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Architecture in the Gilded Age

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by

Diya Anand

on 16 September 2014

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Transcript of Architecture in the Gilded Age

Architecture in the Gilded Age
By: Beth LaMacchia, Callie Witt, and Diya Anand
The homes built by the wealthy captains of industry and commerce during the gilded age stand out from the great homes built prior to the civil war. They were designed by the nation's leading architects, including Richard Morris Hunt and the McKim, Mead, and White architectural firm.

Architecture in the Gilded Age
Mansions of the Wealthy
Architects in the Gilded Age
Skyscrapers in the Gilded Age
Louis Sullivan
Richard Morris Hunt
Famous Mansions
Louis Sullivan was the first modernist of his time. He was alive for 68 years. He was considered an outsider in the architectural world. Before his death, Sullivan published an autobiography that inspired generations of architects including his protege, Frank Lloyd Right.
Richard Morris Hunt (1827-1897)
Stanford White (1853-1906)
Charles Follen McKim (1847-1909)
William Rutherford Mead (1846-1928)
Charles Schwab Mansion
William A. Clark House
Beaux-Arts
Characteristics
Although the initial designs and interior decorations were influenced by European design, American architects also created a different blending of styles and added new innovations that reflected the growing technology of the Gilded Age.
The translation for Beaux-Arts is fine arts. This is a very rich and lavish style of ornamentation taught at L'ecole des Beaux Arts. It mainly refers to the American Renaissance period (1890-1920).
Cook county, Illinois hospital
The Newport "Cottages"
The Cornelius Vanderbilt II House
Carnegie Mansion
McKim, Mead and White
Ecole des Beaux-Arts
Bibliography
Newport, Rhode Island, was the summer vacation spot for elite and wealthy New York City families. They built grand summer homes, employing the most famous architects of the time including Richard Morris Hunt and McKim, Mead, and White.
The Breakers
"Architects and Artisans." | Thoughtful Design for a Sustainable World. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Sept. 2014. <http://architectsandartisans.com/>.

"Guilded Age." Region Culture. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2014. <http://dig.lib.niu.edu/guilded/regionculture.html>.

"Louis Sullivan." britannica. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2014. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/572949/louis-sullivan/6979>.

"Newport, Rhode Island." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 9 Oct. 2014. Web. 13 Sept. 2014.

Bear, Rob. "Manhattan's Lost Gilded Age Mansions." Curbed.com. 9 Feb. 2012. Web. 13 Sept. 2014.

"Characteristics of a Gilded Age Mansion." Artsedge. The Kennedy Center. Web. 13 Sept. 2014.

http://architecture.about.com/od/architectsaz/p/Hunt.htm

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/642073/Stanford-White

http://www.frenchmoments.eu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/SOLPedestalConstruction_1.jpg
Marble House
The Elms
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