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Working in Groups

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Iman Azman

on 19 January 2016

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Transcript of Working in Groups

Creating a positive team environment
Advantages of Group Work
Greater output

Increased creativity

Reduced bias

Increased risk taking

Higher commitment
6 Skills for Effective Group Work
1.
Cooperation
Contribute equally to completing the project

2.
Assertiveness
Share your opinions, thoughts, and ideas

3.
Open-mindedness
Be open to learning others’ opinions, thoughts, and ideas, and putting them into action

4.
Active listening
Ask questions for clarification and give others the respect to hear their opinions, thoughts, and ideas

5.
Commitment / motivation
Stay on track and fulfilling your assigned responsibilities within the group

6.
Open communication
Be honest and clear with your thoughts and opinions and being receptive of others’

Stages of Group Development
(Tuckman & Jensen, 1977)
Group Dynamics
Explains behaviour and interactions of individuals in groups

Brainstorming vs. groupthink
Dealing with Conflict
Watch out for the STORMING phase!

Conflict can be an extension of creativity

It should be expected - it usually happens

Resolving of conflict should be done in a way that ensures:
1. That the group can still achieve it’s goal(s)
2. That group member’s ideas, feelings, and opinions are respected
Tips for Giving Feedback
Focus on the behaviour

Use “when you…. I….” statements

Talk in private

Start and end with a positive

Know your limits
Agenda
Why is group work important?
Philosophy of Group Work
Group learning involves shared values, resources, and ways of doing things. 

Effective groups learn to succeed by combining these factors.

Groups are only effective if they accept and respect the differences of each member


Working in Groups
Workshop Ground Rules
Participate

No Ins and Outs

No Cellphones

Stick Around!
Philosophy of Group Work

Advantages of Group Work

Stages of Group Development

Skills for Effective Group Work

Group Dynamics

Dealing with Conflict

Tips for Giving Feedback
Checklist for Group Projects
Introductions

Set group rules and guidelines

Set goals and objectives

Assign roles and tasks

Make a timeline

Complete assigned tasks

Regroup

Group review and feedback

Finalize
What is learned -
Factual material as well as the process

What is produced -
Written paper, presentation that was assigned
The two major objectives of group work are:
Reduced workload

Improved communication

Better solutions

Increased resources

Develop new skills
Forming
Storming
Norming
Performing
Adjourning
Each group member takes on different roles
Assigned
Roles
Unassigned
Roles
Recorder
Time Keeper
Researcher
Editor
Writer
Presenter
Leader
Encourager
Mediator
Observer
Follower
Brainstorming
Process of exploring various ideas of each group member in order to uncover the best or hidden one(s)

Uncover different points of views or have ideas which individuals may not have thought about
A process of altering opinions, views, and/or perspectives to agree with the group consensus

Causes the group to make hasty, irrational decisions and not reach its full potential
Groupthink
Successful group work is based on cooperation - not competition
Positive Strategies
Negative Strategies
Listening

Collaborating

Compromising

Being Problem-Focused

Empathizing
Accommodating or avoiding

Competing

Focusing on Individuals

Being Defensive

Blaming
Summary
Philosophy of Group Work

Advantages of Group Work

Stages of Group Development

Skills for Effective Group Work

Group Dynamics

Dealing with Conflict

Tips for Giving Feedback
Sign up for a 1-on-1 study skills appointment at the LSS Help Desk on your way out!
WANT THE SLIDES?
Find them on our website at carleton.ca/lss.
COMPLETED 5 WORKSHOPS?
Add the "Skills for Academic Success Certificate" to your Co-Curricular Record.
WANT MORE HELP?
Attendance Procedure
Provide your name, student #, and reason for attending
Please remain seated until your name is called
Have your student card ready




Have a great day!
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(Toseland & Rivas, 2005)
(Merriam-Webster online “Brainstorming”, n.d.)
(Merriam-Webster online “Groupthink”, n.d.)
(Ettington & Camp, 2002)
(Tuckman, 1965)
(Ettington & Camp, 2002)
(Ettington & Camp, 2002)
(Ettington & Camp, 2002)
References
Brainstorming. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster online. Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brainstorming.

Carnegie Mellon University. (n.d.). What are the benefits of group work? Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation. Retrieved from https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/design/instructionalstrategies/groupprojects/benefits.html.

Ettington, D. R., & Camp, R. R. (2002). Facilitating transfer of skills between group projects and work teams. Journal of Management Education, 26(4), 356-379. doi: 10.1177/105256290202600404.

Groupthink. (n.d.). In Merriam-Webster online. Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/groupthink.

Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2005). An Introduction to Group Work Practice, 5/e. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Tuckman, B. W. (1965). Developmental sequence in small groups. Psychological Bulletin, 63(6), 384-399. doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy.library.carleton.ca/10.1037/h0022100.

Tuckman, B. W. & Jensen, M.C. (1977). Stages of small group development revisited. Group and Organizational Studies, 2: 419-427.


(Carnegie Mellon University, n.d.)
(Carnegie Mellon University, n.d.)
(Carnegie Mellon University, n.d.)
Group Activity
Lost at Sea
Divide into groups of 3 - 5

Listen to the scenario, then discuss as a group.

Rank each item by importance to your survival.
Group Activity
"Lost at Sea"
Coast Guard Rankings:
Scenario
You are planning a sailing trip with three friends across the Atlantic Ocean. Because none of you have any previous sailing experience, you have hired an experienced captain and crew.

Unfortunately, in the mid-Atlantic a fire breaks out on the ship and the captain and crew are lost whilst fighting the fire. Much of the boat is destroyed and is slowly sinking.

Your location is unclear because navigational and radio equipment have been damaged in the fire. Your best guess is that you are many hundreds of miles from the nearest landfall.

You and your friends have managed to save 7 items, undamaged after the fire. In addition, you have a small rubber life raft and a box of matches.

Your task is to rank the 7 items in terms of their importance for you, as you wait to be rescued. Place the number 1 by the most important item, the number 2 beside the second most important item and so forth until you have ranked all 7.
Adapted from: Insight by Grahame Knox is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)
1. A Shaving Mirror
2. A 10 litre can of oil/gasoline mixture
3. A 25 litre container of water
4. A case of army rations
5. 20 square feet of plastic sheeting
6. 2 boxes of chocolate bars
7. An ocean fishing kit with a pole.
Adapted from: Insight by Grahame Knox is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)
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