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Old Salem

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Michael Drennen

on 7 April 2013

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Transcript of Old Salem

Digital Exhibit for the Electronic Evidence 2
Civic and Governmental Ideal and Practices:
Almost from the very beginning, superior industry was the dominant reputation of Moravians in North Carolina. The combination of unified religious fervor and a Protestant work ethic enabled the Moravians to lay firm foundations for a town (Tilley, 2010).
Approximately 350 years before the Women’s Liberation movement, the town opened a school for girls almost a year before one for the boys (Findley, 1970). This school was highly successful and went on to become Salem Academy and then Salem College, a college still existing today (Hunter, 1977, p. 20). In fact, settling the infrastructure of work and worship in an internal system of guilds allowed the Moravians to engage better with neighboring communities in commerce and evangelism (Hunter, 1977). Personal Reflection:
Having the opportunity to research Old Salem has been a great learning experience. At the onset of this project I was excited to educate myself on a historical site so close to my home. The experience was more than I could have imagined as I gained lifelong information. Learning about the faith, perseverance and tenacity of the early Moravian settlers was truly inspirational. This project has motivated me to visit Old Salem with my children, so they too can have this educational experience.
References
Board, C.-C. P. (2012). www.cityofws.org. Winston Salem: City of Winston Salem county planning board.
Clewell, J. H. (1902). History of Wachovia in North Carolina. New York: Doubleday, Page and Co.
Diarist, M. (1766, February). http://www.oldsalem.org. Retrieved March 21, 2013, from http://www.oldsalem.org.
Findley, R. (1970, Dec). Old Salem Morning Star of Moravian Faith. National Geographic Vol 138 No 6 , pp. 818-837.
Graff, M. (2012, November). www.ourstate.com/old salem. Retrieved March 26, 2013, from www.ourstate.com.
Grube, B. A. (1753, November 17). http://www.cityofws.org/Home/Departments/RecreationAndParks/BethabaraPark/AboutBethabara/Articles/TheMoravianStory. Retrieved March 25, 2013, from www.cityofws.org.
Hunter, J. (1977). Old salem Offical Guidebook. Winston Salem: Hunter Publishing.
Leath, R. A. (2012). Http://www.oldsalem.org. Retrieved February 11, 2013, from www.oldsalem.org/historyabout: www.oldsalem.org
Powell, W. S. (2006). Salem. Encyclopedia of North Carolina , p. 998.
Sink, A. E. (2010, Spring 23). The Days of Old. Triad Living .
Spangenberg, A. G. (1753). The Moravian Story. Winston Salem: City of Winston Salem.
Taylor, J. H. (2010). Old Salem - A clolnial Moravian Village. In J. H. Taylor, A clolnial Moravian Village. Abingdon Press .
Tilley, N. (2010). Http://carolinahistory.web.unc.edu/old-salem-an-inner-foundation-and-an-outstretchingmision/. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from Carolinahistory.web.
Walbert, D. (2009). http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-antebellum/5314. Retrieved March 26, 2013, from www.learn.org.

Individuals, Groups and Institutions:
Though distressing from a twenty-first-century perspective, the early history of African-American segregation in the Salem community is interesting to recount.
Salem Moravians held African-American slaves until the end of the Civil War (Walbert, 2009). During the 18th century, however, they were true to the belief that even though individuals have different social duties and roles in this world, all Moravians are spiritually equal.
Hence, Moravian whites and blacks worshiped side-by-side and were buried side-by-side in the same God’s Acre, the Moravian cemetery (Walbert, 2009). Culture & Cultural Diversity:
The Moravian Church owns all the land; sets all the wages; determines where you live; how you live; and in most cases, whom you marry. You find comfort in this equality. When you die, you will be buried next to the person who most recently died before you, not your wife or your children, and your headstone will look like all of those around you, and it will face east, and you will rest here forever in a place you call God’s Acre (Graff, 2012). Economy, Scientific & Technology Development:
(Powell, 2006) states that, Salem soon emerged as “the economic center of the North Carolina backcountry” (Powell, 2006 p. 998).
Prior to the industrial boom, Old Salem was the hub of trade; having the professional skills and goods that were in high demand. The Moravians were very skilled in the technology of the times and accommodated the major requirements of the people during that era
The town of Winston was established just north of Salem as the new county’s seat and the town grew quickly, mainly due to the tobacco industry, eventually rivaling the textile industry in Salem (Powell, 2006) Time, Continuity and Change:
"The land on which we are now encamped seems to me to have been reserved by the Lord for the Brethren."
August Gottlieb Spangenberg. January 8, 1753 (Spangenberg, 1753).

The Land on which he speaks spawned the very city we stand upon today.
Essential Standard: 3.C&G.2 Understand how citizens participate in their communities.

Clarifying Objectives: 3.C&G.2.1 Exemplify how citizens contribute politically, socially and economically to their community.
3. C&G.2.2 Exemplify how citizens contribute to the well-being of the community’s natural environment.
The Story:
The story I want to tell is about the people who lived in Old Salem. What it was like during that time in history for all people in the community. We all can get the nickel tour of how they made horse shoes and candles but I want to go behind the scenes to give a true account of the daily lives of the residents as well as the people of the surrounding area. It is my belief that outlying areas of this prosperous hub are just as much responsible for its success as the community itself. It is in this perspective that I wish to direct my attention.
Rationale:
It is important to know about the area if which you live. This knowledge gives clarification to the culture and traditions of one’s environment. Old Salem is such a historical site to lend this information.
“What is the condition of the Moravian Church after the lapse of many years (Clewell, 1902, p. 296)?” His conclusion at the time was that the church had indeed remained faithful to its goal of cohesive Christian community and involved outreach in work, worship, and community. Religion was at the heart of the Moravian quest to settle this land and bringing the gospel to all who sought the word of God was a matter to which no persons were discriminated against. The first school in Forsyth County for African Americans was built in 1867 on land that belonged to the Moravian Church.
Elias A. Vogler, a long-time supporter of the African-American community, proposed building a neighborhood southeast of Salem, across Salem Creek, as a new settlement for African Americans. The area, named Liberia, became one of the first settlements in the South where freedmen could purchase land. The first lots in Liberia sold for $10.00 each. Today, the neighborhood is called Happy Hills Gardens (Walbert, 2009). Old Salem Michael Drennen Dr. Pemberton Winston Salem State University
4338 Methods & Assessment in Teaching Social Studies Spring 2013 References
Board, C.-C. P. (2012). www.cityofws.org. Winston Salem: City of Winston Salem county planning board.
Clewell, J. H. (1902). History of Wachovia in North Carolina. New York: Doubleday, Page and Co.
Diarist, M. (1766, February). http://www.oldsalem.org. Retrieved March 21, 2013, from http://www.oldsalem.org.
Findley, R. (1970, Dec). Old Salem Morning Star of Moravian Faith. National Geographic Vol 138 No 6 , pp. 818-837.
Graff, M. (2012, November). www.ourstate.com/old salem. Retrieved March 26, 2013, from www.ourstate.com.
Grube, B. A. (1753, November 17). http://www.cityofws.org/Home/Departments/RecreationAndParks/BethabaraPark/AboutBethabara/Articles/TheMoravianStory. Retrieved March 25, 2013, from www.cityofws.org.
Hunter, J. (1977). Old salem Offical Guidebook. Winston Salem: Hunter Publishing.
Leath, R. A. (2012). Http://www.oldsalem.org. Retrieved February 11, 2013, from www.oldsalem.org/historyabout: www.oldsalem.org
Powell, W. S. (2006). Salem. Encyclopedia of North Carolina , p. 998.
Sink, A. E. (2010, Spring 23). The Days of Old. Triad Living .
Spangenberg, A. G. (1753). The Moravian Story. Winston Salem: City of Winston Salem.
Taylor, J. H. (2010). Old Salem - A clolnial Moravian Village. In J. H. Taylor, A clolnial Moravian Village. Abingdon Press .
Tilley, N. (2010). Http://carolinahistory.web.unc.edu/old-salem-an-inner-foundation-and-an-outstretchingmision/. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from Carolinahistory.web.
Walbert, D. (2009). http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-antebellum/5314. Retrieved March 26, 2013, from www.learn.org.

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