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Fiela's Child IOP

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Romaissa Ghenai

on 22 September 2014

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Transcript of Fiela's Child IOP

Racial Disparity
The Patriarchal Role in the Van Rooyen’s
Superstitions & Myths
Group 2




Daniel Esquivel
Brandon Patron
Romaissa Ghenai
Kristen Nieves

Research
* South Africa 1870’s
* Ruling class was fundamentally white
* Of European descent
* Racial Inequality intertwined with high levels of class, and gender inequality.
* Black groups make up 87% of the population
* Earn 39% of total income in Africa.
* By the 1870’s various White ruled colonies had established (South Africa)
* White owners and higher positions always tried to extract labor from African American communities.

References ( 336-340)
Passage
– At the Van Rooyen household, Barta starts feeling ill and later confesses how she took the wrong child.

Quote
– “The rest was anger and turmoil and fragments of memory coming back to him. One man, one bloody man on a horse-cart, had the power to turn Benjamin Komotie into the ghost of Lukas Van Rooyen and he had had to walk the forest for years. He had had no choice.”

Research
- Nonetheless the ruling class was fundamentally White-dominated as its leading members were of European descent.

Connection
- Connection between passage and research show that the white man was working for the ruling class and he had the power to change the life of a black family.

References (61-66)
Passage
- While Feila is giving Benjamin a bath the night before he has to go visit the Magistrate.

Quote
- “Be brave, and remember not to call the Magistrate ‘master’, you call him ‘my lord.’”

Research
- This racial inequality is intertwined with high levels of class (and gender) inequality.

Connection
-Explains why Feila and blacks must call white people “Master” during the setting of the book.

References (61-66)
Passage
- While Fiela is giving Benjamin a bath the night before he has to go visit the Magistrate.

Quote
- “In case the Magistrate asks whether you have money. He must see the Komoties aren’t penniless.”

Research
- All black groups who make up 87% of the population earn only 39% of total income.

Connection
- Fiela wants to show the magistrate they have money, even though they are fairly poor and receive low income.

Literary Features
Metaphor
– “The words were torn from her like pieces of her own flesh” (p.337)
Connection between Fiela and Barta as when they took Benjamin from Fiela
Negative Diction
- “The rest was anger and turmoil and fragments of memory coming back to him.” (P.338)
Exemplifies the importance of racial disparity to the main conflict
Metaphor
– “…On Friday she will know it too, for an ewe knows her lamb.”
Refers to Benjamin as lamb and Barta as an ewe. Barta choses Benjamin as her child even though she knew it wasn’t.

Conclusion
Fielas Child IOP

* The main conflict of Fiela’s child originates from Racial Disparity.
* Racial Disparity usually relates to discrimination
* It can be seen through the census takers and through the Komtie’s lifestyle.
Research # 1
Patriarch
- “father and ruler of the family”
“It is a system of domination of man over women, which transcend different economic systems, eras, regions and class…Since every authority structure can have only one head, the woman was under the authority of her husband.”

Quote # 1
Scene:
Elias & Barta called by magistrate about lost child.

“Really Barta, you sound like an ox! Take them off!’
‘What will it look like if I go and stand barefoot before the magistrate, Elias?’
‘You will not be barefoot and you won’t sound like that either. Take them off! I’ve got an idea.” (76)

Literary Feature # 1
Simile:
comparison of Barta and ox

“Really Barta,
you sound like an ox!
Take them off!’”

Research #2
“Patriarchal is used ‘to refer to a family structure in which fathers control the lives and labor of family members-wife, children, slaves and servants.”

Quote #2
Scene
: Benjamin is with Van Rooyen; Strikes deal with Nina. Elias finds out about plan to escape.

“He had made up his mind, Lukas was going to work on the beams. When he was twelve years old, he had already been helping his father cut wood for a long time. If he taught Lukas and all went well, they might have some money to spare for a change.” (111)

Literary Feature # 2
Flashback:
Elias’s memory

“When
he was twelve years old
,
he had already been helping his father cut wood for a long time.”

Research #3
“through the breadwinner
construct men can, or could, achieve a ‘sense of masculine validation through their ability to feed and support their family’.”

Quote #3
Scene:
Van Rooyen discover their child has gone missing.

“On the other hand it meant
putting him up and the house was too small as it was. The children were getting big and before long he would have to get some planks and add a third room…He started thinking further ahead; the only way a man could make himself a decent bit of extra in the forest was to buy a gun and shoot elephants.” (11-12)

Literary Feature #3
Motif:
elephant
“the only way a man
could make himself a decent bit of extra in the forest was to buy a gun and shoot
elephants
.”

Conclusion


* Male dominance over women
* Head of family controlled the family
* Breadwinner

Matriarchal
Roles
Who:
fiela, her children, and selling
When:
they are waiting for the cart to come so they can buy pollie
Where:
at the main road that branches off to her house
What: waiting for the cart to come so they can buy a
female ostrich to mate with kicker
Why:
This passage shows how Feila defies the traditional matriarchal roles of South Africa at the time by being the primary person in the household that takes care of the families income. It also characterizes Feila as a hard working woman and tells why she needs to take on the male role in the house.

Passage:
chapter 3, pages 12-14


Pg. 13:
“to get hold of him, she had to arm herself with a whitethorn branch and sit in the aloe hills above the nest of the wild ostrich pair for days until she had finally managed to steal three chicks to bring home.”

* This passage contributes to her characterization
by showing what lengths she goes to too provide for her family
* This also shows how she has taken on the male role
* Man would be doing this

Reference # 1
Reference # 2
Pg.14 “To have one breeding bird was good, but to have a pair of breeding birds was as good as having a trunk full of money under the bed.”

• Concerned with matters outside of the home
• Simile= but to have a pair of breeding birds was as good as having a trunk full of money under the bed

Reference #3
Pg.184:
“Fiela laid down new rules for Workwekrall: first of all, Selling’s work bench was shifted to the west of the house. Ostriches did not like to be watched at such times; they were not like dogs and other animals that had no pride.”

* She is laying down rules like the man would
* Makes Selling move his bench (telling him what to do)
* Personification= ostriches have pride
* Identifies with ostriches
* She has a lot of pride

Superstitions and Myths
What was easy to understand and what was difficult in relation to social and cultural context and issues?

* Understanding dependent on personal beliefs
*Affected by culture/location/time

Astrid Rivera
Gabriela Beverly
Gail Figeroa
Brian Tagle
Ernesto Chacon

Passage #1 pgs. 44-45
* Van Rooyen argument over elephant
* “Nina came in like a shadow from the dark. ‘Why are you making such a noise?’ she wailed. ‘There is the most beautiful owl sitting on the shed, hooting.’ ‘Chase him away! Barta said, frightened. ‘He’ll bring us bad luck!’” (45)

* Owls associated with death.
* Owls hooting/screeching at night = bad luck.

Analysis:
Diction
* “Nina came in like a
shadow
from the
dark
. ‘Why are you making such a noise?’ she
wailed
. ‘There is the most
beautiful
owl sitting on the shed, hooting.’ ‘Chase him away!’ Barta said,
frightened
. ‘He’ll bring us
bad luck
!’”
* Negative diction in contrast to Nina’s
* Highlights the bad luck Barta believes in
* Supports claim on dependence

* Elias & pit in the Forest
* “’Nina, what’s the matter?’ he asked. ‘Pa is a dirty swine.’ Just that. ‘Why do you say that?’ ‘It was a trap. An elephant trap.’ ‘How do you know?’ ‘I went there. There’s a dead elephant calf lying in the pit.’” (204)
* “’… I’m telling you, the bigfeet have got it in for me, they’ve marked me, they’re going to trample me!’” (206)
* “’Pa has never been that lazy. I think he’s afraid that the elephants might really have put a mark on him.’” (211)

Passage #2 pgs. 193-211
* Superstition – killing compromised animal/elephant = misfortune

Research:
Elephant Revenge
* “’Nina, what’s the matter?’ he asked. ‘
Pa is a dirty swine.
’ Just that. ‘Why do you say that?’ ‘It was a trap. An elephant trap.’ ‘How do you know?’ ‘I went there. There’s a dead elephant calf lying in the pit.’”
* Nina’s realization
* Elias characterization
* Leads to Elias’s paranoia

Analysis:
Metaphor
* “’… I’m telling you, the bigfeet have got it in for me,
they’ve marked me
, they’re going to trample me!’”
* “’Pa has never been that lazy. I think he’s afraid that the
elephants might really have put a mark on him.
’” (
personification
)
* Elephant memory

Elias’s Paranoia
Passage #3 pgs. 270-272
* Elias goes to Hans Oukas (ancestors – Outeniqua tribe; never hindered by elephants)
* “’It’s not that we Outeniquas walk the Forest without fear of the bigfeet; the bigfeet are the old people of the Forest, you walk their paths with respect and stand aside when they want to come past. I believe they’ve marked you, Master Elias. Why? What have you done to them?’” (271)
* “’How do you stop them from smelling you?’ … ‘First, pick yourself a nice bunch of buchu, bruise the leaves, take off all your clothes and rub it well in to your skin. That’s the first thing. Then take the dung of a bigfoot and mix it with a little mud – more dung than mud – and rub yourself with that till only your eyes show, then you can put on your clothes again and you can walk right past them with the wind in the wrong direction and they will not smell you.’” (271-72)

* “Elephants never forget”
* Stonger in matriarchal elephants
* Remember scent

Research:
Elephant Memory
* “’It’s not that we Outeniquas walk the Forest without fear of the bigfeet;
the bigfeet are the old people of the Forest,
you walk their paths with respect and stand aside when they want to come past. I believe they’ve marked you, Master Elias. Why? What have you done to them?’”
* Respect exhibited by tribe members
* Home free
* Elias = NOT home free
* Connection to previous passage (calf/pit)
* … Hence Elias’s entire trip to Deep Walls


Analysis:
Metaphor
Research:
Owl Superstition
Conclusion
* Through Nina – beliefs vary amongst people
* Belief in superstitions more prevalent back then
* Dependent on person

Marriage:
Kamotie
Introduction
What was easy to understand and what was difficult in relation to social and cultural context and issues?
* Marriage: Komoetie family

Research #1
* Men tend livestock, provide for family
* Women are nurturers
* Males need to dominate

Quote #1
Setting: Fiela & Selling discussing the ostriches

“There was
not much left
of Selling, his health had been
poor
for years but his hands could still work even if there were days when it took her a lot of talking to get them going, Ill-health or no
ill-health
, Selling had to do his bit.”
(Page 12)

Analysis #1
* Negative Diction-
"Not much left, poor health"
* Role reversal
* Opposite of traditional marriage

Research #1
* Marriage is sacred in Africa
* Communal relationship which bonds two people
* True sign of commitment

Quote #2
Setting: Fiela had a flashback about Sellings past

Then Petrus came and said Selling was making the new road over the mountains.
‘I must go to him, Master Petrus.’
‘You cant, Fiela. I will try and find out how he is from time to time.’
‘I must go to him, Master Petrus’
“Fiela, it is hard to accept, but Selling is a convict. There are many convict gangs with their guards beyond the mountain- it is no place for a woman.”
‘I must see Selling.’
(116)


Analysis #2
* Characterization of Fiela
* Passionate wife
* Hard-headed

Research #2
* Men are by custom head of household
* Male hold power over all estates
* Women are responsible for chores and child care


Quote #3
Scene- Fiela and Selling both working on the field
“What are you talking about now, Fiela?”
‘I want to buy the land the Laghaans are on.’
“You must be dreaming.”
How many times has Master Koos been here to ask you to sell back his twelve morgan of your late fathers? He will never let you have another eight, they do not want to see bits of land in Coloured hands any more."
(32)

Analysis #3
* Sellings tone- logical, skeptical
* Fielas tone- ambitious, determined
* Fiela takes charge in making decisions


Conclusion
* Both Fiela and Selling work as a unit
* A good relationship is defined by its high and low points
* Many customs were the opposite of what they were truly meant to be

Marriage &
Family Customs
Introduction
* Elias & Barta
* Marriage and family customs
Passage #1
"He could swear she sometimes counted the beams to see how many he had finished. It had to end. He had two sons now bringing in food, it was no longer necessary for him to kill himself working."
Research #1
* The father is the primary financial provider for the families
* Children worked in their houses and their farms
Connection #1
* Man was "breadwinner"
* Woman stayed home
* Elias makes beams and thinks his sons should work.
* Elias thinks he can be laid back

How:
Elias makes beams
Who:
Elias and Barta
What:
Their marriage's gender roles
Why:
Man usually works
Literary Feature #1
Hyperbole:
exaggerating how much Barta works
Passage #2
"Since when has a brat got a
will of her own?"

"When she had to have a hiding,
you had to stalk her with the ox rein, for if she got a chance to get away, it took you half a day to get hold of her again. And by that time you were too tired to beat her properly in any case."
Research #2
* Girls chose based on who they loved enough to be with forever.

Connection #2
* Love and kind bonds
* Elias is the opposite
* Opposing to traditional
times
Who:
Elias
What:
Abusive father and husband
Why:
Rude to his family
How:
Treats and speaks to his family like scum
Literary
Feature # 2
Simile:
Compares Nina to a goat
"Thin and wispy, just like a goat, always climbing and jumping. When she h to have a hiding, you had to stalk her with the ox rein, for if she got a chance to get away, it took you half a day to get hold of her again."
"...it was no longer necessary for him to kill himself working"
Elias and Barta
Passage #3
" 'Really, Barta, you sound like an ox! Take them off!'
'What will it look like if i go and stand barefoot before the magistrate, Elias?'
'You will not be barefoot and you wont sound like that either. Take them off! I've got an idea.'
He pulled up some grass from beside the rod and stuffed it into the toe of shoe until they fitted tightly on her feet and then it was better.'

Research #3
* Husbands were meant to take care of the family as a whole
* One of the few times we see Elias as whats expected in the marriage
Connection #3
* Elias guides Barta to help her present herself to the magistrate
Who:
Elias
What:
Elias showing rare sympathy
When:
On their way to the magistrate
Where:
The forest
Why:
To find lukas
How:
Putting grass until the shoe fit
Literary
Feature #3
Simile:
compares the sound of Barta's feet to those of an ox

"'Really, Barta, you sound like an ox! Take them off!'"
Conclusion
* Elias & Barta
* Abusive
* Opposing traditions
Research
* South Africa 1870’s
*Christianity was most prominent in the
Southern region of Africa
* 33% of Africa’s population is a part of some form of Christianity
* Daniel in the den is a biblical reference to Book of Daniel: Chapter 6
* Imprisoned for worshipping God
* Considered to be blameless
* Jesus Christ was crucified on a Friday
* Puff-adder is a venomous viper native in Morocco, Arabia, and throughout Africa
* Snake in the bible is depicted as crafty, treacherous and deceiving, Adam & Eve
Reference #1
Passage
– This is the passage after Lucas Van Rooyen disappears
when it switches to Fiela looking back on the moments before Benjamin disappeared and how she should have noticed the bad omens.
Quote
– “The puff-adder at the back door the day before had taken a dozen blows to smash it’s head in … On top of that the hawk came and caught the most beautiful chicken of the whole brood” (pg.11)
Research
- Puff-adder is a venomous viper native in Morocco, Arabia, and throughout Africa. Snake in the bible is depicted as depicted as crafty, treacherous and deceiving.
Connection
– This shows why Fiela saw it as a bad omen since she is religious and in Christianity snakes are saw as evil and treacherous.

Reference #2
Passage
– In this passage Fiela is recounting the times she would visit Selling
when he was imprisoned for the murder of two boys.
Quote
- “When she came to the edge, she found she was looking down on a picture that had hung in Mr. Hood’s classroom at Avontur years ago: the picture of Daniel in the lion’s den.”(pg.114)
Research
- Daniel in the den is a biblical reference to Book of Daniel: Chapter 6, Daniel was blameless - and accused by evil people.
Connection
- This shows that this wasn’t a reference to some regular picture but a depiction of a chapter in the Bible and that it helps show how Fiela characterizes Selling.

Reference #3
Passage
– This is when Benjamin first decided to stay
with Kaliel so he could live on the coast, at the specific moment the quote is said Kaliel is explaining his “curse”
Quote
- “Seems to me I’ll have to tell you. A ship that sails on Friday is an unlucky ship” (pg.266)
Research
– It is considered unlucky by sailors to set sail on a Friday because Jesus Christ was crucified on a Friday
Connection
– This explains why these sailors have this superstition and adds on to the motif of Christianity which pops up in all three settings that Lucas/Benjamin ends up in.

Literary Features
Foreshadowing
– “… On top of that the
hawk came and caught the most beautiful chicken of the whole brood” (pg.11)
Allusion
- “When she came to the edge, she found she was looking down on a picture that had hung in Mr. Hood’s classroom at Avontur years ago: the picture of Daniel in the lion’s den.”(pg.114)
Pathetic Fallacy
– “ He got up and went outside into the storm… there were things about himself he did not understand – it made him restless.”

Conclusion
* South Africa during the 1800’s was patriarchal
* Feila does not conform to the normal Matriarchal roles of the time
* Feila is a hardworking woman who goes to any lengths to provide for her family

Research
* What are matriarchal roles?
* Womens roles were primarily domestic
* Patriarchal society
* Not to concern themselves with matters outside the home
* During late 1800’s roles began to change

Racial Disparity
Introduction
* The main conflict in Fiela Child by Dalene Matthee is the racial disparity.
* Racial disparity can refer to race, class, and gender.
8 Racial disparity can apply to discrimination or not.
* Racial disparity shown when the census takers take Ben from Fiela.
Research
America
* Whites where superior in the united states
in the mid 1900s.
* Whites and blacks were not allowed to mix with one another.
* More whites than blacks
Africa
* White supremacy
* British colonized
* Racism in Africa traces back to several centuries ago.
* More blacks than whites

Reference #1
(19-26)
Passage
- where Benjamin is taken from Fiela by the census takers.
Quote-
“what about the colored children who live on white people land and
in there homes together with the white children.”
Research
- Rosa Parks was arrested and mistreated for not giving up her seat on a bus to a white man.
Connection
- In the book Fiela Child ben is taken away from Fiela because he is a white child and Fiela is colored. In 1955 Rosa Park got arrested for being colored and not moving to the back of the bus and giving her sit to a white person.

Passage
- where Benjamin is taken from Fiela by the census takers.
Quote
- “you said you found him… I think your lying” pg.22
Research
- when Michael Brown accomplices got investigated and
the cops doubted his version of the fight between the white cop and Brown.
Connection
- In Fiela Child the census takers don’t believe that Fiela found Benjamin because she is colored just like in the case of Michael Browns fight with the white cop.

Reference #2
(19-26)
Passage
- where Benjamin is taken from Fiela by the census takers.
Quote
- “you have a white child on your land and in your house among your own children and you know as well that isn't right.”
Research
-whites where allowed to have colored in there properties and lands, they used the colored as slaves or for work.
Connection
- Fiela was not allowed to keep a white child but the whites where able to, in America and In south Africa whites used blacks as there personal servants, blacks where like properties.

Reference #3
(19-26)
Literary Features
“Amongst you people” pg.20
“but that’s a white child” pg.21
“listen here, woman” pg.21
“very few of you colored people know your day of birth”
The quotes above show connotative diction and negative diction.
Shows white supremacy .
Making Fiela seem inferior and with no saying.
“no. an ewe that throws away her lamb does not turn back”pg.25
Metaphor
Shows that Benjamin's real parents didn’tt want him.
Benjamin being the lamb and ewe being Benjamin
real parents.

Introduction
What was easy to understand and what was difficult in relation to social and cultural context and issues?

* Patriarchal role

Superstitions and Myths
Conclusion
* The prominence of Christianity in South Africa
* The motif of Christianity in the book
* The tying quality of religion
* Could be the only true identity

Daniel Esquivel
Astrid
Rivera
Gabriela Beverly
Kristen Nieves
Gail
Figeroa
Romaissa Ghenai
Brian
Tagle
Brandon
Patron
Full transcript