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Blisters

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by

Paola Romeo

on 19 April 2010

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Transcript of Blisters

BLISTERS DEFINITION
A local swelling of the skin that contains watery fluid and is caused by burning or irritation.
CAUSE
Blisters are a result of shearing forces acting on the skin. The fluid accumulates below the outer skin layer is also a cause; this fluid can be clear or bloody. Some main causes of blisters are from improperly fitted shoes (to much pressure, if to tight), abnormal foot function, and friction. Some other causes are excess sweating, allergies and seasonal changes. Blisters are also formed from certain medical conditions such as chicken pox, and herpes. Blisters form from an area being rubbed intensely.
PREVENTION
There are many ways you can prevent blisters from choosing a proper shoe, using orthotic devices if necessary, and correct taping devices. Simply even wearing 2 pairs of socks can help too. Some people like to wear a bandage called second skin. Applying a skin lubricant such as Vaseline can help protect against abnormal friction. You need to break in your shoes before wearing them for a long period of time to reduce your risk.
SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
-They can cause itching
-Clear liquid called serum collects between the gap
Early stage blister – skin on affected area is red
Mild, Middle Stage Blister – bubble-like swelling under the skin forms on the affected area. The fluid in the bubble-like swelling is clear.
Moderate or Severe, Middle Stage Blisters – bubble-like swelling under the skin forms in the affected area, and can be quite large. When blisters are infected, they are red around the outside and their fluid is red or pus-like; They are painful to touch and warm.
Late Stage Blisters – when blisters heal, the skin dries and naturally falls off eventually. The new skin is healthy.
TREATMENT
When a blister or hot spot arises, you can …
1)cover the irritated skin with a friction-proofing material(ex-skin lubricant)
2)cover the blister with an adhesive bandage
3)apply a doughnut pad that surrounds the blister
If it is more than 1cm in diameter and painful you may need to drain it.
-skin over and around should be cleansed with alcohol or betodine and a sterile needle or blade used to lance the blister
-followed by a topical antibiotic which is then covered with second skin or a ‘sandwich’ of Vaseline between 2 adhesive band aids.
•can become infected if not treated properly.

Caring for a Torn Blister
1)cleans the blister and surrounding tissue with soap and water; rinse with antiseptic
2)If the blister is open, drain the fluid using a sterile gauze pad
3)Apply antibiotic ointment under and around the loose skin; cover the area with a sterile dressing
4)Apply a doughnut pad around the blister
5)Change a dressing daily and check for signs of infection
6)Within 2 or 3 days, or when the underlying tissue has hardened sufficiently, remove the dead skin by trimming as close as possible to the perimeter of the blister
TREATMENT
When a blister or hot spot arises, you can …
1)cover the irritated skin with a friction-proofing material(ex-skin lubricant)
2)cover the blister with an adhesive bandage
3)apply a doughnut pad that surrounds the blister
If it is more than 1cm in diameter and painful you may need to drain it.
-skin over and around should be cleansed with alcohol or betodine and a sterile needle or blade used to lance the blister
-followed by a topical antibiotic which is then covered with second skin or a ‘sandwich’ of Vaseline between 2 adhesive band aids.
•can become infected if not treated properly.

Caring for a Torn Blister
1)cleans the blister and surrounding tissue with soap and water; rinse with antiseptic
2)If the blister is open, drain the fluid using a sterile gauze pad
3)Apply antibiotic ointment under and around the loose skin; cover the area with a sterile dressing
4)Apply a doughnut pad around the blister
5)Change a dressing daily and check for signs of infection
6)Within 2 or 3 days, or when the underlying tissue has hardened sufficiently, remove the dead skin by trimming as close as possible to the perimeter of the blister
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