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The Globe Theatre

History of the Globe Theatre
by

Nathaniel Lamb

on 5 December 2012

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Transcript of The Globe Theatre

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Images from Shutterstock.com The End! We hope you enjoyed our presentation on the Globe Theatre. So without further ado, Au Revoir! This is a informative tour of the Globe Theatre, Queen Elizabeth's favorite theater to visit and the venue of many of Shakepeare's most famous plays Shakespeares Globe Theatre This tour involves a PowerPoint Presentation and a 5 minute virtual tour of the Globe itself. Hope you enjoy! The Globe after being rebuilt in 1997 by Queen Elizabeth, draws even bigger crowds than it did in the 1600s. Actors still perform Shakespeare’s most popular plays, such as Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Henry V. The Globe Today! The only time that the Theatre crowds were suppressed was during outbreaks of the Bubonic Plague, or Black Death. Although not as horrid as during the Medieval ages, people were still dropping like flies. In 1563, in London alone, over 20,000 people were killed by the plague. Black Death Theater became very popular in the early 1600s. The Globe, which was one of the biggest theatres in London, experienced blowout crowds almost every night. Playacting by some religions, especially Puritans, looked down on theater. Despite this, theater in London became as popular as Gladiator fighting in the old Roman Empire. Let’s go to the Theatre! After a decade of success, tragedy struck the Globe. In 1613, the Globe Theatre burnt to the ground. It was thought to have been caused by a cannon shot during a performance. The Fire The Globe was built in 1599 and was a first of its kind. It featured trap doors and, pulleys, and levers. Making it state of the art. The Globe The Globe Theatre Shakespeare’s Legacy
By:
Isaac Thomas and Nathaniel Lamb Puritan’s , which were the majority of the English population at the time, looked down on playacting. Theater was constantly battered against. Several laws and acts were passed against playacting. But for the majority, they were unable to stem the popularity of theater. But in 1642, the Puritan Parliament issued an ordinance suppressing all stage plays and in 1644, the Globe Theatre was demolished. Puritan’s Unite! The Globe Theatre’s performances featured many special effects. They were the first of it’s kind and added a lot to the plays. For example, the trap door on the right. Also included were pulleys (used for aerial performances), levers, and cannon shots. Special Effects! The Globe Theatre Shakespeare's Legacy
By:
Isaac Thomas and Nathaniel Lamb
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