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Little Achievers OT Group

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Cella Healy

on 27 April 2014

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Transcript of Little Achievers OT Group

F
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Victor
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Craig
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Jimmy

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Aaron
Chloe
Celine
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Music
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Art
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Olympics
Food
MOHO
Volition
Enjoys socializing with family & participation in mealtimes.
Experiences frustration around communication.
Values encouragement.
Prefers sedentary activities.
Habituation
Supported routine.

Performance Capacity
Gross and fine motor difficulty.
Communication difficulties.
Affirmed diagnosis

Volition
Motivated to engage in sports.
Good at visual and verbal activities.
Concerns around self-esteem.


Habituation
Personal capacit
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Difficulty with coordination and balance.
Poor fine and gross motor.
Impacting on ADL's.

Volition
Motivated to engage in creative activities.
Enjoys video games/DS.
Not motivated to engage in physical activity.


Habituation
Changes in routine as parents recently separated.
Performance Capacity
Sensitive to noise, touch , textures.
Difficulties with physical activity.


Environment


Moved from urban to rural environment.
Supported extended family environment.


Environment
Environment

Lives with family.
Supportive home environment.
Family are from Poland.
Being excluded from physical activities by his peers.
Volition
Enjoys trampoline & scooter.
Not motivated to communicate in English or play interactive games.
Not motivated to finish tasks.


Habituation
Difficulty sustaining attention with ADL's.
Performance Capacity
Difficulty with fine motor skills and interactive play.
Good gross motor skills.
Participates in autonomous play.


Environment
Lives with his family who have moved from Romania.


Volition
Habituation
Performance Capacity
Environment
Loves music & social interaction.
Communicates predominantly in native language.
Daily routine largely determined by hostel.
Difficulty with use of right hand
Assistance with ADL's.

Victor is from Nigeria and is residing in Asylum seeking
hostel with family.
Limited resources.
Volition
Motivated to engage in creative & imaginative play.
Likes outdoor activities & family activities.

Habituation

Unfamiliar with structured routine.

Performance Capacity
Strong gross motor skills.
Difficulty with all fine motor & following commands.
PHN suspects mild developmental delay.



Environment

Member of the traveling community.
Strong family support.


As children make transitions, the nature of their occupation changes, requiring child and family to learn new skills, habits and roles.
It is our role to facilitate occupational engagement, leading to skill mastery, role identity and attain meaningful life outcomes.

To facilitate the preparation for transition to preschool

(Rosenfeld 2005; Eke 2011; Wilson 2012)
The Short Child Occupational Profile (SCOPE)

Assesses occupational participation

Occupation focused

Strength focused

Theoretically driven

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The Miller Assessment for Pre-schoolers

Task and Observation based assessment

Indicates the child's current developmental trajectories

Pre-Schoolers bewteen 2.5 - 5.5yrs.

Assess behaviour during test - attention, social interactions and sensory reactivity.


To increase attention and concentration
To follow a structured routine
To improve fine and gross motor skills
To improve social interaction and communication
To provide various sensory activities
To explore coping strategies


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(Dankert 2003; Smith et al. 1998)

Develops interpersonal relationships, play interactions, social skills and self esteem building.

Improves attention and regulation levels for optimal activity engagement

Allows for decrease/increase in responsiveness to sensory stimuli
Overarching Goal:
Specific Goals:
(Kaley Isley et al. 2010)
(Adomat 2012; Bolton 2007; Booth 2007; Lane & Mistrett 2008)
Dankert, Heather L., Patricia L. Davies, and William J. Gavin. "Occupational therapy effects on visual-motor skills in preschool children." The American journal of occupational therapy 57.5 (2003): 542-549.

Dunbar, S. B. (2007) Occupational therapy models for intervention with children and families. Slack Incorporated.

Duncan, E. A. (Ed.). (2011). Foundations for practice in occupational therapy. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Eime, R. M., Young, J. A., Harvey, J. T., Charity, M. J., & Payne, W. R. (2013). A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activity, 10(1).

Eke, R. (2011). Handbook of child development and early education. Research to practice. Educational Review, 63(2), 252-254.

Fiss, A, Effgen, S, Page, J, & Shasby, S (2009) 'Effect of sensorimotor groups on gross motor acquisition for young children with Down syndrome', Pediatric Physical Therapy, 21, 2, pp. 158-166, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, EBSCOhost, viewed 31 March 2014
Gold, C., Wigram, T. and Elefant, C. (2006) 'Music therapy for autistic spectrum disorder', Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2.

Ganz, J. B., & Flores, M. M. (2008). Effects of the use of visual strategies in play groups for children with autism spectrum disorders and their peers. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38(5), 926-940.

Haley, L., & McKay, E. A. (2004). Baking gives you confidence: Users Views of Engaging in the Occupation of Baking. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67(3), 125-128.

Hong, C. S., Howard, L. and Hume, C. (2002) Occupational Therapy in Childhood, Whurr.

Howard, L. (2002). A survey of paediatric occupational therapists in the United Kingdom. Occupational Therapy International, 9(4), 326-343.

Kaley-Isley, L. C., Peterson, J., Fischer, C. and Peterson, E. (2010) ‘Yoga as a Complementary Therapy for Children and Adolescents: A Guide for Clinicians’ Psychiatry, 7(8), 20-31

Kemple, K. M., Batey, J. J. and Hartle, L. C. (2004) 'Music Play', Young Children, 31.

Kramer, P. (1999) Frames of reference for pediatric occupational therapy, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Kramer P. & Hinjosa J. (1999) Paediatric frames of reference for pediatric occupational therapy. second edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins: Maryland.





Adomat, D (2012) 'Drama's Potential for Deepening Young Children's Understandings of Stories',
Early Childhood Education Journal
, 40, 6, pp. 343-35

Bolton, G. (2007) 'A history of drama education: The search for substance' In L. Bresler (Ed.),
International handbook of research in arts education
(Vol. 1, pp. 45–62). Dordrecht:Springer

Booth, D. W. (2007) Story drama: Creating stories through role playing, Improvising, and reading aloud. Markham, Ontario: Pembroke Publishers

Bowyer, P. L., Kramer, J., Kielhofner, G., Maziero-Barbosa, V. and Girolami, G. (2007) Measurement Properties of the Short Child Occupational Profile (SCOPE), Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 27(4), 67-85.

Brown, G., Rodger, S., Brown, A., & Roever, C. (2005) A comparison of Canadian and Australian paediatric occupational therapists.
Occupational Therapy International
, 12(3), 137-161. doi:10.1002/oti.2

Bronson, M. B. and Bronson, M. (2000) Self-regulation in early childhood: Nature and nurture, Guilford Press.

Bryan, L. C., & Gast, D. L. (2000). Teaching on-task and on-schedule behaviors to high-functioning children with autism via picture activity schedules. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30(6), 553-567.

Cara, E. and MacRae, A. (2013) Psychosocial Occupational Therapy, An Evolving Practice, 3rd ed., USA: Dlemar Cengage Learning.

Case-Smith, J. and O'Brien, J. C. (2013) Occupational therapy for children, Elsevier Health Sciences.

Colangelo (1999) Biomechanical frame of reference. In Krammer and Hinjosa (eds) Frames of references for pediatric occupational therapy. Second edition.


(Gold et al. 2006; Kemple et al. 2004; Simpson & Keen 2011; Tam et al. 2007; Lew & Campbell 2005)
(McIntyre et al. 2006; Bronson and Bronson 2000)

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McIntyre, L. L., Blacher, J. and Baker, B. L. (2006) 'The transition to school: Adaptation in young children with and without intellectual disability',
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
, 50(5), 349-361.

Odawara, E. (2005). Cultural competency in occupational therapy: Beyond a cross-cultural view of practice. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59, 325–334.

Parush, S., Winokur, M., Goldstand, S. and Miller, L. J. (2002) Prediction of School Performance Using the Miller Assessment for Preschoolers (MAP: A Validity Study,
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy
, 56, 547-555.

Piek, J, Baynam, G, & Barrett, N (2006), 'The relationship between fine and gross motor ability, self-perceptions and self-worth in children and adolescents',
Human Movement Science
, 25, 1, pp. 65-75,


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(Rosenfeld 2005; Strong 2006; Eke 2011;
Wilson 2012, Eme et al 2013)
(Krammer et al. 1999)
(Cara & MacRae 2013; Hayley and McKay 2004; Odwara 2005)
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Incorporates communication, social interaction and shared experiences.

(Duncan 2002)
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Predominant occupation in childhood

Serves as a language for children, a symbolism that substitutes for words

Primary vehicle for development of skills

Fosters flexibility in thinking, adaptability, learning, problem solving, exploration and development of social, intellectual, emotional and physical skills

AND most importantly play is
FUN
…..

(Stagnitti 2004; Hong et al. 2002)
8 sessions once a week
1 hour and 15 minutes
Primary Care Centre
2 Occupational Therapists
1 Special Needs Assistant
(Bowyer et al. 2007; Majnemer 2010)
Looks at how a child's physical ability ( i.e. range of motion, strength and endurance) impacts on their occupational performance
(Krammer and Honjosa 1999)
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(Case-Smith & O'Brien 2013; Pierce 2009)
(Duncan 2011; Colangelo 1999)
(Case-Smith & O' Brien 2007)
Jimmy is from Ireland
Very supportive immediate family.
Support from SNA.
'A dance between the occupations of one individual and another that sequentially shapes the occupations of both.'
OT experts on occupation Family expert on child

Rapport building crucial

1 Hour + Therapist + Child = 1 hour therapy
1 Hour + Therapist + Child + Parent = 84 hours therapy

(Lee 2011)
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Transition and Development

Introduction to Children

Theoretical Considerations

Group description, session plans and rationale

Demonstration

Questions
Individuals within the group
Varied diagnosis
Each child has own developmental path
Various cultural backgrounds
Occupational preferences
Prioritisation; Physical needs (fine and gross motor), sensory needs, social interactions and communication
Risk Assessement
Top-down occupational approach adopted.
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Brother and son
Occupational Therapy intervention using food is beneficial because:
It is meaningful to all cultures
Improves self esteem and self confidence
Improves concentration
Builds Strength and co-ordination
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Temporal: Children are transitioning to preschool

Spatial: Environment set up to maximise the children's participation
75 minutes in total:

10 minutes: Warm up
10 minutes: Fine motor activity
10 minutes: Gross motor activity
10 minutes: Snack
10 minutes: Sensory Based Play
10 minutes: Social interaction and communication
10 minutes: Free play
5 minutes: Questions/Cool Down


Graded group approach - each child will benefit individually

Linked to each childs functional goals

Use of visual schedules for each session

Coping strategies

Use of Aistear guidelines






(Meyers 2010; NCCA 2009; Bryan & Gast 2000; Massey & Wheelers 2000; Ganz & Flores 2008)


Fun, engaging and appealing
Occupational Therapy intervention using arts and crafts improves:
Fine motor control
Gross motor control
Visual motor skills
Social development
Activities include:
Parachute games
Animal Races
Egg and Spoon Race

Activities include:
Collective collage
Painting & decorating personalized shoe box
Creating paper plate mask
Parachute Play has been shown to:
Develop coordination
Team work
Creativity
Occupational Therapy intervention using music improves:
Non verbal and verbal communication
Social Interaction
Learning
Gross Motor Skills via dance
Activities Include:
Making buns
Decorating Buns
Tea Party
Physical activity for children improves:
Psychological
Social benefits of participation
Activities Include:
Dance
Instrument making
Music game-Guess the sound
Singing
Activities Include:
Dress Up
Acting
Doll Play
Occupational Therapy intervention using Drama and story telling to improve:
Children's understanding
Educational Learning
Social Skills

Occupational therapy intervention using relaxation improves:
Emotional regulation
Concentration
Interaction with peers
Self-esteem
Activities Include:
Yoga
Gel beads
Guided imagery

Activities Include:
Wii Game
Board Game
Crab Crawl Races
Scooter Board Races

Occupational therapy intervention has been shown to improve :
Visual Perception skills
Attention
Cognition-Improves counting
Fine Motor Skills- manual dexterity
Hand eye co-ordination
Social Skills-turn taking



Occupational Therapy Group will conclude with party to:
Recognize children's achievement
Develop social skills
Encourage free play
(Parush et al. 2002; Hong et al. 2002).
Activities Include
Disco
Cookie decorating
Picnic & free play

Pierce, D. (2009) "Co-Occupation: The Challenges of Defining Concepts Original to Occupational Science" Journal of Occupational Science 16.3: 203-207

Pierce, D. (2003) Occupation by design: Building Therapeutic Power, Philadelphia: FA Davis Co.

Rosenfeld, A. (2005). The benefits of board games. Scholastic Parent & Child, 12(4), 52-54.

Schaaf, R. C., & Nightlinger, K. M. (2007). Occupational therapy using a sensory integrative approach: A case study of effectiveness. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(2), 239-246.

Sibley, B, & Etnier, J (2003) 'The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Cognition in Children: A Meta-Analysis', Pediatric Exercise Science, 15, 3, p. 243

Simpson, K. and Keen, D. (2011) 'Music interventions for children with autism: narrative review of the literature', Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 41(11), 1507-1514.

Smith D (1998) Delia’s how to cook. London: BBC Worldwide

Stagnitti, K. (2004) 'Understanding play: The implications for play assessment', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 51(1), 3-12.

Strong, T, & LeFevre, D (2006) 'Discovering the Benefits of Parachute Play',

Tam, C., Schwellnus, H., Eaton, C., Hamdani, Y., Lamont, A. and Chau, T. (2007) 'Movement‐to‐music computer technology: a developmental play experience for children with severe physical disabilities', Occupational therapy international, 14(2), 99-112.

Wilson, R. (2012) Nature and Young Children, Encouraging Creative Play and Learning in Natural Environments, 2nd ed., Oxon: Routledge..
Kraag, G., Zeegers, M. P., Kok, G., Hosman, C., & Abu-Saad, H. H. (2006). School programs targeting stress management in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis. Journal of School Psychology, 44(6), 449-472.

Lee, A. (2011)
Using the ICF-CY to organise characteristics of childrens functioning. Disability and Rehabilitation
. 33, no. 7, 605 - 616.

Lee, S. W., Taylor, R., & Kielhofner, G. (2009) Choice, knowledge, and utilization of a practice theory: A national study of occupational therapists who use the model of human occupation. Occupational Therapy in Healthcare,23(1), 60-71

Lew, J. C.-T. and Campbell, P. S. (2005) 'Children's natural and necessary musical play: Global contexts, local applications', Music Educators Journal, 91(5), 57-62.

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins:Maryland.Colangelo (1999) Biomechanical frame of reference. In Krammer and Hinjosa (eds) Frames of references for pediatric occupational therapy. Second edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins:Maryland.
.
Majnemer, A. (2010) 'Benefits of using outcome measures in pediatric rehabilitation', Physical & occupational therapy in pediatrics, 30(3), 165-167.

Massey, N. G., & Wheeler, J. J. (2000). Acquisition and generalization of activity schedules and their effects on task engagement in a young child with autism in an inclusive pre-school classroom. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 35(3), 326-335.

McIntyre, L. L., Blacher, J. and Baker, B. L. (2006) 'The transition to school: Adaptation in young children with and without intellectual disability', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 50(5), 349-361

Meyers, S. K. (2010) Community Practice in Occupational Therapy, A Guide to Serving the Community, Canada: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA. (2009). Aistear: The early childhood curriculum framework.



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(Pierce 2003)
Appeal
Intactness
Accuracy
Full transcript