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Gradual Release CR-B

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Brianna Schwenk

on 13 September 2013

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Transcript of Gradual Release CR-B

Adair-Casey CSD
September 2013
r

Gradual Release of Responsibility
Teaching Kids HOW to Think
Learning Goals
To understand…
the definition the Gradual Release of Responsibility instructional model.
the role of the Gradual Release of Responsibility instructional model in future lesson planning and classroom instruction.

Success criteria:
I can…
identify the four phases of the Gradual Release of Responsibility instructional model.
provide examples of incorporating the Gradual Release of Responsibility instructional model in specific lesson plans
In Some Classrooms....
Making Connections With Old Friends.....
Bloom's ?
Brain Research?
Differentiation?
Conceptual Learning?
Focus Lessons
Why Modeling?
"We inspire and develop all students to become responsible, life-long learners."
Research Shows That:
“The __________ influence on student achievement scores is twenty times greater than any other variable, including class size and student poverty.”
(Fallon, 2003)

Just “Getting the Job Done” is not enough.
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
A Model for Success for All Students
“You do it
alone”
Independent
Collaborative
“You do it
together”
“We do it”
“I do it”
Guided Instruction
Focus Lesson
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
“You do it
alone”
Independent
Focus Lesson
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
I'll Do It …
“I do it”
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual
release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
(none)
No….. “Do It Yourself” Classroom
“You do it
alone”
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual
release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
“You do it
alone”
Independent
“We do it”
“I do it”
Guided Instruction
Focus Lesson
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
The “Good Enough” Classroom
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
A Model for Success for All Students
“You do it
alone”
Independent
Collaborative
“You do it
together”
“We do it”
“I do it”
Guided Instruction
Focus Lesson
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
Purpose is clearly stated in every lesson but does NOT have to come first
Full class instruction—not differentiated
Mental Modeling—sharing thinking
Introduce the concept, skill, or strategy they are to learn
Focus Lesson - Defined
Focus Lesson – What they are NOT!
Establish purpose for the learning
Modeling thinking
Focus Lesson – key features
Modeling
Emphasizes cognition
“Teaching” not “Telling”
Direct explanation/Demonstration
Metacognitive Awareness
Think-Alouds

Uses Instructional level text

Usually starts in whole group and moves to small group

Differentiating instruction happens HERE
Strategic use of cues, prompts, or questions in teacher-guided instruction
GUIDED INSTRUCTION: DEFINED

NOT ability grouping

NOT prescriptive
Guided instruction– What it is NOT!

Follows the principles of scaffolding

Based on formative assessment

Allows for differentiation of content, process, and product
GUIDED instruction– key features
Guided Reading

Guided Writing

Student Think-Aloud

Misconception Analysis
Guided instruction – Instructional Strategies
Guided Instruction:
Connection between the modeled instruction and independent performance
High teacher demands - due to the need for frequent differentiation of content, process, or product
Is the phase where the art and science of teaching come together
Keywords: Cues, prompts, & questions
Guided instruction– Summary
Productive Group Work
ANOTHER good place to differentiate
EACH student is accountable to produce something based on the group instruction.
Collaborative/Cooperative tasks
COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: DEFINED

NOT the time to introduce new information
NOT simply “group work” in which a single product is produced for the group
NOT ability grouping
Collaborative learning – What it is NOT!

Positive interdependence
Face-to-face interaction
Individual and group accountability
Interpersonal and small-group skills
Group processing
Collaborative learning – key features
Reciprocal Teaching
Listening/Viewing Station
Visual Displays
Literature Circles/Book Clubs
Lab & Simulations
Jigsaw
Skills Practice
Collaborative learning – Instructional Strategies
Collaborative Learning:
Is the critical bridge in student learning – allows novice learners to refine their thinking about new concepts & skills
Requires the use of social and academic language
Individual accountability is a hallmark

Keywords: Consolidating thinking with peers
Collaborative learning – Summary
Enables individual learners to take
responsibility for their own learning
Is based on meaningful learning activities
Is both a goal AND a process
INDEPENDENT LEARNING: DEFINED

NOT just a “pile of worksheets”
NOT just an exercise in rote
memorization
NOT necessarily silent
Independent Learning – What it is NOT!

Allows student a “direct encounter with the phenomena being studied …(Borzak) ”
Theory of Experiential Learning (Kolb,1984)
Principles of Learning (Rogers, 1969)
Is not successful if it happens too early in the instructional process
independent learning – key features
SSR
Bellwork
Prompt on the board before class starts
Writing to Prompts
Entry/Exit Slips/Ticket Out
Homework
Practice of skills already learned
Conferring
independent learning – Instructional Strategies
Independent Learning :
Is the time when students fully assume the cognitive load of learning by applying what they have learned to novel tasks
Choice becomes a major feature
Incorporates both formative and summative assessments (Conferring with students)

Keywords: Not just “Do It Yourself School”
Independent learning – Summary
Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
A Model for Success for All Students
“You do it
alone”
Independent
Collaborative
“You do it
together”
“We do it”
“I do it”
Guided Instruction
Focus Lesson
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
NOT intended as a time to ask students questions
NOT a time to interrogate students about their thinking
Targets instructional needs
Provides feed forward instruction, not just feedback
Provides for Tier 2 (RTI2) supplemental intervention
Why Focus on
Guided Instruction?
Common Mistakes
During Guided Instruction
Are students accessing grade level standards?
Do students know what they are expected to learn, not just what they are expected to do?
How is instructional time used?
How does the teacher know when a learning goal has been met?
Why Focus on Purpose ?
Common Mistakes
When Establishing Purpose
Guided Instruction
Students must interact, using academic language, if they are to reach proficiency
Provides teachers time for small group guided instruction
Transfer of responsibility to students
Why Focus
on Collaborative Learning?
Common Mistakes
During Collaborative Learning
Include modeling and direct explanation of the skills, strategies, or tasks being taught which are…..Followed by teacher-led metacognitive awareness lessons resulting in…..Merging of cognitive and metacognitive processes through use of think-alouds
Why Focus
on Modeling?
Provides students with examples of the cognitive work they are expected to do
Provides students with academic language
Taps into innate ability to imitate or mimic others
Common Mistakes
When Modeling
Collaborative Learning
Independent Learning
A Pep Talk As You Start Your Own Gradual Release Plan
Full transcript