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RDG 507 Content-Area Writing

Key quotes and strategies from Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 from Content-Area Writing: Every Teacher's Guide.
by

Jennie Clausen

on 24 March 2016

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Transcript of RDG 507 Content-Area Writing

Content- Area Writing: Every Teacher's Guide
The Writing Process
More Meaningful Writing
Writing
Workshops

Big
Projects

Testing
Key Quotes
"Kids expect the red pen to come down hard. And traditionally, teachers often think they must spend hours at home marking up papers. Students don't learn from it; it sends a negative signal that you're about fault finding, not helping them learn."
"Focus on just one aspect of writing at a time to help students notice it in their writing."
"Sue makes sure that when she gives pairs or groups a task, she moves around the class quickly at first. to see how kids are doing. This way she can give guidance more strategically."
The Writing Process is MORE that FOUR steps!
1. Before-Writing Activities
Anticipation Guide
Four Corners

2. Gathering Information
Jigsaw
Research/Internet

3. Organizing
Using Samples

4. Getting Ideas Down
Four Card Stud

5. Letting Early Drafts Rest
Plan a break
6. Reviewing
Make it REAL

7. Revising
Small Group
One-on-one

8. Polishing
Read Aloud

9. Publishing
In Class
Adult Panels
Other Students
Advocacy
Contests
Experts
Moving away from traditional writing projects
And Towards MEANINGFUL writing
Faction
RAFT
Publishing
Webpages
All the writing your students do should not be research papers!
Research papers are HARD!
Fact + Imagination = Faction

Students chose a factual topic
and develop it into a fictional
writing piece.
Role
Audience
Format
Topic
Brochure
Newspaper Cover
Movie Poster
Magazine Spread
Advertisement
Use your school
"Computer People"
iWeb
Prezi
Writing Workshops
Checks progress
Identifies strengths and weaknesses.
Indvidualizes instruction
Efficient
How?
Why?
Build engagement
Give choices
Allow for individual goal setting
Brief, focused teaching
Modeling
Conferences
Conference Records
Writing Folders
Sharing the Results
Time?
Once a week.
Keep conferences brief.
Allow writing to take place outside of class.
Don't start with a huge project
Do this when it fits into your teaching style and schedule.
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."
~Margaret Mead, American Anthropologist
Ambitious Public Writing Projects
Multip Genre P
Multigenre Projects
Social Action Paper
Learning Fair
The I-Search Paper
Multiple pieces of writing centered around one general topic.
Page 163-164 offers ideas
for different writing types
Using classroom lessons to address real world issues.
A "science fair" for writing.

Family history
History
Biology (genetics)
Foreign Language
English
Art
Most similar to the traditional research paper
BUT:
Topics are unrestricted
Written in 1st person
Writing for Tests and Assessments
Limitations:
1. Unfamiliar Purpose
2. Audience is limited
3. You get what you ask for
4. Unrealistic
5. Only a snapshot
How to get the most out of Assessment Writing
1. Focus on the BIG ideas
2. Use higher level skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation)
3. Build in more time (take home)
4. Allow oral presentations
5. Require reflection
Writing the BEST Rubrics:
1. Involve Students
2. Keep it simple
3. Content + Writing Skills
4. Leave a Blank for Flexibility
Reading Response #7
Written Conversation
Full transcript