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Poetry

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by

Dimitri Legg

on 22 April 2015

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Transcript of Poetry

Memorandum by Billie Bolton
To: My Boyfriend from Hell
Fr: Me
Re: S*** I Never Want to Hear Another Word About as Long as I Live

I
. Your added thoughts. Anything about your ongoing interest in Lucy Liu's legs, Shania Twain's bellybutton, or Reese Witherspoon's whatever; your must-see TV dramas, your fantasy baseball addiction, or your addictions period. Anything about going anywhere with you at any time including, but not limited to: Sam's Club, Big Lots, Waffle House, church fish fries, local snake round-ups or Amvet turkey shoots, unless you promise to be the turkey,

II
. Your wireless connection. Anything about your stage-four cell phone habit; the dames who have your cell phone number and why; who's on your speed-dial list or who left a voice mail message; anything about cell phone rebates, late fees, roaming charges, contracts or dropping your cell phone in the john by accident, even if you flush it and walk away.

III
. Your Adolescent Only Child. Anything about his bed-wetting or fire-setting habits; his gang affiliation, court dates or swastika tattoo; anything about his tantrums; seizures or deep psychological need for video games and fruit roll ups; anything about his pathological grudge against mankind or his particular beef against me.

IV
. Your Significant Others (female). Anything about the redneck redhead you banged in high school, the long-haired potheads you balled in your hippie days, the white trash airhead you married or the blue-haired battle-ax who pats you on the rump and pays for your dinner. Anything about your devotion to your long-suffering mother, your loopy sisters, or even the Blessed Virgin.
If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were loved by wife, then thee;
If ever wife was happy in a man,
Compare with me ye women if you can.
I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,
Or all the riches that the East doth hold.
My love is such that rivers cannot quench,
Nor ought but love from thee give recompense.
Thy love is such I can no way repay;
The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
Then while we live, in love let’s so persevere,
That when we live no more we may live ever.
"Since Feeling is First"
E.E Cummings
Annie Koo, Ashley Oviedo, Dimitri Legg, & Sarai Razo
Poetry
To My Dear and Loving Husband
By
Anne Bradstreet
I chose this because I love how their love for one another is great. I also like the fact that the poet describes her bond with her husband is infinite.
Chosen Reason
Use of Language/Figure of Speech
Images
Allegory
Irony
Symbol
Theme
Sound
Influence of Love
Dialect
Colloquial style
Personification of East hold
Metaphor of fire/recompense
Iambic Pentameter
Gold
East
Love
Prize
Love
Marriage
Death
Religion
Euphony
Rhyme
Anaphora
Alliteration
Love
Wealth
"Ever"
No irony
Compare and Contrast
Works Cited
Use of Language
Imagery
Figure of Speech
Allegory
Irony
Symbol
Theme
Sound
To My Dear
and Loving
Husband
Dialect
Colloquial style
Personification
Metaphor
Iambic Pentameter
Pun
Dialect
Colloquial style
Personification
Metaphor
Iambic Pentameter
Pun
No
Love
Wealth
"Ever"
No
Gold
East
Love
Prize
Love
Marriage
Death
Religion
Euphony
Rhyme
Anaphora
Alliteration
Since
Feeling
is First
since feeling is first
who pays any attention
to the syntax of things
will never wholly kiss you;

wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world

my blood approves,
and kisses are a better fate
than wisdom
lady i swear by all flowers. Don't cry
—the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids' flutter which says

we are for each other: then
laugh, leaning back in my arms
for life's not a paragraph

And death i think is no parenthesis
Reason For Selection
I chose this poem because it was the first poem I understood completely,and I loved the meaning of love I derived out of the poem.
Speaker?
Why?-->"eyelids flutter" (12)
Language
free verse
metaphor as punctuation
syntax= use of reason
Figures of Speech
Last two lines of the poem

for life's not a paragraph
And death's i think is no parenthesis (15-16)
Images/Symbols
the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids' flutter which says

we are for each other: then
laugh, leaning back in my arms (13-14)
Symbols are the punctuations
Ex:
And death
i
think is no parenthesis (16)
E.E Cummings/ a man
Theme
logic vs feeling
Sounds
Alliteration
Ex: will never wholly kiss you;
wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world (4-5)
Assonance
My interpretation
This poem is written to illustrate that love is meant to be lived through freely, and not set by any rules or how love should or shouldn't be.
metaphor
free verse
syntax
Yes
Comparison
love
life
No
Parenthesis
Punctuation
logic v.
feeling
Alliteration
Assonance
In "since feeling is first," the love depicted in this poem helped me as the reader comprehend that "life's not a paragraph," and that love should be treated with emotion/reaction rather than explaining through reasons why a couple should be together.
My Interprataion
I took this poem as a message of true real love. It is actually idealized but I think this poem shows us that this kind of love between couples can exist as long as they try their best and overcome obstacles.
For "To My Dear and Loving Husband'', this poem made me realize that love is a living emotion that people have for one another. It is like a plant that needs to be nurtured. By overcoming obstacles together, the love will grow to be strong and that would be rewarded with eternal love.
-Reason For Choosing:
I chose this poem because I felt as if though it was an interesting way in which the author chose to describe a former relationship with her former significant other.
-Speaker:
This poem is written in first poem
- Language:
by choosing specific diction the author allows the reader to feel the same sentiments or at least sympathize with how she feels.
Bolton starts each point with "Your"; making the reader understand that she is blaming him for much of their troubles/ annoyances.
- Sound:
"Cacophony"; although the words themselves are not cacophonous they emit and evoke emotion in a negative way.

Memorandum
Email
Colloquial
Humor
No
Comparisons

Past Love
Frustrations
Annoyances
Breaking
Up
"Cacophony"
Bolton, Bradley. "Memorandem."The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 9th Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.978. Print

Bradstreet, Anne. "To My Dear and Loving Husband."The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 9th Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.976. Print

Cummings, E.E. "Since Feeling is First."The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 9th Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.977. Print

Marlowe, Christopher. "The Passionate Shepherd to His love." The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 9th Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.974. Print

Shakespeare, William. "Nor Marble, Nor the Gilded Monuments"The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 9th Ed. Michael Meyer. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.975. Print

Shmoop Editorial Team. "To My Dear and Loving Husband Analysis." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 19 Apr. 2015. <http://www.shmoop.com/to-my-dear-loving-husband/analysis.html>.
The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe

Come live with me and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove,
That Valleys, groves, hills, and fields,
Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

And we will sit upon the Rocks,
Seeing the Shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow Rivers to whose falls
Melodious birds sing Madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of Roses
And a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroidered all with leaves of Myrtle;

A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty Lambs we pull;
Fair lined slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold;

A belt of straw and Ivy buds,
With Coral clasps and Amber studs:
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me, and be my love.

The Shepherds’ Swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May-morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me, and be my love.

Reason for Choosing:

I chose this poem this poem because of the overall innocent sounding language. The poem offers a deeper meaning within the many different pastoral images throughout its entirety.
Who's Speaking?
The speaker is a shepherd, trying to convince his love to come away and live with him.
Language:
Sensory Details: "A Cap of flowers, and a kirtle / Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle" (11-12)
Alliteration: "shepherd swains shall" (25), "mind may move" (27)
Rhyme: The first line rhymes with the second and the third line rhymes with the fourth. "Come live with me and be my love, / And we will all the pleasure prove / That valleys, groves, hills, and fields, / Woods, or steepy mountain yields." (1-4)
Figures of Speech:
Metaphor: "birds sing madrigals" (8)
The poem appeals to sight, sound, smell and touch.
Images/Symbols:
Nature: beauty of nature there to seduce the shepherds love
Rose: symbol of love, associated with the goddess of love
Music: lighthearted feel of the shepherd, appears literally and figuratively
My Interpretation:
The shepherd wants to offer everything he has and even things he does not own to be able to have his love come and be with him.
Themes:
Youth, innocence, love and beauty
The Passionate
Shepherd to His
Love
Metaphor
Alliteration
Sensory Detail

Yes
Metaphors
Sensory Details
Alliteration
Willing
to offer
anything
for love

Yes
Nature
Music
Roses
Youth
Innocence
Love
Beauty
Alliteration
End Rhyme
Euphony


The poem "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" shows how in some circumstances the power and influence of love makes individuals willing to do anything for the chance to have the one they desire to be with them.
"Nor Marble, Nor the Gilded Monuments"- William Shakespeare
Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone, besmear'd with sluttish time.
When wasteful war shall statues overturn,
And broils root out the work of masonry,
Nor Mars his sword nor war's quick fire shall burn
The living record of your memory.
'Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity
Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room
Even in the eyes of all posterity
That wear this world out to the ending doom.
So, till the judgment that yourself arise,
You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes.
Why I Chose This Poem
I chose this poem because the speaker is relatable to a lot of people due to his persistence on the love being indestructible.
Speaker?
The speaker is a man because I would assume that a man would have more educated symbols that are presented in this poem i.e Mars
Images
Symbols
Destruction
War
Death
Reason For Choosing:

gilded monuments of princes
Mars's swords=God of war
memory=living
Speaker:
This poem is written in first person
Sounds
Language:
by choosing specific diction the author allows the reader to feel the same sentiments or at least sympathize with how she feels.
Bolton starts each point with "Your"; making the reader understand that she is blaming him for much of their troubles/ annoyances.
Sound:
Rhyme (internal)
"And broils root out the work of masonry" (6)
Iambic pentameter
Alliteration
"Than unswept stone besmear'd with sluttish time" (4)
Assonance
"You live in this, and dwell in lovers' eyes" (14)
"Cacophony"; although the words themselves are not cacophonous they emit and evoke emotion in a negative way.
Theme
I chose this poem because I felt as if though it was an interesting way in which the author chose to describe a former relationship with her former significant other.
Theme:
Immoratality
Memory
Breaking Up with a significant other
-This poem can be viewed as relatable even under the light about venting one's frustrations towards another person if it is not sent to the other person.
Not marble, nor gilded monuments
metaphor
Yes
Comparisons
No
Mar's sword
memory
Immortality
Rhyme
Iambic Pentameter
Assonance
alliteration
Language
Metaphor
Ex: "Nor Mars his sword, nor war's quick fire shall burn / The living record of your memory." (7-8)
Relatable Nature:
Not Much
Full transcript