
cutting

#4 and #5 use to remove only
large
spaces
Bench hook
Use the baren to
rub
along the back of your print. Use a
firm
pressure and try not to move the paper around.
For Art II
You must create two multi layered block prints requiring you to carve multiple plates.
A foreground plate and a background plate are needed. So you will do two separate final prints.


What I am looking for:
Styles of Cutting:
 Basic white line cutting: are carved lines that print white.

 Cross hatching: Creating tonal value by cross hatching (carving X like lines).

 Create tonal areas: Creating tonal value by cutting textures and patterns, like stippling (tiny dots).

Wavy lines
Swirls
Dotted lines
Adding lines that follow the contour of your drawings to create a more detailed print.
Needs more!
Good detail!
BACK TO ART I Intro
and
All Classes
General Overview

The areas that will be black on the plate are the areas not cut. So
DO NOT CUT THE PENCIL LINES!!
You will be cutting the spaces between the lines and shapes of your drawing.
Cut
out
from all corners!
Trace around lines
first
, then carve out center sections.
It is recommended that you leave a
border
on your tile but not required.
You can draw pictures that "border" objects.
Having no border can make it difficult to stabilize the print.
Instead of just having the fish, the rocks and seaweed add to the image. Adding some waves in the upper left hand corner would improve the image further.
Your image must be approved before carving!!
Background lines:
Swirls
Wavy
Dotted
Need more ideas??
Art III

You will do the same thing as Art II but you have the choice to create your prints on a larger block. This may require you to only create one print based on the size block you choose and the details of your carving.
Create an individual work!












However I am allowing another option
You will only be allowed this option if you have sufficent homework (research) and a detailed rough draft.
Why will you will only be allowed this option if you have sufficent homework (research) and a detailed rough draft.

Because many of you may end up using different size formats and mediums, I cannot efficiently help everyone in this large class unless I know exactly what you are trying to achieve.

You must present your homework to me and receive input as to whether I feel your selection of project is adequate. You will then create your detailed rough draft for approval.

Grading will be based on your success at recreating your rough draft.
The steps for creating a print and the safety concerns will be discussed in a future presentation where linoleum terminology will also be introduced and discussed.

Safety
and
Termonology
DO NOT GET ANY CERAMIC THINGS OUT!!

Leave items on the class shelves do not get glaze out, etc. yet!

We need to discuss your next projects first!
Full transcript