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Robert Louis Stevenson

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Shelby Davis

on 15 October 2012

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Transcript of Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1850. He spent most of his time as child in a "sick room" with his nurse Allison Cunningham, whom he later wrote and titled a poem after.


Stevenson went to college at the University of Edinburgh and began to study Civil Engineering so he could follow in his father and grandfather's footsteps of building lighthouses. It was there that he realized his lack of passion for engineering and found his passion for writing.

Unfortunately, he was ill most of his life and died in 1894 from a stroke after moving to Samoa while traveling the South Seas Stevenson loved to travel and spent a lot of his time in France. From his traveling, he was inspired by the people and places around him, thus two of his books were written upon his traveling, An Inland Voyage and Travels with Donkey in the Cevennes.

While traveling he met his Wife, Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne, and her two sons. Stevenson began to publish his workes in the mid 1870's. He is known for his Novels and Poetry. His most famous Novels are Treasure Island and Dr. Jekyell and Mr. Hyde. His most famous book of Children's poetry is A Child's Garden of Verses which was published in 1885.

Some of his Ideas for Treasure Island came from playing and spending time with his step-son Lloyd. My Shadow I have a little shadow that goes in and out with
me,
And what can be the use of him is more than I can
see.
He is very, very like me from the heels up to the
head,
And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my
bed.
The funniest thing about him is the way he likes
to grow-
Now at all like proper children, which is always
very slow;
For he sometimes shoots up taller, like an india-
rubber ball.
And he sometimes gets so little that there's
none of him at all. He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to
play
And can only make a fool of me in every sort of
way,
He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you
can see;
I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that
shadow sticks to me!
One morning, very early, before the sun was up,
I rose and found the shining dew on every
buttercup;
But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-
head
Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep
in bed.
Robert Louis Stevenson

My Shadow Analysis:


Personification:
Stevenson uses personification of the shadow to help the reader visualize what that poem is talking about which will help them understand the poem.

End Rhyme:
The ending word on every two lines rhymes. This gives the poem a rhythm that will keep the children engaged in the poem and it can help them with reading because of the use of word families. The funniest thing about him is the way he likes
to grow-
Now at all like proper children, which is always
very slow;
For he sometimes shoots up taller, like an india-
rubber ball.
And he sometimes gets so little that there's
none of him at all.
One morning, very early, before the sun was up,
I rose and found the shining dew on every
buttercup;
But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-
head
Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep
in bed. Conclusion:

Through this poem children will be able to understand its meaning through personification and learn different words through the use of ending rhyme. Activity:

The Students will go outside and on a piece
of paper their shadow will be drawn be another student.

Once they have their shadow drawn, they will write a poem talking about the attributes of their own shadow using end rhyme. Sources:

"Robert Louis Stevenson Website - RLS Website." Robert Louis Stevenson Website. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Oct. 2012. <http://www.robert-louis-stevenson.org/>.

Zipes, Jack, Lissa Paul, Lynne Vallone, Peter Hunt, and Gillian Avery. The Norton Anthology of Children's Literature: The Traditions in English. New York: W.W. Norton, 2005. Print
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