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test

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gabe tharp

on 12 May 2010

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Transcript of test

ah, what can ail thee wretched wight alone and palely the sedge is withered from the lake, no bird sings Imagery so haggard and woe begon I see a lily on your brow ...
and on thy cheeks a fading rose I met a lady in the meeds
full beutiful a faery's child. her eyes were wild I sat her on my pacing steed sing a fairies song she found me roots and relish sweet
and honey wild she took me to her elfin grot
and there she wept and sighed full sore
and there i shut her wild eyes
with kisses four cold hill pale kings and princes too
pale warriors, death-pale were they all warning gaped wide La Belle Dame sans Merci by John Keats Whats wrong knight?
you're so alone and woeful.
Trees are dying
And the birds have stopped singing Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has withered from the lake,
and no birds sing Oh what can ail thee, knight-at arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrels granary is full,
and the harvest ndone Oh, what is wrong?
You're so distressed and tired.
the squirrel has collected its food,
and the harvest is over. Paraphrase I see a lily on thy brow,
with anguish moist and fever-dew,
and on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too. I see a flower on your forehead
wilting with sweat and anxiety,
and on your cheeks a fading rose,
withering as well I met a lady in the meads,
full beautiful - a faery's child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light
and her eyes were wild.
I met a lady in the meadow,
The image of beauty,
Her hair was long and step was quiet
and her eyes were wild I made a garlang for her head,
and braclets too, and fragrant zone;
she looked at me as she did love,
and made sweet mone I made a garland for her head
and braclets too and a belt of flowers
she looked at me lovingly
and made sweet moan.. I put her on my pacing steed,
and nothing else saw all day long,
for sidelong would she bend, sing
a faery's song. I sat her on my horse
and i only saw her throughtout the day
she would dance and sing
sweet songs. she found me roots and relish sweet,
and honey wild, and manna- dew,
and sure in language strange she said -
'I love thee true' she found edible, tasty roots
along with honey and delicious dew
and then she spoke a foreign language
which i took to mean "I love you" she took me to her elfin grot,
and there she wept and sighed full sore,
and there i shut her wild eyes
with kisses four. she took me to her home
and there she cied and sighed
I stopped eyes from crying
with four kisses. and there she lulled me asleep
and there I dreamed - Ah! woe betide! -
the latest dream i ever dreamt
on the cold hill side. there i fell asleep.
and had a dream - how terrible
the most detailed dream i ever had
taking place on a cold hill side I saw pale kings and princes too,
pale warriors, death - pale were they all;
they cried - 'la bell dame snas merci
hath thee in thrall I saw pale kings and princes too,
pale warriors also, everone death- pale
they cried "La belle Dame sans merci
you are a powerful enslaver! I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
with horrid warning gaped wide,
and i awoke and found me here,
on the cold hill side. I saw their dried lips in the twilight,
all shouting their awful warning
and awoke and found myself here,
on the cold hills side and this is why i sojourn here
alone palely loitering,
though the sdge is withered from the lake,
and no birds sing. and this is why i rest here
alone and woeful,
though the trees are dying
and no bird sing. Rythm Oh what can ail thee , knight-at arms, tetrameter
alone and palely loitering? trimeter
the sedge has withered from the lake, tetrameter
and no birds sing. trimeter the meter is consistent throughout the poem to show to show that there is one consistent storyline
throughout the poem. Also the first and third lines have iambic tetrameter, and the second and fourth line have iambic trimeter. this is the same rythme that almost all balads contain. this contributes to the theme since the ballads generally are about lost love, so this rythm is used to accentuate the theme of lost love Theme: Elusiviness of love the knight falls into a romance that ends in disappointmnet, a common occurrence in the lives of many. keats comments on the feelings associated with this and expands upon the emotions the knight experiences. foreshadowing in the begining of the poem indicates that something ended badly for the knight. but as he explains the story from the beginning we experience his own emotions simultaneously the reader falls in love with the idea of true love, witnissing the passion between the knight and the women and theur loving romance he woos her, making "a garland for her head ... braclets and [a fragrant sone" (17 -18) and acts with chivalry lifting her up "on his pacing steed." (21) The women was his life for those short stanzas he "nothing else all day saw" (22) but her, dacing and singing subject: keats comments on the double-edged sword that is love, passion, the joy and the ensuing heartbreak. love is pretty confusing La Belle Dame Sans Merci is not a lyric poem because it does, in fact, relate the story of a character. A lyric poem, which is best represented as a song, describes teh emotions and feelings of the author at the time. keats did not use lyrical devices. Diction Form There are four lines in each stanza. This is very typical of ballads. Also the stanzas are syllabic, meaning each stanza is set up the same way in terms of meter all ballads tend to have the consistancy of the meter within the stanzas. Each stanza is a sentence. This contributes to the theme again becouse the subject matter of the poem is simular to that of all ballads,so the author wished to express the theme through a ballad Again the consistency of the stanzas shows the consistency of the story and subject matter of the poem. the most important part of this poem when diction is concerned is the date. The ballad was written in 1819 and as such the language he ueses is rather diferent to that we use today. there are words such as Woebegone that we rarely use today. And there is slang that he uses to attract the teens of his day that never caught on,
such as...
Frangrant Zone:
a sack that ties to the waist Yes they had fanny packs back then too meads: short for meadow
grot: cave
gloam: dusk
and even oh what can ail thee, knight at arms,
alone and palely loitering?
the sedge has withered from the lake,
and no birds sing.

oh what can ail thee, kinight-at arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
the squirrels granary is full,
And the harvest's done.

I see a lily on thy brow,
With anguish moist and fever-dew,
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.

I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful - a faery's child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild.

I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She looked at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan. I set her on my pacing steed,
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sidelong would she bend, and sing
A faery's song.

She found me roots of relish sweet,
And honey wild, and manna-dew,
And sure in language strange she said -
'I love thee true'.

She took me to her elfin grot,
And there she wept and sighed full sore,
And there I shut her wild wild eyes
With kisses four.

And there she lulled me asleep
And there I dreamed - Ah! woe betide! -
The latest dream I ever dreamt
On the cold hill side.

I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried - 'La Belle Dame sans Merci
Hath thee in thrall!'
I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
With horrid warning gaped wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill's side.

And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is withered from the lake,
And no birds sing.

Figures of speech: Metaphor: "anguish most and fever-dew" "i see a lily on thy brow" "and on thy cheecks a fading rose" "a faery's child" "her wild eyes" "there I shut her wild eyes" Personification: "I saw their starved lips in the gloam with horrid warning gaped wide" Irony: "oh what can ail thee, knight-at arms,
Alone and palely lotering? "and there she wept and sighed full sore.
and there i shut her wild eyes" Hyperbole: "the squirrel's granary is full" Rhyme scheme In each stanza, the rhyme scheme is abcb, except for the first two stanzas and the last stanza of the poem wich are slant rhyme in abab the rhythm of the sounds and words creates a flow and steady beat to give the ballad a song-like feel. The rhymes help to maintain the song-like feel and create a sort of harmony within the poem the first and last stanzas of the poem are very similar, in fact the last two lines are the same There is repitition in the first two stanzas with the repeating line "oh, what can ail thee, knight-at-arms" nearly all the stanzas begin with "I" and action in the body of the poem euphony pleasing sound to the ear ( the consonants are soft such as 's' sounds "th" sounds) The poem begins with concrete, descriptive language of the scene in which we find the knight-at-arms or ‘wight.’ For instance, some concrete descriptive language can be seen in the first stanza “The sedge has withered from the lake, and no birds sing.” This is in contrast to the middle section of the poem, where Keats describes the encounter with the “faery child” in more obscure, abstract terms. For instance, he says, “She took me to her elfin grot…and there she lulled me asleep…I saw pale kings and princes too…they cried- ‘La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!’…I saw their starved lips in the gloam, with horrid warning gaped wide, and I awoke and found me here.” He then finishes the poem using more tangible diction. The shift here is precipitated by the man’s becoming enthralled by the “faery child” and then falling into a dream state. As he becomes more enchanted by her spell, the language of the poem becomes more abstract. The dream is the climax of this action; after waking, the knight, as well as the language of the poem, is snapped back to reality. Most of the poem uses simple, yet fanciful language. There are occasional references to obscure things such as “Manna dew,” an “elfin grot,” and in the published version the knight-at-arms is described as being a “wight”. The use of the French phrase “La Belle Dame sans Merci” serves to place more mystery around the character the knight meets in the field; a character with a name or description in a foreign language is typically surrounded by an air of mysticism. Theme Most of the poem uses simple, yet fanciful language. There are occasional references to obscure things such as “Manna dew,” an “elfin grot,” and in the published version the knight-at-arms is described as being a “wight”. The use of the French phrase “La Belle Dame sans Merci” serves to place more mystery around the character the knight meets in the field; a character with a name or description in a foreign language is typically surrounded by an air of mysticism. Words
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