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Japan Worldview

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by

Justine S

on 14 June 2011

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Transcript of Japan Worldview

How did beliefs, values and knowledge shape the
worldview of Japan between 1600 and 1900? Social Systems During the Edo period there was a distinct social hierarchy
among the Japanese people. The social hierarchy consisted of
outcasts,women, merchants, artisans, peasants and samurai. THE EDO PERIOD Culture During the Edo period Japan's arts and culture flourished. The reason for this was that
there was no influence on these elements that were not strictly Japanese, as Japan was
isolated from the rest of the world. The Edo period was also a time where there was a great expansion in popular culture,
this included the formation of novels, films, animated works and stage plays. Haiku, a form
of poetry, was also introduced during the Edo period. Political & Economic Systems The Edo period was a time of a strong and independent economy
throughout Japan due to the long periods of stability & peace that was
created from not being influenced or conflicted by other nations.

Since Japan did not participate in trade with foreign countries, other than
China and the Dutch, most of Japan's money always went back into the country.

. The Edo period was a time of isolalation in Japan. The isolation led to many
factors. There was no exchange or warfare with foreign countries and no
influence from other countries regarding culture, knowledge or economy. For
the most part, Japan was a very peaceful place. There was a great development
of culture and economy during the Edo period. However there were several
conflicts as well along the way. 1615-1868 Unfortunately there was negative effects on the economy as well.
Peasants were overtaxed and Japan had little foreign trade, there
wasn't an abbundance of money or goods from other countries. The Meiji Period The arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry triggered the start of the Meiji period and the conclusion of Japans isolation. It also started the process of westernization. There were many major events thoughout the Meiji period including the Industrial Revolution, the signing of the 5 Charter Oath and the reigning of a new emperor. 1868-1912 Society was very peaceful during the edo period but they had
little freedom due to the strict rules of japanese government. Christianity did not exist in Japan at this time, Japan's religion consisted of confucianism,
buddhsim and Shinto. Culture Japan's culture changed with the arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry. As Japans society became more open, they gained influence of other countries values and their beliefs. Their culture was suddenly Westernized. Christianity was introduced at this time and the religions of Shinto & Buddhism were separated. Political & Economic The Industrial revolution occured in the Meiji period, a main reason for this
was the employment of over 3000 foreign experts. It changed Japans economy from being
one based off of agriculture and land to one with a great importance of businesses.
Japan also switched their currency from rice to a more modern currency of yen.
Japans economic system began to resemble systems used in Europe at the time (Renaissance era). It wasn't until Commodore Perry's arrival in 1858 where he forced the Shogun governmentto allow trade.
The Shogun eventually lost power because of his inability to govern properly. Emperor
Meiji became Japans new ruler and helped to transform the country from isolated to open society. How did the existing ideas and knowledge, as well as the discovery of
new ideas and knowledge affect the worldview of Japanese society? Social Systems Japan's social system underwent great changes with the arrival of Commodore Perry. When the charter of oath was granted the distinction between social classes was not so strong and those of the lower classes were given new rights. Women were also granted higher status. Japans school systems became based off of French and German school systems. More money began to go toward education, creating a spread of knowledge. The rulers in charge were the Shogun and the Bakufus. Japans
political system was a complex feudal system. Japan closed its doors by preventing foreign trade,
prohibiting travel abroad and visitors from outside
and by abolishing Christianity. Charter Oath Industrial Revolution Commodore Perry's Ships How did contact with other groups affect
the worldview of Japanese society? New religions were welcomed and international trade was permitted.
Business was a major focus in Japans economy The arrival of Commodore Perry brought many things: -End of isolation
-Opened ports to American ships & created international trade
-Supplies and goods from other countries
-New ideas & thoughts on government
-Charter Oath brought rights to commoners

-Beggining of mass production
-Production of steam engines off of miniature models
-Introduction of Western technology
-A new economic system similar to Europeans Commodore Perry Perry's first visit to Japan was in 1853 where he made demands
to the Japanese, who rejected and forced him to leave. He later
returned in 1854 and after much negotiation the Japanese gave
in and signed the Treaty of Kanagawa Treaty of Kanagawa The Treaty of Kanagawa guaranteed that the Japanese would save
any shipwrecked Americans and provide them with food, water, coal
and other neccesities. It also allowed for American ships to be docked
in Japanese Ports. By Justine Santema THE END EDO AND MEIJI JAPAN
WORLDVIEW
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