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SDHC SIXTH GRADE ELA PRACTICE TEST

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Anna Marie Garrett

on 4 June 2013

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Transcript of SDHC SIXTH GRADE ELA PRACTICE TEST

Sixth Grade ELA Practice Test Cell Phone Usage: Are there any dangers?


Glossary

Electromagnetic: a force of nature that causes the interaction between electrically charged particles
Emit: to give or send out
DNA: genetic material in cells that can reproduce itself
FCC: an agency of the United States government responsible for regulating all forms of communication (radio, TV, cable)
Free radicals: an atom or group of atoms with an unpaired electron making it unstable
General public: the community or group of people as a whole
Radiation: describes a process in which energetic particles or waves travel through space (1) There was a time when people did not realize that smoking cigarettes was harmful. The general public did not know that smoking led to lung cancer. Today, labels are placed on cigarette boxes so that people know there is a risk of cancer. In the past, cigarette companies published reports saying cigarettes were safe. These reports misled the public. Teaching the public about the connection between cigarettes and lung cancer took many years. Just as people didn’t know about the dangers of smoking at one time, people are unaware of another common danger: cell phones! The major issue with cell phone use is contact with radiation. (2) Cell phones give off electromagnetic radiation. Radiation can cause cells to become unstable. How does it work? Radiation from cell phones produces free radicals. Free radicals are invisible radio waves. Radio waves can damage our DNA’s ability to make copies of it. Also, researchers have discovered that younger people are more easily hurt by cell phone radiation because of their smaller heads and thinner skulls. This allows radiation easier contact with young peoples’ brains. Think about this: wherever your cell phone is on your body is where your body radiation hits you…and you normally hold a cell phone at your ear. (3) Dr. Davis, a scientist, looked at all available studies and noticed that people who used cell phones heavily over a ten-year period were at greater risk of brain tumors. The FCC (Federal Communication Commission), which is responsible for protecting people when it comes to media, uses safety standards based on studies from 1989, which are outdated. The amount of radiation our bodies take in is called the specific absorption rate (SAR). The FCC bases safe SAR standards on military men, who are usually taller and heavier than most people. New studies are needed to see how cell phones affect average-sized people and children. 1. What is the purpose of the introductory paragraph?

A. to persuade people to not smoke
B. to explain about misleading advertising
C. to describe the best cell phones to use
D. to inform people about the dangers of cell phones 2. The author is thinking about adding a sentence to his essay. Which sentence shows the correct use of a comma?

A. However, an industry, study was used to declare safety to consumers.
B. However an industry study was used, to declare safety to consumers.
C. However, an industry study was used to declare safety to consumers.
D. However, an industry study, was used to declare safety to consumers. 3. Read this excerpt from the passage.

Free radicals are invisible radio waves. Radio waves can damage our DNA’s ability to make copies of it.

Which pronoun could replace the underlined words in the sentence?

A. It; itself
B. Its; itself
C. They; itself
D. They're; itself 4. Which sentence represents the concluding sentence of the entire article, “Cell Phone Usage: Are there any dangers?”

A. There was a time when people did not realize that smoking cigarettes was harmful.
B. New studies are needed to see how cell phones affect average-sized people and children.
C. Electromagnetic radiation is released from cell phones.
D. The major issue with cell phone use is contact with radiation. 5. Read this sentence from the passage.

Cell phones give off electromagnetic radiation.

What is its function in paragraph 2?

A. commentary
B. supporting detail
C. topic sentence
D. hook 6. What is the tone of this article?

A. angry
B. sad
C. sarcastic
D. serious 7. The emitted radiation excites or vibrates our cells. This excitement to our cells has negative consequences to our bodies.

The author wants to explain radiation further by adding a sentence. Which transition word should be added before the underlined word to make the ideas flow better?

A. However,
B. On the other hand,
C. In conclusion,
D. Therefore, 8. Which sentence could be added to paragraph 2 to maintain a formal tone?

A. Radiation is crazy dangerous, so kids need to be especially careful.
B. Being aware of the dangers of cell phones can help kids stay safe.
C. Cell phones are fun, but brain tumors aren't!
D. Tell your parents to stop using cell phones, or else. 9. How did the author organize the information in the first paragraph?

A. compare/contrast
B. cause/effect
C. narrative
D. definition 10. Which of the following sentences best supports the author’s claim that cell phones are dangerous?

A. These reports misled the public.
B. New studies are needed to see how cell phones affect average-sized people and children.
C. Radio waves can damage our DNA’s ability to make copies of it.
D. The amount of radiation our bodies take in is called the specific absorption rate (SAR). Directions: Read the passage, “Bloodletting and Leeches.” Select the best answer for each of the questions that follow the passage.

Bloodletting and Leeches





Bloodletting, the idea of drawing blood on purpose, was normal in ancient medicine. Sick patients were thought to have an unequal amount of fluids or “humors” in their bodies. Doctors thought they could balance the fluid by taking some out.

Most blood letters would open a vein in the arm, leg, or neck with small knife called a lancet. They would tie off the area with a tourniquet and strike diagonally or lengthwise into the vein. (A perpendicular cut might cause a patient to bleed out and die!) Afterward, they would collect the blood in measuring bowls. Bleeding was as trusted and popular in ancient days as aspirin is today. Complex laws for bloodletting were laid out. Medieval monks bled each other several times a year to maintain health. Doctors devised charts letting people know what time of the year was best to go to the doctor to be bled.

Another tool of ancient doctors was a small bloodsucking creature called a leech. The leech was used in places too sensitive or difficult for the lancet or other bloodletting instruments. Physicians applied leeches to areas such as "the gums, lips, nose, or fingers," according to a medical text from 1634. The common leech produces natural anti-coagulants, chemicals that stop blood from clumping, and pain relievers, so patients bleed easily and generally feel nothing during the procedure. Leeches became popular in the 19th century -- so much so that the species became endangered in Europe. In 1833 alone, French doctors imported 41,500,000 leeches. Eventually the procedure was largely abandoned, along with other forms of bloodletting. It wasn’t until well into the 19th century that bloodletting disappeared. Today leeches have found renewed use in some surgeries, particularly after microsurgery. Doctors sometimes find it helpful, for example, to use leeches to restore blood flow to a re-attached finger or to portions of the skin following plastic surgery. 11. Which word or phrase does the author use to transition from bloodletting to leeches?

A. It wasn’t until well into the 19th century…
B. Eventually the procedure was largely….
C. Afterward, they would collect…
D. Another tool of ancient doctors… 12. What would be a credible source for more information on what it would be like to go to the doctor before 1900?

A. an article on leeches today
B. the history of ancient medicine
C. the history of bloodletting
D. a novel that refers to leeches 13. What was the author’s purpose for this article?

A. to inform the reader that bleeding was as common in ancient days as aspirin is today
B. to entertain the reader with gross medical practices
C. to explain to the reader why bloodletting stopped, yet leeches are still used
D. to persuade the reader that leeches should be used for surgery recovery 14. A student wants to add this sentence to the article.

Scientists such as Louis Pasteur Joseph Lister and Robert Koch showed that germs not humors were responsible for disease.

Which sentence uses commas correctly?

A. Scientists such as Louis Pasteur, Joseph Lister, and Robert Koch showed that germs, not humors, were responsible for disease.
B. Scientists such as Louis Pasteur Joseph Lister and Robert Koch showed that germs, not humors, were responsible for disease.
C. Scientists such, as Louis Pasteur, Joseph Lister and Robert Koch showed that germs not humors were responsible for disease.
D. Scientists, such as Louis Pasteur Joseph Lister and Robert Koch, showed that germs, not humors, were responsible for disease. 15. Which of the following sentences would best conclude this article?

A. Doctors should be cautious when opening a vein in a patient for the purpose of bloodletting.
B. Although the purpose for bloodletting has changed throughout history, it will continue to be used as an important medical tool.
C. The art of bloodletting has not changed much since the use of leeches was first documented in medical texts.
D. Leeches became so popular in the 19th century, French doctors imported them. 16. How did the author organize the information in the first paragraph?

A. compare/contrast
B. cause/effect
C. narrative
D. definition 17. Read the sentence below.

As for today most people regard loathsome leeches as loathsome, but they are again being used for surgery recovery.

Which sentence is improved by removing the repetition?

A. As for today most people today regard loathsome leeches as loathsome, but are again being used for surgery recovery.
B. As for today most people today regard leeches as loathsome, but they are again being used for surgery recovery.
C. As for today most people regard leeches as loathsome, but today they are again being used for surgery recovery today.
D. As for today most people regard leeches as loathsome, but they are again being used for surgery recovery. 18. The author has decided to add a hook to the introduction of the article. Read the following hook.

Did you know that doctors used to think some sicknesses were caused by having too much blood in your body?

What type of hook did the author choose to use?

A. anecdote
B. question
C. quote
D. statement of intrigue 19. Read the following sentence from the article.

They would tie off the area with a tourniquet and strike diagonally or lengthwise into the vein.

Which word below means the same as the underlined word in the sentence?

A. band aid
B. compressing device
C. knife
D. precise cut Directions: Read each question carefully. Select the best answer. 20. Marissa is the only one of her friends who wants to tell the truth about accidentally scratching the neighbor’s car. Now every single one of her friends do not want to have anything to do with her. If you were writing a story about this situation, what type of conflict would be taking place?

A. man vs. man
B. man vs. nature
C. man vs. himself
D. man vs. society 21. What is another name for the turning point in the story?

A. resolution
B. falling action
C. climax
D. exposition 22. What is the type of writing meant to explain a topic called?

A. narrative
B. persuasive
C. analytical
D. expository 23. Which of the following can add descriptive details to a piece of writing?

A. transitions
B. sensory words
C. thesis statement
D. theme 24. Which of the following genres of writing is considered nonfiction?

A. folk tale
B. myth
C. personal narrative
D. short story
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