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TPCASSSTT Poetry Analysis

A presentation for 9th grade students on TPCASSSTT poetry analysis.
by

on 30 October 2013

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Transcript of TPCASSSTT Poetry Analysis

So What is TPCASSSSTT?
It's a METHOD for ANALYZING POETRY.
(Write that down)
TPCASSSSTT Stands for:
Title
Paraphrase
Connotation
Attitude
Shifts
Sounds
Syntax
Setting
Title
Theme
Number 1: Title
Think about the title before reading the poem.
A good title has two jobs: to introduce the poem and set the stage, and to act as the last line of the poem where it becomes more significant.
In other words, the title is the first line and the last line of the poem.
Number 2: Paraphrase
Make notes on the poem to translate it into your own words.
Notice the author's DICTION (word choice) as you paraphrase. Mark any diction that seems significant to the poem.
Pay special attention to adjectives.
Look up any words you don't know as you translate.
Number 3: Connotation
Most of the time, poems don't just have a LITERAL meaning, they have a CONNOTATIVE meaning. The poet conveys the connotative meaning through language.
Look for figurative language to help find connotation.
Annotate the poem for imagery, metaphors, similes, personification, symbolism, irony, and allusions. Make abstract associations to help you find meaning.
Number 6: Sounds
Annotate and make note of the SOUNDS in the poem.
Look for alliteration, consonance, repetition, onomatopoeia, rhyme, and assonance.
Number 5: Shifts
Notice shifts in the speaker's tone or in the subject matter of the poem.
Include noticeable contrasts in the poem such as loneliness vs. company, isolation vs. society, independence vs. dependence, love vs. hate, the unknown vs. the known.
Number 4: Attitude
What is the author's attitude called?
Figure out who the speaker in the poem is. Is it the author, or is the speaker a character in the poem?
If there is an author AND a speaker, try to figure out BOTH of their attitudes. They might be different.
Number 8: Setting
What is the setting of the poem?
Try to find the time of day, the season, the century.
Is it outdoors? Indoors? Is it in the city or the country?
Write down everything you know about the setting from the poem.
Number 9: Title (Again)
Examine the title again.
This time, after you've read the poem, you can look at the title in a new way.
Why did the author choose this title for this particular poem?
Number 10: Theme
What message is the poet trying to convey to the reader? What lesson should the reader learn? What is the "moral of the story?"
Tone!
Number 7: Syntax
Make note of the poem's structure.
Are the sentences long, short, choppy, frantic, smooth, simple, complicated, or easy to read?
Where are the line breaks? Do they break up sentences? Do they speed the reading up or slow it down?
Make note of the poetic form (we'll talk more about this later)
TPCASSSSTT!
Now! Review Time.
TPCASSSSTT Is...?
A Method for
Analyzing Poetry!

What does it stand for?
Title
Paraphrase
Connotation
Attitude
Shifts
Sound
Syntax
Setting
Title (Again)
Theme
Now you're a certified TPCASSSSTT
expert. Congratulations.

Poetry can
be appreciated
by people of
ALL AGES.

Just check out
this awesome kid
reading "The Eagle"
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

The Eagle
He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands;
Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls;
and like a thunderbolt he falls.
Created by Lisa Stine
Bryant High School
9th Grade English
Full transcript