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FTM

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by

Klancy Salas

on 17 March 2011

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Transcript of FTM

Klancy's
Farewell To Manzanar This book is about a family's journey through a time when life really wasn't fair. Japan had bombed Pearl Harbor and all people of Japanese decent was put into camps for "safety" purposes. This story is told by Jeanne Wakatsuki, the youngest sibling. She tells the story of what it was like to be Japanese during these times. "In December 1941 Papa's disappearance
didn't bother me nearly so much as the
world I soon found myself in."
pg.10 This sentence really caught my eye because there
Father who had vanished should have been a
priority, and if the world around her was
worse than losing your own father, people must
must have been really cruel. "... you see all them knotholes?.. you get them
covered up before breakfast. You get any more
sand in here... you have to eat it off the floor with
ketchup."
pg.25 I wouldn't want to live in a sand box
and I'm sure they didn't appreciate it
either. "The simple truth is the camp was no
more ready for us then we were ready
for it..."
pg.29 This passage is really sad because of how it shows how hard life was for them now. They were treated worse than dogs when they should've been treated like a human The start of World War 2 was not the climax of our life in Ocean Park..."
pg.56 INTENSE... World War two was a huge event in history especially at that time. World War two affected them almost as much as it would have if they were in Japan. "Mr. Wakatsuki if I have to repeat all these questions, we'lll be here forever..."
pg. 64 Papa was telling them the truth yet they didn't believe him, and the interrogator didn't even care if the answer was fact or fiction. "With Papa back our cubicle
was over flowing..."
pg 65 Living conditions were terrible and the
worst part was that not many Americans
cared. "Papa never said more than three or four sentencesto us about his nine months at Fort Lincoln..."
pg 72 "...someone yelled'Up against
the wall you Japs...'"
pg79 I would've been worried for my father
wondering if someone had torchered
him or worse. This would have made me very
angry because they are insulting
them not only by calling them a "jap"
but also by taking advantage of
them just because of something that
Japan did. Even though the AMERICAN
JAPANESE people had nothing to do with it. "Listen to me Woodrow... When a soldier goes to war he
must go believeing he's not
coming back..."
pg 82 I would be honored to be the Mother of a son
who believed this but also worried for him.
But life for him in the army may have been
better than Manzanar. "The answer began with a Supreme Court
ruling that December called Ex Parte Endo..."
pg 125 Is this going to be good news?.. How is there
life going to be now that they don't have to be detained in Manzanar.
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