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Procrastination, demotivation and you

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by

Mark Witton

on 4 December 2014

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Transcript of Procrastination, demotivation and you

Procrastination,
demotivation
and you

More than 10% of students with engagement concerns report symptoms of demotivation
This doesn't mean they're
LOUSY STUDENTS...
lazy
party animals
unintelligent
boring
workshy
uncreative
...because we ALL get demotivated from time-to-time
what's more, we all
PROCRASTINATE


pro|cras¦tin|ate. VERB. Delay or postpone action; put off doing something
We do this
naturally
as a response against tiredness and stress, and shouldn't feel ashamed about it
SLACKERS
IMMATURE
irresponsible
unambitious
DEMOTIVATION HAZARD
i.e. WHEN OUR WORK IS
ADVERSELY AFFECTED
BECAUSE WE'RE ACTIVELY IGNORING IT
How do you know if you're
suffering motivation issues?
Do any of the following statements sound familiar?
You put off work for as long as possible, waiting for 'the right moment' to start
Normally uninteresting tasks - like domestic chores, grocery shopping - take precedent over work
You leave all your work until the last moment, and feel dissatisfied with the half-finished product you submit
Your 'work time' is actually staring at a blank sheet of paper or a pile of books for
hours without producing anything.
You request deadline extensions and attempt to justify handing work in late. Your excuses begin with “I would have done this but…”
Your free time is plagued with the nagging sense that you should be doing something more important.
You feel you are letting yourself down and consider yourself a lazy, underachieving student. You envy students who seem to crack on with their work without trouble.
If any of these apply to
then you may have issues with motivation and procrastination
DEMOTIVATION HAZARD
BUT WE NEED TO KNOW WHEN DEMOTIVATION AND PROCRASTINATION ARE
BECOMING PROBLEMS
Being demotivated does not necessarily equate to being lazy or suffering complicated personal issues

Everyday University life can create issues with motivation and procrastination.


The causes of demotivation
Academically challenging and intensive work, a new setting, new people, and - often for the first time - there's no-one to hold our hands

Faced with such challenges, it's easy to put off tasks requiring effort in favour of activities which are less demanding
Particularly in later degree stages, workloads can be
huge
,
overwhelming and
Not only do you have multiple assignments, but each is comprised of multiple components...
Against such odds, it can seem easier to ignore workloads than face up to them...
socialising
nightlife
movies
games
social media
sports
University is often the first time we are not explicitly instructed about
where, when or how to work.
This can not only give a false sense of our amount of free time, but also makes us very vulnerable to distractions.
...and this helps bury secret, underlying fears of failure
Effective studying is actually a skill. Like all skills, they come naturally to some of us...

Low self-esteem can affect our ability to work effectively. We justify low-expectations and failure to ourselves, feel ashamed about asking for help, and let our work pile up because we do not feel confident enough to take it on.
It can seem that, despite all our hard work, we never get the grades we want.

Disappointment after disappointment can ultimately see us giving up because 'there's no point in trying any more'.
When we are forced into situations we don't enjoy, a common response can be quiet rebellion through inactivity.
University sometimes does not meet our expectations. Course content and teaching styles can prove unsatisfactory to us.

Maybe attending university
wasn't even our own choice.
Mark Witton
Student Support Adviser
mark.witton@port.ac.uk


...constant unhealthy living can lead to
inability to wake up for lectures
constant tiredness
grogginess
susceptibility to illnesses
lack of focus

These have obvious impacts on our desire and ability to tackle challenging workloads.
While the odd bit of indulgence does us good, and is expected during a student's university career...
Many students are unmotivated because they lead
consistently unhealthy lives
Do any of the following scenarios chime with your own motivational issues?
Identifying WHY you are demotivated is the first step to remedying the problem.
University is difficult
TERRIFYING
...and you're expected to produce work at the highest quality, professional level
...but it's not all scary
nice days
chums
gophers
internet
Are your study skills....
...a bit rusty?
...more than others

However gifted we are at studying, we all need practice at concentrating and focusing on our work.
Letting our study skills slip can lead to being easily bored, distracted, or overwhlemed by work
Problems with self-confidence
And that's when we get mad
Maybe you don't even want to be doing this anymore
Poor diets
Over indulgence in drink and drugs
Erratic sleeping patterns
Poor attention to medical conditions


Do any of these seem familiar?
If so, don't despair.

There are plenty of strategies you can employ to help get your motivation back and beat procrastination
And the University wants to help
Student wellbeing services
http://www.port.ac.uk/students/counselling-and-wellbeing-service/
Academic Skills Unit
http://www.port.ac.uk/students/academic-skills-unit/
Chaplaincy
http://www.port.ac.uk/students/chaplaincy/
Contact the CCI Student Support Adviser...
(ccistudentsupport@port.ac.uk)

...and consider contacting other student-support services
Full transcript