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Going global with the new SDS sheets

New GHS SDS Sheets for the Food Industry

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Transcript of Going global with the new SDS sheets

Going Global with the New SDS Sheets
www.experience-safety.com
Copyright 2013 All Rights Reserved Experience Safety Training & Consulting, Yonkers, NY

®

Source : OSHA – Global Harmonized System for Hazard Communication

Presenter: J Giesberg, FMP, M.A.

Understanding the New Safety Data Sheets for the Food Industry
Copyright 2013 All Rights Reserved Experience Safety Training & Consulting, Yonkers, NY

®

Source : OSHA – Global Harmonized System for Hazard Communication

Presenter: J Giesberg, FMP, M.A.
Understanding the New Safety Data Sheets for the Food Industry

The revised Purple Book contains guidance on developing a GHS SDS (Annex 4).
ILO Standard under the Recommendation 177 on Safety in the Use of Chemicals at Work,
International Standard 11014-1 (1994) of the International Standard Organization (ISO) and ISO Safety Data Sheet for Chemical Products 11014-1: 2003 DRAFT,
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z400.1,
European Union SDS Directive 91/155/-EEC.

Guidance Standards

FOR CHEMICALS IN A SOLID FORM THAT DO NOT PRESENT A COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARD, BUT MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUSTS WHILE BEING PROCESSED IN NORMAL DOWNSTREAM USES, PARAGRAPH (F)(4) OF THE HCS ALLOWS THE CHEMICAL MANUFACTURER SOME FLEXIBILITY IN LABELING REQUIREMENTS.
THE MANUFACTURER OR IMPORTER TO MAY TRANSMIT THE LABEL TO THE CUSTOMER AT THE TIME OF THE INITIAL SHIPMENT, BUT THE LABEL DOES NOT NEED TO BE INCLUDED WITH SUBSEQUENT SHIPMENTS UNLESS IT CHANGES.
THIS PROVIDES THE NEEDED INFORMATION TO THE DOWNSTREAM USERS ON THE POTENTIAL HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE, WHILE ACKNOWLEDGING THAT THE SOLID METAL OR OTHER MATERIALS DO NOT PRESENT THE SAME HAZARDS THAT ARE PRODUCED WHEN THESE MATERIALS ARE PROCESSED UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS OF USE.



Combustible Dust

OSHA has revised the definition of simple asphyxiants that was proposed in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) as a result of comments from the regulated community.
In the final HCS, simple asphyxiants must be labeled where appropriate, and be addressed on SDSs.
OSHA has provided label elements for simple asphyxiants which include the signal word "warning" and the hazard statement "may displace oxygen and cause rapid suffocation".

Simple asphyxiants

OSHA HAS RETAINED THE DEFINITION FOR PYROPHORIC GASES FROM THE CURRENT HCS.
PYROPHORIC GASES MUST BE ADDRESSED BOTH ON CONTAINER LABELS AND SDS’S.
OSHA HAS PROVIDED LABEL ELEMENTS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES WHICH INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "DANGER" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "CATCHES FIRE SPONTANEOUSLY IF EXPOSED TO AIR".

Pyrophoric gases

OSHA is retaining the requirement to include the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) on the safety data sheet (SDS) in the revised Standard.
OSHA finds that requiring TLVs on the SDS will provide employers and employees with useful information to help them assess the hazards presented by their workplaces.
In addition to TLVs, OSHA permissible exposure limits (PELs), and any other exposure limits used or recommended by the chemical manufacturer, importer, or employer preparing the safety data sheet are also required.

TLV’S REQUIRED ON THE SAFETY DATA SHEET

HCS Pictograms and Hazards

Confidential business information (CBI) will not be harmonized under the GHS.
National and International authorities should establish appropriate mechanisms for CBI protection.
The GHS established CBI principles which include:
CBI provisions should not compromise the health and safety of users
CBI claims should be limited to the names of chemicals and their concentrations in mixtures
Mechanisms should be established for disclosure in emergency and non-emergency situations

Trade Secret Ingredients and Proprietary Information

Foodborne outbreak or illness
New chemical or food additive used in food operation
Food and chemical storage climate considerations
Reactions based on temperature or surrounding chemicals
Metals, plastics or other material used during food preparation
Chemical accident (ie. emergency, spill, crisis, mishap)

When to refer to an SDS

MAY BE CONTINUOUSLY UPDATED WITH OLDER SDS’S DESTROYED OR THROWN OUT
RECOMMENDED TO BE PART OF AN ON-GOING HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM AT ESTABLISHMENT
REFERRED TO DURING AN EMERGENCY

Access and filing of SDS

Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.
UN Number.

UN Proper shipping name.

Transport Hazard class and/or classes.

Packing group, (if applicable).

Marine pollutant (Yes/No).

Special precautions which a user needs to be aware of or needs to comply with in connection with transport or conveyance either within or outside their premises.

14. Transport Information

Description of waste residues and information on their safe handling and methods of disposal, including the disposal of any contaminated packaging.

13. Disposal Consideration

Chemical stability.

Possibility of hazardous reactions.

Conditions to avoid (e.g., static discharge, shock or vibration).

Incompatible materials.

Hazardous decomposition products.

10. Stability and Reactivity

Precautions for safe handling.

Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities.

7. Handling and Storage

Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures.

Environmental precautions.

Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up.

6. Accidental Release Measures

Substance
Chemical identity.
Common name, synonyms, etc.
Chemical Abstract Service (CAS)number, European Commission (EC) number, etc.
Impurities and stabilizing additives which are themselves classified and which contribute to the classification of the substance.
Mixture
The chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are hazardous within the meaning of the GHS and are present above their cut-off levels.
NOTE: For information on ingredients, the competent authority rules take priority over the rules for product identification

3. Composition/Information on Ingredients

Section 1. Identification
Section 2. Hazard(s) identification
Section 3. Composition/information on ingredients
Section 4. First-Aid measures
Section 5. Fire-fighting measures
Section 6. Accidental release measures
Section 7. Handling and storage
Section 8. Exposure controls/personal protection
Section 9. Physical and chemical properties
Section 10. Stability and reactivity
Section 11. Toxicological information
Section 12. Ecological information
Section 13. Disposal considerations
Section 14. Transport information
Section 15. Regulatory information
Section 16. Other information, including date of preparation or last revision

Minimum Information on SDS
Deadlines for implementation of GHS standard

The New SDS Sheet
THE BASIC GOAL OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION IS TO ENSURE THAT GOVERNMENTS, EMPLOYERS, EMPLOYEES AND THE PUBLIC ARE PROVIDED WITH ADEQUATE, PRACTICAL, RELIABLE AND COMPREHENSIBLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS, SO THAT THEY CAN TAKE EFFECTIVE PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY.
IT IS PREDICTED THAT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GHS WILL:
ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT BY PROVIDING AN INTERNATIONALLY COMPREHENSIBLE SYSTEM
PROVIDE A RECOGNIZED FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP REGULATIONS FOR THOSE COUNTRIES WITHOUT EXISTING SYSTEMS
FACILITATE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS WHOSE HAZARDS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED ON AN INTERNATIONAL BASIS
REDUCE THE NEED FOR TESTING AND EVALUATION AGAINST MULTIPLE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS

Benefits of GHS

THESE DIFFERENCES IN HAZARDS AND SDS/LABELS IMPACT BOTH PROTECTION AND TRADE. IN THE AREA OF PROTECTION, USERS MAY SEE DIFFERENT LABEL WARNINGS OR SAFETY DATA SHEET INFORMATION FOR THE SAME CHEMICAL.
IN THE AREA OF TRADE, THE NEED TO COMPLY WITH MULTIPLE REGULATIONS REGARDING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING IS COSTLY AND TIME-CONSUMING.
SOME MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THERE ARE OVER 100 DIVERSE HAZARD COMMUNICATION REGULATIONS FOR THEIR PRODUCTS GLOBALLY.
FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES (SME’S), REGULATORY COMPLIANCE IS COMPLEX AND COSTLY, AND IT CAN ACT AS A BARRIER TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS.

Global Differences

CHEMICALS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY AFFECT OUR LIVES AND ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR FOOD, HEALTH, AND LIFESTYLE. THE WIDESPREAD USE OF CHEMICALS HAS RESULTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SECTOR-SPECIFIC REGULATIONS (TRANSPORT, PRODUCTION, WORKPLACE, AGRICULTURE, TRADE, AND CONSUMER PRODUCTS).
HAVING READILY AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDOUS PROPERTIES OF CHEMICALS, AND RECOMMENDED CONTROL MEASURES, ALLOWS THE PRODUCTION, TRANSPORT, USE AND DISPOSAL OF CHEMICALS TO BE MANAGED SAFELY WHERE HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT ARE PROTECTED.
A NUMBER OF CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS EXIST, EACH ADDRESSING SPECIFIC USE PATTERNS AND GROUPS OF CHEMICALS, AT THE NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEVELS. THE EXISTING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS ADDRESS POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS IN ALL THE TYPES OF USE SETTINGS. WHILE THE EXISTING LAWS AND REGULATIONS ARE SIMILAR, THEY ARE DIFFERENT ENOUGH TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE LABELS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT BOTH WITHIN THE U.S. AND IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE SAFETY DATA SHEETS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE. SEVERAL U.S. REGULATORY AGENCIES AND VARIOUS COUNTRIES HAVE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS FOR HAZARD DEFINITIONS AS WELL AS FOR INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED ON LABELS OR MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS.
A DISPARITY EXISTS WHERE A PRODUCT MAY BE CONSIDERED FLAMMABLE OR TOXIC BY ONE AGENCY OR COUNTRY, BUT NOT BY ANOTHER.

Why was the GHS developed?

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of every chemical.

It is an international approach to:
Defining health, physical and environmental hazards of all chemicals; Creating classification procedures that use available data on chemicals for comparison with defined hazard criteria; and Communicating hazard information, as well as protective measures,  on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

What is the GHS?
In the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), OSHA is lifting the stay on enforcement regarding the provision to update labels when new information on hazards becomes available.
Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, or employers who become newly aware of any significant information regarding the hazards of a chemical shall revise the labels for the chemical within six months of becoming aware of the new information, and shall ensure that labels on containers of hazardous chemicals shipped after that time contain the new information.
If the chemical is not currently produced or imported, the chemical manufacturer, importer, distributor, or employer shall add the information to the label before the chemical is shipped or introduced into the workplace again.

Label information update


OSHA HAS NOT PROVIDED A DEFINITION FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE FINAL HCS GIVEN ONGOING ACTIVITIES IN THE SPECIFIC RULEMAKING, AS WELL AS IN THE UNITED NATIONS SUB-COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE GHS (UN/SCEGHS).
GUIDANCE IS BEING PROVIDED THROUGH EXISTING DOCUMENTS, INCLUDING THE COMBUSTIBLE DUST NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM DIRECTIVE CPL 03-00-008, WHICH INCLUDES AN OPERATIVE DEFINITION, AS WELL AS PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT CURRENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN THIS AREA.
IN THE FINAL HCS, COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARDS MUST BE ADDRESSED ON LABELS AND SDS’S.
LABEL ELEMENTS ARE PROVIDED FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST IN THE FINAL HCS AND INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "WARNING" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUST CONCENTRATIONS IN THE AIR".



Combustible Dust

OSHA HAS ADDED PYROPHORIC GASES, SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS AND COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE DEFINITION OF "HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL".
OSHA HAS ALSO ADDED DEFINITIONS TO THE REVISED HCS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES AND SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS, AND PROVIDED GUIDANCE ON HOW TO DEFINE COMBUSTIBLE DUST FOR THE PURPOSES OF COMPLYING WITH THE HCS.


The definition of "hazardous chemical"

Acute Oral Toxicity

Transportation

PICTOGRAM: A SYMBOL PLUS OTHER GRAPHIC ELEMENTS, SUCH AS A BORDER, BACKGROUND PATTERN, OR COLOR THAT IS INTENDED TO CONVEY SPECIFIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE HAZARDS OF A CHEMICAL. EACH PICTOGRAM CONSISTS OF A DIFFERENT SYMBOL ON A WHITE BACKGROUND WITHIN A RED SQUARE FRAME SET ON A POINT (I.E. A RED DIAMOND). THERE ARE NINE PICTOGRAMS UNDER THE GHS. HOWEVER, ONLY EIGHT PICTOGRAMS ARE REQUIRED UNDER THE HCS (OSHA).
SIGNAL WORDS: A SINGLE WORD USED TO INDICATE THE RELATIVE LEVEL OF SEVERITY OF HAZARD AND ALERT THE READER TO A POTENTIAL HAZARD ON THE LABEL. THE SIGNAL WORDS USED ARE "DANGER" AND "WARNING." "DANGER" IS USED FOR THE MORE SEVERE HAZARDS, WHILE "WARNING" IS USED FOR LESS SEVERE HAZARDS.

Labeling Changes

Labeling Changes

Hazard Statement: a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, and the degree of hazard.
Precautionary Statement: a phrase that describes recommended measures to be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling of a hazardous chemical.

DECEMBER 1, 2013 EMPLOYEES WILL BE REQUIRED BY OSHA TO BE TRAINED ON THE NEW LABEL ELEMENTS (I.E., PICTOGRAMS, HAZARD STATEMENTS, PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS, AND SIGNAL WORDS) AND SAFETY DATA SHEET FORMAT.
NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME AS OF YET.
FULL COMPLIANCE WITH THE FINAL RULING WILL BEGIN IN 2015. 
SINCE MANY AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS HAVE ALREADY BEGUN TO PRODUCE HAZCOM 2012/GHS-COMPLIANT LABELS, MANY FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS AND FOOD MANUFACTURING PLANTS WILL SOON BEGIN TO RECEIVE LABELS AND SDSS THAT ARE CONSISTENT WITH THE GHS. 
PROPER AND TIMELY TRAINING IS IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT WHEN EMPLOYEES BEGIN TO SEE THE NEW LABELS AND SDSS IN THEIR WORKPLACES, THEY WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH THEM, UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE THEM, AND ACCESS THE INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY.

Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.

Since the United Nations revises the GHS every two years, OSHA will manage and communicate regular and frequent changes to the Hazard Communication Standard.
Which means that any changes may be adopted on a two year cycle.
Presently most of the recent updates have been clarification of text. OSHA anticipates that future updates of the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) may be necessary and can be done through various rulemaking options, including:
Technical updates for minor terminology changes,
Direct Final Rules for text clarification, and
Notice and Comment rulemaking for more substantive or controversial updates such as additional criteria or changes in health or safety hazard classes or categories.

Updates to GHS

Suppliers should respond to "new and significant" information they receive about a chemical hazard by updating the label and safety data sheet for that chemical.
New and significant information is any information that changes the GHS classification and leads to a change in the label information or information that may affect the SDS.

Changes in SDS Information after publication

Be accessible at a location convenient to all staff and food inspectors
Written in English, French and Target Language
Provided for chemicals contained or currently used in a food establishment

Access and filing of SDS in food establishments

Carcinogenic chemicals and/or food
Chemicals and/or food containing lead, asbestos, etc...
Radiologic Ingredients or food items
May include information on preparation and revision of earlier SDS or errata information as manufacturer may deem necessary or vital

16. Other information

Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product in question.

15. Regulatory Information

Ecotoxicity (aquatic and terrestrial, where available).

Persistence and degradability.

Bioaccumulative potential.

Mobility in soil.

Other adverse effects.

12. Ecological Information

Concise but complete and comprehensible description of the various toxicological (health) effects and the available data used to identify those effects, including:
Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact);
Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics;
Delayed and immediate effects and also chronic effects from short- and long-term exposure;
Numerical measures of toxicity (such as acute toxicity estimates).

11. Toxicological Information

Appearance (physical state, color, etc.).
Odor.
Odor threshold.
pH.
Melting point/freezing point.
Initial boiling point and boiling range.
Flash point.
Evaporation rate.
Flammability (solid, gas).
Upper/lower flammability or explosive limits.
Vapor pressure.
Vapor density.
Relative density.
Solubility(ies).
Partition coefficient: n-octanol/water.
Autoignition temperature.
Decomposition temperature.

9. Physical and Chemical Properties

Control parameters, e.g., occupational exposure limit values or biological limit values.

Appropriate engineering controls.

Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment.

8. Exposure Control/Personal Protection

Suitable (and unsuitable) extinguishing media.

Specific hazards arising from the chemical (e.g., nature of any hazardous combustion products).

Special protective equipment and precautions for firefighters.

5. Firefighting Measures

Description of necessary measures, subdivided according to the different routes of exposure, i.e., inhalation, skin and eye contact, and ingestion.

Most important symptoms/effects, acute and delayed.

Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed, if necessary.

4. First Aid Measures

GHS classification of the substance/mixture and any national or regional information.
GHS label elements, including precautionary statements. (Hazard symbols may be provided as a graphical reproduction of the symbols in black and white or the name of the symbol, e.g., flame, skull and crossbones.)
Other hazards which do not result in classification (e.g., dust explosion hazard) or are not covered by the GHS.

2. Hazards Identification

GHS product identifier.
Other means of identification.
Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use.
Supplier's details (including name, address, phone number, etc.).
Emergency phone number.

1. Identification of the substance or mixture and of the supplier

Benefits to governments are:
Fewer chemical accidents and incidents,
Lower health care costs,
Improved protection of workers and the public from chemical hazards,
Avoiding duplication of effort in creating national systems,
Reduction in the costs of enforcement,
Improved reputation on chemical issues, both domestically and internationally.

Benefits to companies include:
A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
Improved corporate image and credibility.

Benefits to workers and members of the public include:
Improved safety for workers and others through consistent and simplified communications on chemical hazards and practices to follow for safe handling and use,
Greater awareness of hazards, resulting in safer use of chemicals in the workplace and in the home.


Benefits to Governments, Companies, and the Public

Broad Scope of GHS

REGULATORY AUTHORITIES IN COUNTRIES ADOPTING THE GHS MAY IMPLEMENT CRITERIA AND PROVISIONS INTO THEIR OWN REGULATORY PROCESS AND PROCEDURES RATHER THAN SIMPLY INCORPORATING THE TEXT OF THE GHS INTO THEIR NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS.

THE GHS DOCUMENT WILL PROVIDE COUNTRIES WITH THE REGULATORY BUILDING BLOCKS TO DEVELOP OR MODIFY EXISTING NATIONAL PROGRAMS THAT ADDRESS CLASSIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT THOSE HAZARDS AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTIVE MEASURES, ULTIMATELY ENSURING THE SAFE USE OF CHEMICALS AS THEY MOVE THROUGH THE PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE FROM "CRADLE TO GRAVE."

THE INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGANIZATION (ILO) STUDIED THE TASKS REQUIRED TO ACHIEVE HARMONIZATION. THE ILO DECIDED THAT THERE WERE FOUR MAJOR EXISTING SYSTEMS THAT NEEDED TO BE HARMONIZED TO ACHIEVE A GLOBAL APPROACH INCLUDING: UN TRANSPORT RECOMMENDATIONS
U.S. REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMER AND PESTICIDES
EUROPEAN UNION DANGEROUS SUBSTANCE AND PREPARATIONS DIRECTIVES
CANADIAN REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMERS AND PESTICIDES
A COORDINATING GROUP FOR THE HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS (CG/HCCS) WAS CREATED UNDER THE INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME FOR THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS (IOMC) AND THEY WERE CHARGED WITH COORDINATING AND MANAGING DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYSTEM. THE CG/HCCS WORKED ON A CONSENSUS BASIS AND INCLUDED REPRESENTATIVES FROM MAJOR STAKEHOLDERS, INCLUDING NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS, INDUSTRY AND WORKERS. THEY CREATED A SET OF GUIDING PRINCIPLES INCLUDING: PROTECTION WILL NOT BE REDUCED
WILL BE BASED ON INTRINSIC PROPERTIES (HAZARDS) OF CHEMICALS
ALL TYPES OF CHEMICALS WILL BE COVERED
ALL SYSTEMS WILL HAVE TO BE CHANGED
INVOLVEMENT OF ALL STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD BE ENSURED
CLARITY MUST BE ADDRESSED

Guiding Principles

The single most important force that drove the creation of the GHS was the International Mandate adopted in the 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), also called the "Earth Summit".


International Mandate from UNCED Agenda 21, Chapter 19 stated that "A globally harmonized hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, should be available, if feasible, by the year 2000."


The harmonization of classification and labelling of chemicals was one of six program areas that were recommended by the United Nations General Assembly to strengthen international efforts concerning the environmentally sound management of chemicals.


It was recognized that an internationally harmonized approach to classification and labelling would provide the foundation for all countries to develop comprehensive national programs to ensure the safe use of chemicals.

How was it created?

Information not drawn to scale and not updated

Differences in Chemical Hazards
Objectives
History of GHS Inception and Implementation

Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.

Access and filing of safety data sheets in food establishments.

When to refer to an SDS, (ie. foodborne outbreak, chemical emergency, accident)

Deadlines of training and implementation of the GHS system.

Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.
For More Information, Please Contact:

ANSI: AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE HTTP://WWW.ANSI.ORG
APEC: ASIA-PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION HTTP://WWW.APEC.ORG
ASTM: AMERICAN SOCIETY OF TESTING AND MATERIALS HTTP://WWW.ASTM.ORG
CG/HCCS: COORDINATING GROUP FOR HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS HTTP://WWW.ILO.ORG/LEGACY/ENGLISH/PROTECTION/SAFEWORK/GHS/GHSDOCS/HC2INF1.PDF USEPA: US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.EPA.GOV/OPPFEAD1/INTERNATIONAL/GLOBAL/GLOBA-WHITEPAPER.PDF
IOMC: INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME ON THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS HTTP://WWW.WHO.INT/IOMC/EN/
IUPAC: INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY HTTP://IUPAC.ORG
NFPA: NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.NFPA.ORG
OECD: THE ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.OECD.ORG/
OSHA: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION HAZARD COMMUNICATION – SAFETY DATA SHEETS HTTPS://WWW.OSHA.GOV/PUBLICATIONS/HAZCOMM_QUICKCARD_SAFETYDATA.HTML
UNITED NATIONS COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS HTTP://WWW.UNECE.ORG/TRANS/DANGER/DANGER.HTML
UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.UN.ORG/GENINFO/BP/ENVIRO.HTML
USDOT: US DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HTTP://WWW.DOT.GOV
WORLD SUMMIT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.WORLDSUMMIT2002.ORG/



References

The GHS itself is not a regulation or a standard.
The GHS Document "The Purple Book", establishes agreed hazard classification and communication provisions with descriptive information on how to apply the system.
The elements in the GHS is simply a tool to meet the basic requirement of any hazard communication system, which is to decide if the chemical product produced and/or supplied is hazardous and to prepare an appropriate label and/or Safety Data Sheet.
THE “PURPLE” BOOK

Copyright 2013 All Rights Reserved Experience Safety Training & Consulting, Yonkers, NY
®

Source : OSHA – Global Harmonized System for Hazard Communication

Presenter: J Giesberg, FMP, M.A.
Understanding the New Safety Data Sheets for the Food Industry
In the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), OSHA is lifting the stay on enforcement regarding the provision to update labels when new information on hazards becomes available.
Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, or employers who become newly aware of any significant information regarding the hazards of a chemical shall revise the labels for the chemical within six months of becoming aware of the new information, and shall ensure that labels on containers of hazardous chemicals shipped after that time contain the new information.
If the chemical is not currently produced or imported, the chemical manufacturer, importer, distributor, or employer shall add the information to the label before the chemical is shipped or introduced into the workplace again.

Label information update


OSHA HAS NOT PROVIDED A DEFINITION FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE FINAL HCS GIVEN ONGOING ACTIVITIES IN THE SPECIFIC RULEMAKING, AS WELL AS IN THE UNITED NATIONS SUB-COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE GHS (UN/SCEGHS).
GUIDANCE IS BEING PROVIDED THROUGH EXISTING DOCUMENTS, INCLUDING THE COMBUSTIBLE DUST NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM DIRECTIVE CPL 03-00-008, WHICH INCLUDES AN OPERATIVE DEFINITION, AS WELL AS PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT CURRENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN THIS AREA.
IN THE FINAL HCS, COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARDS MUST BE ADDRESSED ON LABELS AND SDS’S.
LABEL ELEMENTS ARE PROVIDED FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST IN THE FINAL HCS AND INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "WARNING" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUST CONCENTRATIONS IN THE AIR".



Combustible Dust

OSHA HAS ADDED PYROPHORIC GASES, SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS AND COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE DEFINITION OF "HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL".
OSHA HAS ALSO ADDED DEFINITIONS TO THE REVISED HCS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES AND SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS, AND PROVIDED GUIDANCE ON HOW TO DEFINE COMBUSTIBLE DUST FOR THE PURPOSES OF COMPLYING WITH THE HCS.


The definition of "hazardous chemical"

Transportation

Labeling Changes

Hazard Statement: a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, and the degree of hazard.
Precautionary Statement: a phrase that describes recommended measures to be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling of a hazardous chemical.

Foodborne outbreak or illness
New chemical or food additive used in food operation
Food and chemical storage climate considerations
Reactions based on temperature or surrounding chemicals
Metals, plastics or other material used during food preparation
Chemical accident (ie. emergency, spill, crisis, mishap)

When to refer to an SDS
Suppliers should respond to "new and significant" information they receive about a chemical hazard by updating the label and safety data sheet for that chemical.
New and significant information is any information that changes the GHS classification and leads to a change in the label information or information that may affect the SDS.

Changes in SDS Information after publication

Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.
Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product in question.

15. Regulatory Information
UN Number.

UN Proper shipping name.

Transport Hazard class and/or classes.

Packing group, (if applicable).

Marine pollutant (Yes/No).

Special precautions which a user needs to be aware of or needs to comply with in connection with transport or conveyance either within or outside their premises.

14. Transport Information
Ecotoxicity (aquatic and terrestrial, where available).

Persistence and degradability.

Bioaccumulative potential.

Mobility in soil.

Other adverse effects.

12. Ecological Information
Concise but complete and comprehensible description of the various toxicological (health) effects and the available data used to identify those effects, including:
Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact);
Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics;
Delayed and immediate effects and also chronic effects from short- and long-term exposure;
Numerical measures of toxicity (such as acute toxicity estimates).

11. Toxicological Information
Appearance (physical state, color, etc.).
Odor.
Odor threshold.
pH.
Melting point/freezing point.
Initial boiling point and boiling range.
Flash point.
Evaporation rate.
Flammability (solid, gas).
Upper/lower flammability or explosive limits.
Vapor pressure.
Vapor density.
Relative density.
Solubility(ies).
Partition coefficient: n-octanol/water.
Autoignition temperature.
Decomposition temperature.

9. Physical and Chemical Properties
Precautions for safe handling.

Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities.

7. Handling and Storage
Suitable (and unsuitable) extinguishing media.

Specific hazards arising from the chemical (e.g., nature of any hazardous combustion products).

Special protective equipment and precautions for firefighters.

5. Firefighting Measures
Description of necessary measures, subdivided according to the different routes of exposure, i.e., inhalation, skin and eye contact, and ingestion.

Most important symptoms/effects, acute and delayed.

Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed, if necessary.

4. First Aid Measures
GHS classification of the substance/mixture and any national or regional information.
GHS label elements, including precautionary statements. (Hazard symbols may be provided as a graphical reproduction of the symbols in black and white or the name of the symbol, e.g., flame, skull and crossbones.)
Other hazards which do not result in classification (e.g., dust explosion hazard) or are not covered by the GHS.

2. Hazards Identification
Section 1. Identification
Section 2. Hazard(s) identification
Section 3. Composition/information on ingredients
Section 4. First-Aid measures
Section 5. Fire-fighting measures
Section 6. Accidental release measures
Section 7. Handling and storage
Section 8. Exposure controls/personal protection
Section 9. Physical and chemical properties
Section 10. Stability and reactivity
Section 11. Toxicological information
Section 12. Ecological information
Section 13. Disposal considerations
Section 14. Transport information
Section 15. Regulatory information
Section 16. Other information, including date of preparation or last revision

Minimum Information on SDS
Benefits to governments are:
Fewer chemical accidents and incidents,
Lower health care costs,
Improved protection of workers and the public from chemical hazards,
Avoiding duplication of effort in creating national systems,
Reduction in the costs of enforcement,
Improved reputation on chemical issues, both domestically and internationally.

Benefits to companies include:
A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
Improved corporate image and credibility.

Benefits to workers and members of the public include:
Improved safety for workers and others through consistent and simplified communications on chemical hazards and practices to follow for safe handling and use,
Greater awareness of hazards, resulting in safer use of chemicals in the workplace and in the home.


Benefits to Governments, Companies, and the Public
The single most important force that drove the creation of the GHS was the International Mandate adopted in the 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), also called the "Earth Summit".


International Mandate from UNCED Agenda 21, Chapter 19 stated that "A globally harmonized hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, should be available, if feasible, by the year 2000."


The harmonization of classification and labelling of chemicals was one of six program areas that were recommended by the United Nations General Assembly to strengthen international efforts concerning the environmentally sound management of chemicals.


It was recognized that an internationally harmonized approach to classification and labelling would provide the foundation for all countries to develop comprehensive national programs to ensure the safe use of chemicals.

How was it created?
THESE DIFFERENCES IN HAZARDS AND SDS/LABELS IMPACT BOTH PROTECTION AND TRADE. IN THE AREA OF PROTECTION, USERS MAY SEE DIFFERENT LABEL WARNINGS OR SAFETY DATA SHEET INFORMATION FOR THE SAME CHEMICAL.
IN THE AREA OF TRADE, THE NEED TO COMPLY WITH MULTIPLE REGULATIONS REGARDING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING IS COSTLY AND TIME-CONSUMING.
SOME MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THERE ARE OVER 100 DIVERSE HAZARD COMMUNICATION REGULATIONS FOR THEIR PRODUCTS GLOBALLY.
FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES (SME’S), REGULATORY COMPLIANCE COMPLEXIS AND COSTLY, AND IT CAN ACT AS A BARRIER TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS.

Global Differences
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labelling of every chemical.

It is an international approach to:
Defining health, physical and environmental hazards of all chemicals; Creating classification procedures that use available data on chemicals for comparison with defined hazard criteria; and Communicating hazard information, as well as protective measures,  on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

What is the GHS?

Objectives

History of GHS Inception and Implementation
Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.
Access and filing of safety data sheets in food establishments.
When to refer to an SDS, (ie. foodborne outbreak, chemical emergency, accident)
Deadlines of training and implementation of the GHS system.
Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.

The revised Purple Book contains guidance on developing a GHS SDS (Annex 4).
ILO Standard under the Recommendation 177 on Safety in the Use of Chemicals at Work,
International Standard 11014-1 (1994) of the International Standard Organization (ISO) and ISO Safety Data Sheet for Chemical Products 11014-1: 2003 DRAFT,
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z400.1,
European Union SDS Directive 91/155/-EEC.

Guidance Standards

FOR CHEMICALS IN A SOLID FORM THAT DO NOT PRESENT A COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARD, BUT MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUSTS WHILE BEING PROCESSED IN NORMAL DOWNSTREAM USES, PARAGRAPH (F)(4) OF THE HCS ALLOWS THE CHEMICAL MANUFACTURER SOME FLEXIBILITY IN LABELING REQUIREMENTS.
THE MANUFACTURER OR IMPORTER TO MAY TRANSMIT THE LABEL TO THE CUSTOMER AT THE TIME OF THE INITIAL SHIPMENT, BUT THE LABEL DOES NOT NEED TO BE INCLUDED WITH SUBSEQUENT SHIPMENTS UNLESS IT CHANGES.
THIS PROVIDES THE NEEDED INFORMATION TO THE DOWNSTREAM USERS ON THE POTENTIAL HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE, WHILE ACKNOWLEDGING THAT THE SOLID METAL OR OTHER MATERIALS DO NOT PRESENT THE SAME HAZARDS THAT ARE PRODUCED WHEN THESE MATERIALS ARE PROCESSED UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS OF USE.



Combustible Dust

OSHA has revised the definition of simple asphyxiants that was proposed in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) as a result of comments from the regulated community.
In the final HCS, simple asphyxiants must be labeled where appropriate, and be addressed on SDSs.
OSHA has provided label elements for simple asphyxiants which include the signal word "warning" and the hazard statement "may displace oxygen and cause rapid suffocation".

Simple asphyxiants

OSHA HAS RETAINED THE DEFINITION FOR PYROPHORIC GASES FROM THE CURRENT HCS.
PYROPHORIC GASES MUST BE ADDRESSED BOTH ON CONTAINER LABELS AND SDS’S.
OSHA HAS PROVIDED LABEL ELEMENTS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES WHICH INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "DANGER" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "CATCHES FIRE SPONTANEOUSLY IF EXPOSED TO AIR".

Pyrophoric gases

OSHA is retaining the requirement to include the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) on the safety data sheet (SDS) in the revised Standard.
OSHA finds that requiring TLVs on the SDS will provide employers and employees with useful information to help them assess the hazards presented by their workplaces.
In addition to TLVs, OSHA permissible exposure limits (PELs), and any other exposure limits used or recommended by the chemical manufacturer, importer, or employer preparing the safety data sheet are also required.

TLV’S REQUIRED ON THE SAFETY DATA SHEET

Acute Oral Toxicity

HCS Pictograms and Hazards

PICTOGRAM: A SYMBOL PLUS OTHER GRAPHIC ELEMENTS, SUCH AS A BORDER, BACKGROUND PATTERN, OR COLOR THAT IS INTENDED TO CONVEY SPECIFIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE HAZARDS OF A CHEMICAL. EACH PICTOGRAM CONSISTS OF A DIFFERENT SYMBOL ON A WHITE BACKGROUND WITHIN A RED SQUARE FRAME SET ON A POINT (I.E. A RED DIAMOND). THERE ARE NINE PICTOGRAMS UNDER THE GHS. HOWEVER, ONLY EIGHT PICTOGRAMS ARE REQUIRED UNDER THE HCS (OSHA).
SIGNAL WORDS: A SINGLE WORD USED TO INDICATE THE RELATIVE LEVEL OF SEVERITY OF HAZARD AND ALERT THE READER TO A POTENTIAL HAZARD ON THE LABEL. THE SIGNAL WORDS USED ARE "DANGER" AND "WARNING." "DANGER" IS USED FOR THE MORE SEVERE HAZARDS, WHILE "WARNING" IS USED FOR LESS SEVERE HAZARDS.

Labeling Changes

Confidential business information (CBI) will not be harmonized under the GHS.
National and International authorities should establish appropriate mechanisms for CBI protection.
The GHS established CBI principles which include:
CBI provisions should not compromise the health and safety of users
CBI claims should be limited to the names of chemicals and their concentrations in mixtures
Mechanisms should be established for disclosure in emergency and non-emergency situations

Trade Secret Ingredients and Proprietary Information

DECEMBER 1, 2013 EMPLOYEES WILL BE REQUIRED BY OSHA TO BE TRAINED ON THE NEW LABEL ELEMENTS (I.E., PICTOGRAMS, HAZARD STATEMENTS, PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS, AND SIGNAL WORDS) AND SAFETY DATA SHEET FORMAT.
NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME AS OF YET.
FULL COMPLIANCE WITH THE FINAL RULING WILL BEGIN IN 2015. 
SINCE MANY AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS HAVE ALREADY BEGUN TO PRODUCE HAZCOM 2012/GHS-COMPLIANT LABELS, MANY FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS AND FOOD MANUFACTURING PLANTS WILL SOON BEGIN TO RECEIVE LABELS AND SDSS THAT ARE CONSISTENT WITH THE GHS. 
PROPER AND TIMELY TRAINING IS IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT WHEN EMPLOYEES BEGIN TO SEE THE NEW LABELS AND SDSS IN THEIR WORKPLACES, THEY WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH THEM, UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE THEM, AND ACCESS THE INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY.

Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.

Since the United Nations revises the GHS every two years, OSHA will manage and communicate regular and frequent changes to the Hazard Communication Standard.
Which means that any changes may be adopted on a two year cycle.
Presently most of the recent updates have been clarification of text. OSHA anticipates that future updates of the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) may be necessary and can be done through various rulemaking options, including:
Technical updates for minor terminology changes,
Direct Final Rules for text clarification, and
Notice and Comment rulemaking for more substantive or controversial updates such as additional criteria or changes in health or safety hazard classes or categories.

Updates to GHS

MAY BE CONTINUOUSLY UPDATED WITH OLDER SDS’S DESTROYED OR THROWN OUT
RECOMMENDED TO BE PART OF AN ON-GOING HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM AT ESTABLISHMENT
REFERRED TO DURING AN EMERGENCY

Access and filing of SDS
Be accessible at a location convenient to all staff and food inspectors
Written in English, French and Target Language
Provided for chemicals contained or currently used in a food establishment

Access and filing of SDS in food establishments
Carcinogenic chemicals and/or food
Chemicals and/or food containing lead, asbestos, etc...
Radiologic Ingredients or food items
May include information on preparation and revision of earlier SDS or errata information as manufacturer may deem necessary or vital

16. Other information
Description of waste residues and information on their safe handling and methods of disposal, including the disposal of any contaminated packaging.

13. Disposal Consideration
Chemical stability.

Possibility of hazardous reactions.

Conditions to avoid (e.g., static discharge, shock or vibration).

Incompatible materials.

Hazardous decomposition products.

10. Stability and Reactivity
Control parameters, e.g., occupational exposure limit values or biological limit values.

Appropriate engineering controls.

Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment.

8. Exposure Control/Personal Protection
Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures.

Environmental precautions.

Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up.

6. Accidental Release Measures
Substance
Chemical identity.
Common name, synonyms, etc.
Chemical Abstract Service (CAS)number, European Commission (EC) number, etc.
Impurities and stabilizing additives which are themselves classified and which contribute to the classification of the substance.
Mixture
The chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are hazardous within the meaning of the GHS and are present above their cut-off levels.
NOTE: For information on ingredients, the competent authority rules take priority over the rules for product identification

3. Composition/Information on Ingredients
GHS product identifier.
Other means of identification.
Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use.
Supplier's details (including name, address, phone number, etc.).
Emergency phone number.

1. Identification of the substance or mixture and of the supplier
Deadlines for implementation of GHS standard
THE SAFETY DATA SHEET (SDS) PROVIDES COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION FOR USE IN WORKPLACE CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT.
EMPLOYERS AND WORKERS USE THE SDS AS SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HAZARDS AND TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.
THE SDS IS PRODUCT-RELATED AND, USUALLY, IS NOT ABLE TO PROVIDE INFORMATION THAT IS SPECIFIC FOR ANY GIVEN WORKPLACE WHERE THE PRODUCT MAY BE USED.
HOWEVER, THE SDS INFORMATION ENABLES THE EMPLOYER TO DEVELOP AN ACTIVE PROGRAM OF WORKER PROTECTION MEASURES, INCLUDING TRAINING, WHICH IS SPECIFIC TO THE INDIVIDUAL WORKPLACE AND TO CONSIDER ANY MEASURES THAT MAY BE NECESSARY TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT.
INFORMATION IN A SDS ALSO PROVIDES A SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR OTHER TARGET AUDIENCES SUCH AS TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS, EMERGENCY RESPONDERS, POISON CENTERS, THOSE INVOLVED WITH THE PROFESSIONAL USE OF PESTICIDES AND CONSUMERS.

The New SDS Sheet
THE BASIC GOAL OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION IS TO ENSURE THAT GOVERNMENTS, EMPLOYERS, EMPLOYEES AND THE PUBLIC ARE PROVIDED WITH ADEQUATE, PRACTICAL, RELIABLE AND COMPREHENSIBLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS, SO THAT THEY CAN TAKE EFFECTIVE PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY.
IT IS PREDICTED THAT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GHS WILL:
ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT BY PROVIDING AN INTERNATIONALLY COMPREHENSIBLE SYSTEM
PROVIDE A RECOGNIZED FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP REGULATIONS FOR THOSE COUNTRIES WITHOUT EXISTING SYSTEMS
FACILITATE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS WHOSE HAZARDS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED ON AN INTERNATIONAL BASIS
REDUCE THE NEED FOR TESTING AND EVALUATION AGAINST MULTIPLE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS

Benefits of GHS
Broad Scope of GHS
REGULATORY AUTHORITIES IN COUNTRIES ADOPTING THE GHS MAY IMPLEMENT CRITERIA AND PROVISIONS INTO THEIR OWN REGULATORY PROCESS AND PROCEDURES RATHER THAN SIMPLY INCORPORATING THE TEXT OF THE GHS INTO THEIR NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS.

THE GHS DOCUMENT WILL PROVIDE COUNTRIES WITH THE REGULATORY BUILDING BLOCKS TO DEVELOP OR MODIFY EXISTING NATIONAL PROGRAMS THAT ADDRESS CLASSIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT THOSE HAZARDS AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTIVE MEASURES, ULTIMATELY ENSURING THE SAFE USE OF CHEMICALS AS THEY MOVE THROUGH THE PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE FROM "CRADLE TO GRAVE."

The GHS itself is not a regulation or a standard.
The GHS Document "The Purple Book", establishes agreed hazard classification and communication provisions with descriptive information on how to apply the system.
The elements in the GHS is simply a tool to meet the basic requirement of any hazard communication system, which is to decide if the chemical product produced and/or supplied is hazardous and to prepare an appropriate label and/or Safety Data Sheet.

THE “PURPLE” BOOK
THE INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGANIZATION (ILO) STUDIED THE TASKS REQUIRED TO ACHIEVE HARMONIZATION. THE ILO DECIDED THAT THERE WERE FOUR MAJOR EXISTING SYSTEMS THAT NEEDED TO BE HARMONIZED TO ACHIEVE A GLOBAL APPROACH INCLUDING: UN TRANSPORT RECOMMENDATIONS
U.S. REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMER AND PESTICIDES
EUROPEAN UNION DANGEROUS SUBSTANCE AND PREPARATIONS DIRECTIVES
CANADIAN REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMERS AND PESTICIDES
A COORDINATING GROUP FOR THE HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS (CG/HCCS) WAS CREATED UNDER THE INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME FOR THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS (IOMC) AND THEY WERE CHARGED WITH COORDINATING AND MANAGING DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYSTEM. THE CG/HCCS WORKED ON A CONSENSUS BASIS AND INCLUDED REPRESENTATIVES FROM MAJOR STAKEHOLDERS, INCLUDING NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS, INDUSTRY AND WORKERS. THEY CREATED A SET OF GUIDING PRINCIPLES INCLUDING: PROTECTION WILL NOT BE REDUCED
WILL BE BASED ON INTRINSIC PROPERTIES (HAZARDS) OF CHEMICALS
ALL TYPES OF CHEMICALS WILL BE COVERED
ALL SYSTEMS WILL HAVE TO BE CHANGED
INVOLVEMENT OF ALL STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD BE ENSURED
CLARITY MUST BE ADDRESSED

Guiding Principles

CHEMICALS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY AFFECT OUR LIVES AND ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR FOOD, HEALTH, AND LIFESTYLE. THE WIDESPREAD USE OF CHEMICALS HAS RESULTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SECTOR-SPECIFIC REGULATIONS (TRANSPORT, PRODUCTION, WORKPLACE, AGRICULTURE, TRADE, AND CONSUMER PRODUCTS).
HAVING READILY AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDOUS PROPERTIES OF CHEMICALS, AND RECOMMENDED CONTROL MEASURES, ALLOWS THE PRODUCTION, TRANSPORT, USE AND DISPOSAL OF CHEMICALS TO BE MANAGED SAFELY WHERE HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT ARE PROTECTED.
A NUMBER OF CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS EXIST, EACH ADDRESSING SPECIFIC USE PATTERNS AND GROUPS OF CHEMICALS, AT THE NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEVELS. THE EXISTING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS ADDRESS POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS IN ALL THE TYPES OF USE SETTINGS. WHILE THE EXISTING LAWS AND REGULATIONS ARE SIMILAR, THEY ARE DIFFERENT ENOUGH TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE LABELS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT BOTH WITHIN THE U.S. AND IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE SAFETY DATA SHEETS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE. SEVERAL U.S. REGULATORY AGENCIES AND VARIOUS COUNTRIES HAVE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS FOR HAZARD DEFINITIONS AS WELL AS FOR INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED ON LABELS OR MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS.
A DISPARITY EXISTS WHERE A PRODUCT MAY BE CONSIDERED FLAMMABLE OR TOXIC BY ONE AGENCY OR COUNTRY, BUT NOT BY ANOTHER.

Why was the GHS developed?

For More Information, Please Contact:

www.experience-safety.com
ANSI: AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE HTTP://WWW.ANSI.ORG
APEC: ASIA-PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION HTTP://WWW.APEC.ORG
ASTM: AMERICAN SOCIETY OF TESTING AND MATERIALS HTTP://WWW.ASTM.ORG
CG/HCCS: COORDINATING GROUP FOR HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS HTTP://WWW.ILO.ORG/LEGACY/ENGLISH/PROTECTION/SAFEWORK/GHS/GHSDOCS/HC2INF1.PDF USEPA: US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.EPA.GOV/OPPFEAD1/INTERNATIONAL/GLOBAL/GLOBA-WHITEPAPER.PDF
IOMC: INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME ON THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS HTTP://WWW.WHO.INT/IOMC/EN/
IUPAC: INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY HTTP://IUPAC.ORG
NFPA: NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.NFPA.ORG
OECD: THE ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.OECD.ORG/
OSHA: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION HAZARD COMMUNICATION – SAFETY DATA SHEETS HTTPS://WWW.OSHA.GOV/PUBLICATIONS/HAZCOMM_QUICKCARD_SAFETYDATA.HTML
UNITED NATIONS COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS HTTP://WWW.UNECE.ORG/TRANS/DANGER/DANGER.HTML
UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.UN.ORG/GENINFO/BP/ENVIRO.HTML
USDOT: US DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HTTP://WWW.DOT.GOV
WORLD SUMMIT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.WORLDSUMMIT2002.ORG/



References
Information not drawn to scale and not updated

Differences in Chemical Hazards
Copyright 2013 All Rights Reserved Experience Safety Training & Consulting, Yonkers, NY

®

Source : OSHA – Global Harmonized System for Hazard Communication

Presenter: Jeffrey Giesberg, FMP, M.S.

Understanding the New Safety Data Sheets for the Food Industry

The revised Purple Book contains guidance on developing a GHS SDS (Annex 4).
ILO Standard under the Recommendation 177 on Safety in the Use of Chemicals at Work,
International Standard 11014-1 (1994) of the International Standard Organization (ISO) and ISO Safety Data Sheet for Chemical Products 11014-1: 2003 DRAFT,
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z400.1,
European Union SDS Directive 91/155/-EEC.

Guidance Standards


OSHA HAS NOT PROVIDED A DEFINITION FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE FINAL HCS GIVEN ONGOING ACTIVITIES IN THE SPECIFIC RULEMAKING, AS WELL AS IN THE UNITED NATIONS SUB-COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE GHS (UN/SCEGHS).
GUIDANCE IS BEING PROVIDED THROUGH EXISTING DOCUMENTS, INCLUDING THE COMBUSTIBLE DUST NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM DIRECTIVE CPL 03-00-008, WHICH INCLUDES AN OPERATIVE DEFINITION, AS WELL AS PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT CURRENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN THIS AREA.
IN THE FINAL HCS, COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARDS MUST BE ADDRESSED ON LABELS AND SDS’S.
LABEL ELEMENTS ARE PROVIDED FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST IN THE FINAL HCS AND INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "WARNING" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUST CONCENTRATIONS IN THE AIR".



Combustible Dust

OSHA HAS ADDED PYROPHORIC GASES, SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS AND COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE DEFINITION OF "HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL".
OSHA HAS ALSO ADDED DEFINITIONS TO THE REVISED HCS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES AND SIMPLE ASPHYXIANTS, AND PROVIDED GUIDANCE ON HOW TO DEFINE COMBUSTIBLE DUST FOR THE PURPOSES OF COMPLYING WITH THE HCS.


The definition of "hazardous chemical"

Acute Oral Toxicity

PICTOGRAM: A SYMBOL PLUS OTHER GRAPHIC ELEMENTS, SUCH AS A BORDER, BACKGROUND PATTERN, OR COLOR THAT IS INTENDED TO CONVEY SPECIFIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE HAZARDS OF A CHEMICAL. EACH PICTOGRAM CONSISTS OF A DIFFERENT SYMBOL ON A WHITE BACKGROUND WITHIN A RED SQUARE FRAME SET ON A POINT (I.E. A RED DIAMOND). THERE ARE NINE PICTOGRAMS UNDER THE GHS. HOWEVER, ONLY EIGHT PICTOGRAMS ARE REQUIRED UNDER THE HCS (OSHA).
SIGNAL WORDS: A SINGLE WORD USED TO INDICATE THE RELATIVE LEVEL OF SEVERITY OF HAZARD AND ALERT THE READER TO A POTENTIAL HAZARD ON THE LABEL. THE SIGNAL WORDS USED ARE "DANGER" AND "WARNING." "DANGER" IS USED FOR THE MORE SEVERE HAZARDS, WHILE "WARNING" IS USED FOR LESS SEVERE HAZARDS.

Labeling Changes

Confidential business information (CBI) will not be harmonized under the GHS.
National and International authorities should establish appropriate mechanisms for CBI protection.
The GHS established CBI principles which include:
CBI provisions should not compromise the health and safety of users
CBI claims should be limited to the names of chemicals and their concentrations in mixtures
Mechanisms should be established for disclosure in emergency and non-emergency situations

Trade Secret Ingredients and Proprietary Information

Since the United Nations revises the GHS every two years, OSHA will manage and communicate regular and frequent changes to the Hazard Communication Standard.
Which means that any changes may be adopted on a two year cycle.
Presently most of the recent updates have been clarification of text. OSHA anticipates that future updates of the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) may be necessary and can be done through various rulemaking options, including:
Technical updates for minor terminology changes,
Direct Final Rules for text clarification, and
Notice and Comment rulemaking for more substantive or controversial updates such as additional criteria or changes in health or safety hazard classes or categories.

Updates to GHS

MAY BE CONTINUOUSLY UPDATED WITH OLDER SDS’S DESTROYED OR THROWN OUT
RECOMMENDED TO BE PART OF AN ON-GOING HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM AT ESTABLISHMENT
REFERRED TO DURING AN EMERGENCY

Access and filing of SDS

Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.

Carcinogenic chemicals and/or food
Chemicals and/or food containing lead, asbestos, etc...
Radiologic Ingredients or food items
May include information on preparation and revision of earlier SDS or errata information as manufacturer may deem necessary or vital

16. Other information

UN Number.

UN Proper shipping name.

Transport Hazard class and/or classes.

Packing group, (if applicable).

Marine pollutant (Yes/No).

Special precautions which a user needs to be aware of or needs to comply with in connection with transport or conveyance either within or outside their premises.

14. Transport Information

Description of waste residues and information on their safe handling and methods of disposal, including the disposal of any contaminated packaging.

13. Disposal Consideration

Concise but complete and comprehensible description of the various toxicological (health) effects and the available data used to identify those effects, including:
Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact);
Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics;
Delayed and immediate effects and also chronic effects from short- and long-term exposure;
Numerical measures of toxicity (such as acute toxicity estimates).

11. Toxicological Information

Control parameters, e.g., occupational exposure limit values or biological limit values.

Appropriate engineering controls.

Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment.

8. Exposure Control/Personal Protection

Suitable (and unsuitable) extinguishing media.

Specific hazards arising from the chemical (e.g., nature of any hazardous combustion products).

Special protective equipment and precautions for firefighters.

5. Firefighting Measures

GHS classification of the substance/mixture and any national or regional information.
GHS label elements, including precautionary statements. (Hazard symbols may be provided as a graphical reproduction of the symbols in black and white or the name of the symbol, e.g., flame, skull and crossbones.)
Other hazards which do not result in classification (e.g., dust explosion hazard) or are not covered by the GHS.

2. Hazards Identification

Section 1. Identification
Section 2. Hazard(s) identification
Section 3. Composition/information on ingredients
Section 4. First-Aid measures
Section 5. Fire-fighting measures
Section 6. Accidental release measures
Section 7. Handling and storage
Section 8. Exposure controls/personal protection
Section 9. Physical and chemical properties
Section 10. Stability and reactivity
Section 11. Toxicological information
Section 12. Ecological information
Section 13. Disposal considerations
Section 14. Transport information
Section 15. Regulatory information
Section 16. Other information, including date of preparation or last revision

Minimum Information on SDS

THE SAFETY DATA SHEET (SDS) PROVIDES COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION FOR USE IN WORKPLACE CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT.
EMPLOYERS AND WORKERS USE THE SDS AS SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HAZARDS AND TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.
THE SDS IS PRODUCT-RELATED AND, USUALLY, IS NOT ABLE TO PROVIDE INFORMATION THAT IS SPECIFIC FOR ANY GIVEN WORKPLACE WHERE THE PRODUCT MAY BE USED.
HOWEVER, THE SDS INFORMATION ENABLES THE EMPLOYER TO DEVELOP AN ACTIVE PROGRAM OF WORKER PROTECTION MEASURES, INCLUDING TRAINING, WHICH IS SPECIFIC TO THE INDIVIDUAL WORKPLACE AND TO CONSIDER ANY MEASURES THAT MAY BE NECESSARY TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT.
INFORMATION IN A SDS ALSO PROVIDES A SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR OTHER TARGET AUDIENCES SUCH AS TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS, EMERGENCY RESPONDERS, POISON CENTERS, THOSE INVOLVED WITH THE PROFESSIONAL USE OF PESTICIDES AND CONSUMERS.

The New SDS Sheet

Broad Scope of GHS

REGULATORY AUTHORITIES IN COUNTRIES ADOPTING THE GHS MAY IMPLEMENT CRITERIA AND PROVISIONS INTO THEIR OWN REGULATORY PROCESS AND PROCEDURES RATHER THAN SIMPLY INCORPORATING THE TEXT OF THE GHS INTO THEIR NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS.

THE GHS DOCUMENT WILL PROVIDE COUNTRIES WITH THE REGULATORY BUILDING BLOCKS TO DEVELOP OR MODIFY EXISTING NATIONAL PROGRAMS THAT ADDRESS CLASSIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT THOSE HAZARDS AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTIVE MEASURES, ULTIMATELY ENSURING THE SAFE USE OF CHEMICALS AS THEY MOVE THROUGH THE PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE FROM "CRADLE TO GRAVE."

The single most important force that drove the creation of the GHS was the International Mandate adopted in the 1992 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), also called the "Earth Summit".


International Mandate from UNCED Agenda 21, Chapter 19 stated that "A globally harmonized hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, should be available, if feasible, by the year 2000."


The harmonization of classification and labelling of chemicals was one of six program areas that were recommended by the United Nations General Assembly to strengthen international efforts concerning the environmentally sound management of chemicals.


It was recognized that an internationally harmonized approach to classification and labelling would provide the foundation for all countries to develop comprehensive national programs to ensure the safe use of chemicals.

How was it created?

CHEMICALS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY AFFECT OUR LIVES AND ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR FOOD, HEALTH, AND LIFESTYLE. THE WIDESPREAD USE OF CHEMICALS HAS RESULTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SECTOR-SPECIFIC REGULATIONS (TRANSPORT, PRODUCTION, WORKPLACE, AGRICULTURE, TRADE, AND CONSUMER PRODUCTS).
HAVING READILY AVAILABLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDOUS PROPERTIES OF CHEMICALS, AND RECOMMENDED CONTROL MEASURES, ALLOWS THE PRODUCTION, TRANSPORT, USE AND DISPOSAL OF CHEMICALS TO BE MANAGED SAFELY WHERE HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT ARE PROTECTED.
A NUMBER OF CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS EXIST, EACH ADDRESSING SPECIFIC USE PATTERNS AND GROUPS OF CHEMICALS, AT THE NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEVELS. THE EXISTING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING SYSTEMS ADDRESS POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS IN ALL THE TYPES OF USE SETTINGS. WHILE THE EXISTING LAWS AND REGULATIONS ARE SIMILAR, THEY ARE DIFFERENT ENOUGH TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE LABELS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT BOTH WITHIN THE U.S. AND IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TO REQUIRE MULTIPLE SAFETY DATA SHEETS FOR THE SAME PRODUCT IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE. SEVERAL U.S. REGULATORY AGENCIES AND VARIOUS COUNTRIES HAVE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS FOR HAZARD DEFINITIONS AS WELL AS FOR INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED ON LABELS OR MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS.
A DISPARITY EXISTS WHERE A PRODUCT MAY BE CONSIDERED FLAMMABLE OR TOXIC BY ONE AGENCY OR COUNTRY, BUT NOT BY ANOTHER.

Why was the GHS developed?

Objectives

History of GHS Inception and Implementation
Various sections of the new SDS affecting food and agricultural products.
Access and filing of safety data sheets in food establishments.
When to refer to an SDS, (ie. foodborne outbreak, chemical emergency, accident)
Deadlines of training and implementation of the GHS system.
Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.

In the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), OSHA is lifting the stay on enforcement regarding the provision to update labels when new information on hazards becomes available.
Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, or employers who become newly aware of any significant information regarding the hazards of a chemical shall revise the labels for the chemical within six months of becoming aware of the new information, and shall ensure that labels on containers of hazardous chemicals shipped after that time contain the new information.
If the chemical is not currently produced or imported, the chemical manufacturer, importer, distributor, or employer shall add the information to the label before the chemical is shipped or introduced into the workplace again.

Label information update

FOR CHEMICALS IN A SOLID FORM THAT DO NOT PRESENT A COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARD, BUT MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUSTS WHILE BEING PROCESSED IN NORMAL DOWNSTREAM USES, PARAGRAPH (F)(4) OF THE HCS ALLOWS THE CHEMICAL MANUFACTURER SOME FLEXIBILITY IN LABELING REQUIREMENTS.
THE MANUFACTURER OR IMPORTER TO MAY TRANSMIT THE LABEL TO THE CUSTOMER AT THE TIME OF THE INITIAL SHIPMENT, BUT THE LABEL DOES NOT NEED TO BE INCLUDED WITH SUBSEQUENT SHIPMENTS UNLESS IT CHANGES.
THIS PROVIDES THE NEEDED INFORMATION TO THE DOWNSTREAM USERS ON THE POTENTIAL HAZARDS IN THE WORKPLACE, WHILE ACKNOWLEDGING THAT THE SOLID METAL OR OTHER MATERIALS DO NOT PRESENT THE SAME HAZARDS THAT ARE PRODUCED WHEN THESE MATERIALS ARE PROCESSED UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS OF USE.



Combustible Dust

OSHA has revised the definition of simple asphyxiants that was proposed in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) as a result of comments from the regulated community.
In the final HCS, simple asphyxiants must be labeled where appropriate, and be addressed on SDSs.
OSHA has provided label elements for simple asphyxiants which include the signal word "warning" and the hazard statement "may displace oxygen and cause rapid suffocation".

Simple asphyxiants

OSHA HAS RETAINED THE DEFINITION FOR PYROPHORIC GASES FROM THE CURRENT HCS.
PYROPHORIC GASES MUST BE ADDRESSED BOTH ON CONTAINER LABELS AND SDS’S.
OSHA HAS PROVIDED LABEL ELEMENTS FOR PYROPHORIC GASES WHICH INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "DANGER" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "CATCHES FIRE SPONTANEOUSLY IF EXPOSED TO AIR".

Pyrophoric gases

OSHA is retaining the requirement to include the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) on the safety data sheet (SDS) in the revised Standard.
OSHA finds that requiring TLVs on the SDS will provide employers and employees with useful information to help them assess the hazards presented by their workplaces.
In addition to TLVs, OSHA permissible exposure limits (PELs), and any other exposure limits used or recommended by the chemical manufacturer, importer, or employer preparing the safety data sheet are also required.

TLV’S REQUIRED ON THE SAFETY DATA SHEET

Transportation

HCS Pictograms and Hazards

Labeling Changes

Hazard Statement: a statement assigned to a hazard class and category that describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, and the degree of hazard.
Precautionary Statement: a phrase that describes recommended measures to be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical, or improper storage or handling of a hazardous chemical.

DECEMBER 1, 2013 EMPLOYEES WILL BE REQUIRED BY OSHA TO BE TRAINED ON THE NEW LABEL ELEMENTS (I.E., PICTOGRAMS, HAZARD STATEMENTS, PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS, AND SIGNAL WORDS) AND SAFETY DATA SHEET FORMAT.
NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME AS OF YET.
FULL COMPLIANCE WITH THE FINAL RULING WILL BEGIN IN 2015. 
SINCE MANY AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CHEMICAL MANUFACTURERS HAVE ALREADY BEGUN TO PRODUCE HAZCOM 2012/GHS-COMPLIANT LABELS, MANY FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS AND FOOD MANUFACTURING PLANTS WILL SOON BEGIN TO RECEIVE LABELS AND SDSS THAT ARE CONSISTENT WITH THE GHS. 
PROPER AND TIMELY TRAINING IS IMPORTANT TO ENSURE THAT WHEN EMPLOYEES BEGIN TO SEE THE NEW LABELS AND SDSS IN THEIR WORKPLACES, THEY WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH THEM, UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE THEM, AND ACCESS THE INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY.

Transition of SDS and removal of MSDS sheets in a food establishment.

Foodborne outbreak or illness
New chemical or food additive used in food operation
Food and chemical storage climate considerations
Reactions based on temperature or surrounding chemicals
Metals, plastics or other material used during food preparation
Chemical accident (ie. emergency, spill, crisis, mishap)

When to refer to an SDS

Suppliers should respond to "new and significant" information they receive about a chemical hazard by updating the label and safety data sheet for that chemical.
New and significant information is any information that changes the GHS classification and leads to a change in the label information or information that may affect the SDS.

Changes in SDS Information after publication

Be accessible at a location convenient to all staff and food inspectors
Written in English, French and Target Language
Provided for chemicals contained or currently used in a food establishment

Access and filing of SDS in food establishments

Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product in question.

15. Regulatory Information

Ecotoxicity (aquatic and terrestrial, where available).

Persistence and degradability.

Bioaccumulative potential.

Mobility in soil.

Other adverse effects.

12. Ecological Information

Chemical stability.

Possibility of hazardous reactions.

Conditions to avoid (e.g., static discharge, shock or vibration).

Incompatible materials.

Hazardous decomposition products.

10. Stability and Reactivity

Appearance (physical state, color, etc.).
Odor.
Odor threshold.
pH.
Melting point/freezing point.
Initial boiling point and boiling range.
Flash point.
Evaporation rate.
Flammability (solid, gas).
Upper/lower flammability or explosive limits.
Vapor pressure.
Vapor density.
Relative density.
Solubility(ies).
Partition coefficient: n-octanol/water.
Autoignition temperature.
Decomposition temperature.

9. Physical and Chemical Properties

Precautions for safe handling.

Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities.

7. Handling and Storage

Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures.

Environmental precautions.

Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up.

6. Accidental Release Measures

Description of necessary measures, subdivided according to the different routes of exposure, i.e., inhalation, skin and eye contact, and ingestion.

Most important symptoms/effects, acute and delayed.

Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed, if necessary.

4. First Aid Measures

Substance
Chemical identity.
Common name, synonyms, etc.
Chemical Abstract Service (CAS)number, European Commission (EC) number, etc.
Impurities and stabilizing additives which are themselves classified and which contribute to the classification of the substance.
Mixture
The chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are hazardous within the meaning of the GHS and are present above their cut-off levels.
NOTE: For information on ingredients, the competent authority rules take priority over the rules for product identification

3. Composition/Information on Ingredients

GHS product identifier.
Other means of identification.
Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use.
Supplier's details (including name, address, phone number, etc.).
Emergency phone number.

1. Identification of the substance or mixture and of the supplier

Deadlines for implementation of GHS standard

Benefits to governments are:
Fewer chemical accidents and incidents,
Lower health care costs,
Improved protection of workers and the public from chemical hazards,
Avoiding duplication of effort in creating national systems,
Reduction in the costs of enforcement,
Improved reputation on chemical issues, both domestically and internationally.

Benefits to companies include:
A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
Improved corporate image and credibility.

Benefits to workers and members of the public include:
Improved safety for workers and others through consistent and simplified communications on chemical hazards and practices to follow for safe handling and use,
Greater awareness of hazards, resulting in safer use of chemicals in the workplace and in the home.


Benefits to Governments, Companies, and the Public

THE BASIC GOAL OF HAZARD COMMUNICATION IS TO ENSURE THAT GOVERNMENTS, EMPLOYERS, EMPLOYEES AND THE PUBLIC ARE PROVIDED WITH ADEQUATE, PRACTICAL, RELIABLE AND COMPREHENSIBLE INFORMATION ON THE HAZARDS OF CHEMICALS, SO THAT THEY CAN TAKE EFFECTIVE PREVENTIVE AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY.
IT IS PREDICTED THAT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GHS WILL:
ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT BY PROVIDING AN INTERNATIONALLY COMPREHENSIBLE SYSTEM
PROVIDE A RECOGNIZED FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP REGULATIONS FOR THOSE COUNTRIES WITHOUT EXISTING SYSTEMS
FACILITATE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS WHOSE HAZARDS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED ON AN INTERNATIONAL BASIS
REDUCE THE NEED FOR TESTING AND EVALUATION AGAINST MULTIPLE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS

Benefits of GHS

THE INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGANIZATION (ILO) STUDIED THE TASKS REQUIRED TO ACHIEVE HARMONIZATION. THE ILO DECIDED THAT THERE WERE FOUR MAJOR EXISTING SYSTEMS THAT NEEDED TO BE HARMONIZED TO ACHIEVE A GLOBAL APPROACH INCLUDING: UN TRANSPORT RECOMMENDATIONS
U.S. REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMER AND PESTICIDES
EUROPEAN UNION DANGEROUS SUBSTANCE AND PREPARATIONS DIRECTIVES
CANADIAN REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE, CONSUMERS AND PESTICIDES
A COORDINATING GROUP FOR THE HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS (CG/HCCS) WAS CREATED UNDER THE INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME FOR THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS (IOMC) AND THEY WERE CHARGED WITH COORDINATING AND MANAGING DEVELOPMENT OF THE SYSTEM. THE CG/HCCS WORKED ON A CONSENSUS BASIS AND INCLUDED REPRESENTATIVES FROM MAJOR STAKEHOLDERS, INCLUDING NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS, INDUSTRY AND WORKERS. THEY CREATED A SET OF GUIDING PRINCIPLES INCLUDING: PROTECTION WILL NOT BE REDUCED
WILL BE BASED ON INTRINSIC PROPERTIES (HAZARDS) OF CHEMICALS
ALL TYPES OF CHEMICALS WILL BE COVERED
ALL SYSTEMS WILL HAVE TO BE CHANGED
INVOLVEMENT OF ALL STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD BE ENSURED
CLARITY MUST BE ADDRESSED

Guiding Principles

THESE DIFFERENCES IN HAZARDS AND SDS/LABELS IMPACT BOTH PROTECTION AND TRADE. IN THE AREA OF PROTECTION, USERS MAY SEE DIFFERENT LABEL WARNINGS OR SAFETY DATA SHEET INFORMATION FOR THE SAME CHEMICAL.
IN THE AREA OF TRADE, THE NEED TO COMPLY WITH MULTIPLE REGULATIONS REGARDING HAZARD CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING IS COSTLY AND TIME-CONSUMING.
SOME MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES HAVE ESTIMATED THAT THERE ARE OVER 100 DIVERSE HAZARD COMMUNICATION REGULATIONS FOR THEIR PRODUCTS GLOBALLY.
FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZE ENTERPRISES (SME’S), REGULATORY COMPLIANCE IS COMPLEX AND COSTLY, AND IT CAN ACT AS A BARRIER TO INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN CHEMICALS.

Global Differences

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labelling of every chemical.

It is an international approach to:
Defining health, physical and environmental hazards of all chemicals; Creating classification procedures that use available data on chemicals for comparison with defined hazard criteria; and Communicating hazard information, as well as protective measures,  on labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

What is the GHS?

For More Information, Please Contact:

ANSI: AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE HTTP://WWW.ANSI.ORG
APEC: ASIA-PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION HTTP://WWW.APEC.ORG
ASTM: AMERICAN SOCIETY OF TESTING AND MATERIALS HTTP://WWW.ASTM.ORG
CG/HCCS: COORDINATING GROUP FOR HARMONIZATION OF CHEMICAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS HTTP://WWW.ILO.ORG/LEGACY/ENGLISH/PROTECTION/SAFEWORK/GHS/GHSDOCS/HC2INF1.PDF USEPA: US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.EPA.GOV/OPPFEAD1/INTERNATIONAL/GLOBAL/GLOBA-WHITEPAPER.PDF
IOMC: INTER-ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME ON THE SOUND MANAGEMENT OF CHEMICALS HTTP://WWW.WHO.INT/IOMC/EN/
IUPAC: INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY HTTP://IUPAC.ORG
NFPA: NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION AGENCY HTTP://WWW.NFPA.ORG
OECD: THE ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.OECD.ORG/
OSHA: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION HAZARD COMMUNICATION – SAFETY DATA SHEETS HTTPS://WWW.OSHA.GOV/PUBLICATIONS/HAZCOMM_QUICKCARD_SAFETYDATA.HTML
UNITED NATIONS COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS HTTP://WWW.UNECE.ORG/TRANS/DANGER/DANGER.HTML
UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.UN.ORG/GENINFO/BP/ENVIRO.HTML
USDOT: US DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HTTP://WWW.DOT.GOV
WORLD SUMMIT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT HTTP://WWW.WORLDSUMMIT2002.ORG/



References

The GHS itself is not a regulation or a standard.
The GHS Document "The Purple Book", establishes agreed hazard classification and communication provisions with descriptive information on how to apply the system.
The elements in the GHS is simply a tool to meet the basic requirement of any hazard communication system, which is to decide if the chemical product produced and/or supplied is hazardous and to prepare an appropriate label and/or Safety Data Sheet.

THE “PURPLE” BOOK

Information not drawn to scale and not updated

Differences in Chemical Hazards

Copyright 2013 All Rights Reserved Experience Safety Training & Consulting, Yonkers, NY

®

Source : OSHA – Global Harmonized System for Hazard Communication

Presenter: Jeffrey Giesberg, FMP, M.S.

Understanding the New Safety Data Sheets for the Food Industry


OSHA HAS NOT PROVIDED A DEFINITION FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST TO THE FINAL HCS GIVEN ONGOING ACTIVITIES IN THE SPECIFIC RULEMAKING, AS WELL AS IN THE UNITED NATIONS SUB-COMMITTEE OF EXPERTS ON THE GHS (UN/SCEGHS).
GUIDANCE IS BEING PROVIDED THROUGH EXISTING DOCUMENTS, INCLUDING THE COMBUSTIBLE DUST NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM DIRECTIVE CPL 03-00-008, WHICH INCLUDES AN OPERATIVE DEFINITION, AS WELL AS PROVIDES INFORMATION ABOUT CURRENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN THIS AREA.
IN THE FINAL HCS, COMBUSTIBLE DUST HAZARDS MUST BE ADDRESSED ON LABELS AND SDS’S.
LABEL ELEMENTS ARE PROVIDED FOR COMBUSTIBLE DUST IN THE FINAL HCS AND INCLUDE THE SIGNAL WORD "WARNING" AND THE HAZARD STATEMENT "MAY FORM COMBUSTIBLE DUST CONCENTRATIONS IN THE AIR".



Combustible Dust

THE SAFETY DATA SHEET (SDS) PROVIDES COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION FOR USE IN WORKPLACE CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT.
EMPLOYERS AND WORKERS USE THE SDS AS SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT HAZARDS AND TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON SAFETY PRECAUTIONS.
THE SDS IS PRODUCT-RELATED AND, USUALLY, IS NOT ABLE TO PROVIDE INFORMATION THAT IS SPECIFIC FOR ANY GIVEN WORKPLACE WHERE THE PRODUCT MAY BE USED.
HOWEVER, THE SDS INFORMATION ENABLES THE EMPLOYER TO DEVELOP AN ACTIVE PROGRAM OF WORKER PROTECTION MEASURES, INCLUDING TRAINING, WHICH IS SPECIFIC TO THE INDIVIDUAL WORKPLACE AND TO CONSIDER ANY MEASURES THAT MAY BE NECESSARY TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT.
INFORMATION IN A SDS ALSO PROVIDES A SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR OTHER TARGET AUDIENCES SUCH AS TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS, EMERGENCY RESPONDERS, POISON CENTERS, THOSE INVOLVED WITH THE PROFESSIONAL USE OF PESTICIDES AND CONSUMERS.
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