Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

UNIT 6: REGIONALISM & REALISM

No description
by

Tiffany Hallin

on 2 March 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of UNIT 6: REGIONALISM & REALISM

Definition and Characteristics
Literature Panel Project
Midwest






South
New England






West
Regional and Realistic Writers
"...vernacular cultures as enclaves of tradition..."
Realism
Big Names
Getting to know Regionalism and Realism
Task


Requirements


Panel Discussion


Purpose
American literary movement of the late 1800s
What is it?
Regionalism
Groups and Schedule
Let's get to work
Focus


Setting


Characters


Narrator


Plots


Themes


"A White Heron"



"The Notorious Jumping
Frog of Calaveras County"



"The Outcasts
of Poker Flat"


UNIT 6: REGIONALISM & REALISM
Helpful Hints for a Great Grade
Reminders
Detail


Participation


Depth of Thought


Speaking and Listening
Characters
Dialect
Customs
Topography
Features particular to a specific region
Sectional differences
Finding a national identity
Nature and its limitations
Remote; inaccessible
Setting integral to story; can become a character itself
Stereotypical or stock characters
Characters that can break free from the "old ways"
Educated observer from beyond the region
"Nothing happens"
Revolve around the community and its rituals
Antipathy to change
Nostalgia
Tension/conflict between old and new
1. Representation of middle class life
2. Focus on "the immediate, the here and now, the specific action, the verifiable consequence"
3. Growth of industrialism and urbanization: population grows, more readers, culture shifts
1. Detail provides verisimilitude
2. Character > plot
3. Complex ethical choices
4. Complex characters: relation to nature, each other, social class, the past
5. Class important
6. Plausible events
7. Diction is the natural vernacular
8. Objectivity
Sarah Orne Jewett
"A White Heron"
Mark Twain
"The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County"
Bret Harte
"The Outcasts of Poker Flat"
"Under the Lion's Paw"
Hamlin Garland
Kate Chopin
"The Story of an Hour"
Read a work of short fiction from the Regional or Realist literature and conduct a panel discussion.
Context: provide information about your story's region during this time period for historical and social context. Highlight specific details which are applicable to your story. For example, women's rights at the turn of the century is essential to understanding "The Story of an Hour."
Summary: Provide a synopsis of the events of your story. Include key details without taking the entire presentation time on recounting the entirety of the plot.
Does it fit into Regional or Realist writing? Explain by showing which pieces of the story match characteristics either or both.
Theme and Message: Tell us what you believe to be the central idea of the story as well as the purpose for it being written. Answer the question "Why should we care?"
Evaluation: Provide a review and rating of your story, individually or as a group.
All information must be presented to the class as a panel. You will seated in the front of the room and discuss all required elements as a group. You must also conduct a question and answer section on your story.
Why, Mrs. Schultz? Why must you make us read, write, and (gasp!) speak in front of the class?
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.B
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
To practice
1.proving your point with evidence,
2. using your sleuthing skills to figure out why things matter, and
3. putting on your judging caps to become critical evaluators.
And to become
1. better at discussing topics that are complex with a bunch of your classmates and not just your friends,
2. independent, responsible, and prepared, since people are counting on you,
3. confident in expressing your ideas ( remember Keating and Uncle Walt--they would want you to YAWP!)
Tianna, Zack B.,
Aaron, Andrea
Gracie, Katy,
Whitney
"The Story of an Hour"
and "A Respectable Woman"


"Under the Lion's Paw"




"A Rose for Emily"
Dylan, Patrick,
Seth H., Levi
Sean, Cruze,
David
Brett, Elias,
Emily, Conner
Tatum, Blake,
Courtney, Cooper
Sera, Maggie,
D.
Tucker, Zach M.,
Grace L., Rocky
Holly, Zach,
Savanna
Thomas, Seth S.,
Craig, Madi
Work Cited
---. "Regionalism and Local Color Fiction, 1865-1895."
Public.wsu.edu.
Washington State University, 20 July 2013. Web. 22 March 2015.
Campbell, Donna M. "Realism in American Literature, 1860-1890."
Public.wsu.edu.
Washington State University, 4 July 2013. Web. 22 March 2015.
Grace, Ally,
Alyssa
Sam, Cody,
Jared
Alex, Sonja
Brock, Falyn,
Kaitlin
Full transcript