Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The cranial cruciate ligament rupture

No description
by

Mohamed Emad

on 10 April 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The cranial cruciate ligament rupture



Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture


Overview
The cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) is one of the most important stabilizers inside the canine stifle joint .
In humans the CrCL is called the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

Anatomical structure
FUNCTIONS
ETIOLOGY
1.Sudden rotation of the stifle .
2.Hyperextension, hyperflexion .
3.Stifle dislocation .
4.Degenerative changes;
senility, obesity, abnormal bone conformation.

clinical signs
1.difficulty rising from a sit.
2.non-weight bearing lameness.
3.joint swelling "effusion".
4.unwillingness to play.
5.atrophy of thigh muscles
"chronic cases"
Diagnosis
treatment
Lateral capsular and fascial imbrication
intra-articular techniques
presented by
REFERENCES
http://www.nashvillevetspecialists.com/specialties/surgery/common-medical-conditions/canine-cranial-cruciate-ligament-rupture/
https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/cranial-cruciate-ligament-disease
http://hairevet.com/services/orthopedic-neurologic-surgery/knees/#lightbox[gallery-1]/3/
http://yourownvet.com/cruciate-ligament-injuries-in-dogs/
Non-surgical treatment:
-Activity restriction
-anti-inflammatories
-Rehabilitation therapy
-Custom knee
bracing/orthotics
VIDEO
VIDEO
VIDEO
VIDEO
VIDEO
VIDEO
Full transcript