Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Old Ironsides

No description
by

Lexy Harris

on 25 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Old Ironsides

Setting: Boston, MA and wartime

The poem "Old Ironsides" takes place in Boston, where author Oliver Wendell Holmes first reads about the destined fate of the Old Ironside. Holmes takes you back to the action of the ship during wartime to show the bravery and importance of the Constitution. Speaker of Poem: Could be author or anyone who admires the ship

The poem shows how noble and important the ship was, admiring it's strength in the battles it fought. It describes how the valiant battleship has been through so much, it's deck serving as a place where "the vanquished foe" knelt. The ship battles crashing waves and uses cannons to fight the enemy. "It is the province of knowledge to speak and it is the privilege of wisdom to listen." - Oliver Wendell Holmes About the poet:
descendent of the Puritan writer Anne Bradstreet
born into a respected Cambridge, Mass. family
briefly studied law, then went into medicine
known for being witty, using wordplay, and being friendly
his poem "Old Ironsides" helped save a famous battleship ("The Constitution") from being scrapped Emotions The poem conveys compassion and a sort of longing to save something important. The author describes the ship's beauty and importance. It shows how they feel strongly about saving the ship. He uses exclamation points at the end of each stanza for emphasis. He also adds strong words to deepen the poem. By: Oliver Wendell Holmes
Presented by: Lexy, Marleah, and Hanna Old Ironsides Alliteration: "And the waves were white below" (Line 12)

Assonance: "Her deck, once red with heroes' blood" (Line 9)

Onomatopoeia: "And burst the cannon's roar;" (Line 6) Senses:

Wendell uses the sense of sight throughout the entire poem. He describes the boat, the sea, and the weather outside. He uses vivid words in the poem to set the scene. "Her deck, once red with the heroes' blood, where knelt the vanquished foe, when winds were hurrying o'er the flood." Figurative Language Throughout the poem, the ship is referred to as "her" Personification Symbolism A major symbol in "Old Ironsides" is the Constitution which represented American freedom on the seas. Old Ironsides was the nickname of the most celebrated warship in history. The ship itself and the fight to save it can also be considered a symbol. The poem ultimately symbolizes the fight for something meaningful. N
E
E
D
S
I
N What does the poem really mean? This poem is a testament to how noble the ship was and all it did for it's country. The author is extremely against scrapping it and believes it should be saved. Rhyme Scheme:
A
B
C
B
D
E
F
E A
B
A
B
C
D
E
D A
B
C
B
D
E
F
E There is a rhyme pattern, although it isn't very consistent. For the most part, it consists of 4 line stanzas and follows the pattern ABCB. "The meteor of ocean air" (Line 7) Metaphor "When the winds were hurrying o'er the flood" (Line 11) Personification "The eagle of the sea!" (Line 16) Metaphor "Her thunders shook the mighty deep" (Line 19) Personification, Hyperbole "And there should be her grave" (Line 20) Metaphor "And many an eye has danced to see that banner in the sky..." "The meteor of the ocean air shall sweep the clouds no more." "No more shall feel the victor's tread," The entire meaning of the poem is distrust. Why would you want to scrap a boat that has been so loyal to the country? "Her thunders shook the mighty deep," The poem embodies innocence- the ship has done nothing but good and should not be torn apart. "Long has it waved high," the poem ended up saving the ship.
Full transcript