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Seamus Heaney- Connected Learning 2013

Year 9 Connected Learning
by

nicky bonnes

on 8 January 2015

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Transcript of Seamus Heaney- Connected Learning 2013

At Toomebridge




Where the flat water
Came pouring over the weir out of Lough Neagh
As if it had reached an edge of the flat earth
And fallen shining to the continuous
Present of the Bann.
Where the checkpoint used to be.
Where the rebel boy was hanged in '98.
Where negative ions in the open air
Are poetry to me. As once before
The slime and silver of the fattened eel.
Seamus Heaney
slime and silver
fattened eel
flat water
Description:

‘Lough Neagh Eel’ is the name given to both yellow (known as brown locally) and silver (mature) wild eels of the species Anguilla anguilla (European eel) caught in the defined area. This application covers fresh eels only. Lough Neagh eels have the following characteristics:

— large in size (minimum 40 cm in length, weight between 150-600 g)

— higher fat content than eels from other locations (mature Lough Neagh eels have approximately 23 % fat)

— the younger ‘brown/yellow eels’ are a dark green with a brown/yellow tint

— the older ‘silver eels’ are black with a silver tint

— Lough Neagh eels have a narrow head and short tail with rounded body

— the flesh of the fresh eel once cooked is white, soft and fluffy with an earthy flavour
Europe
Lough Neagh
Aerial view of
Toomebridge
Poetry
Lough Neagh and The Eel Industry
Cooking demonstration
Migration cycle
Year 9 Connected Learning
Home Economics
Geography
English
Science
Art
Music
Local Songwriter- Malachy Duffin
Local Scientist- Dr. Derek Evans
Local Cooking experts-
Pauline Mc Keever & Belinda Kelly
They then become young eels - at this stage they are known as 'glass eels' because they are transparent.
Life span They can live for around 16-30 years.
Statistics Males are about 40cm long, and females range between 80-100cm long.
Habitat They can survive in almost any type of water, including salt, fresh, still or flowing. They are also able to travel over land. They live on the bottom of the water, under stones and in mud and crevices.
Pollan lay their eggs in gravel. The female builds the nest, usually between November and January when the water is cold and carrying lots of oxygen, because that is what the eggs need to hatch.
She will then release some of her eggs. The male (cock) fish will release his sperm or milt over the eggs to fertilise them. The hen then moves forward and digs again to throw up gravel to cover the fertilised eggs.
Pollan spawn in December and January in shallow rocky areas of the loughs where wave action provides good oxygenation for the developing eggs. The young fish feed on animal plankton and on larger invertebrates as they grow older.

Spawning takes place from about three years of age and individuals can generally live for about five years, although a seven-year-old has been recorded from Lower Lough Erne.
The image of the pollan
Pollan is a silvery trout-shaped fish, with a dark greeny-blue back. Superficially, it resembles a herring but is easily recognized due to the presence of the diagnostic salmonid adipose fin, a small fleshy dorsal fin just in front of the tail.
7000 km - distance between the Sargasso Sea breeding sites and the UK!!!
90% - decline of European Eel stock since the 1970s. Not Good!!
The young glass Eels are so transparent that you can read a newspaper through them!!
Key Eel Facts!!
The glass eels will move up the River Bann and into Lough Neagh where they become darker in colour and are now called elvers.
The eels, with males and females, spend 6 to 12 and 9 to 20 years in freshwater respectively.
Towards the end of this time, they become sexually mature; they turn a silvery colour and migrate back towards the Sargasso Sea on dark, moonless and stormy nights; during this time they are known as 'silver eels' .
The European eel has a fascinating life-cycle. It breeds in the sea, swims to Lough Neagh in order to grow before returning to the sea to spawn.
It is thought that all European eels spawn in the Sargasso Sea.
The larvae which look like curled leaves drift in the ocean for up to three years and are carried by the Gulf Stream towards the coasts of Europe
The Sargasso Sea is 1,100 km wide and 3,200 km long. The ocean water in the Sargasso Sea is distinctive for its deep blue color and exceptional clarity, with underwater visibility of up to 200 feet (61 m).
The Sargasso Sea is a region in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean.
Africa
Ireland
The Sargasso Sea
The journey of the eel
some facts on Peatland Study
Geography
Music
Art
Home Economics
At Toomebridge




Where the flat water
Came pouring over the weir out of Lough Neagh
As if it had reached an edge of the flat earth
And fallen shining to the continuous
Present of the Bann.
Where the checkpoint used to be.
Where the rebel boy was hanged in '98.
Where negative ions in the open air
Are poetry to me. As once before
The slime and silver of the fattened eel.
Seamus Heaney
Connected Learning:Seamus Heaney


Composed By Malachy Duffin
Published By Aonar Music

There's a sweet little spot in my memory
that lies upstream on the silvery Bann.
Some say 'twas Fionn Mac Cumhaill that created it
and then formed the Isle of Mann.
They call it the lake of the fairy stead,
and I've fished it for many's a day.
and 'tis there that the wild duck in thousands feed
on the lovely green banks of Lough Neagh.

'tis many's the day I spent ramblin'
the five counties that make up her shores -
the land of the oak and ó Cathain,
the orchard county so steeped in our lore.
the home of O'Neill fierce in battle,
and McDonnell the king of the glens,
and the resting place of Patrick
on the lovely green banks of Lough Neagh.

'tis well I remember that little crew
that fished for the eel from Ardboe.
there was Tommy and Jim, Mick and Little Hugh,
poor Billy's now dead, rest his soul.
and I still hear the voices in the sun
of men and women out making the hay,
and the laughter of children out havin' fun
on the lovely green banks of Lough Neagh.

last year death robbed me of Mary,
now I live in Chicago alone,
but the voice of those waters keeps callin' me
to return to my own native shores.
oh, I'd give all the pearls in the ocean
for a boat and a warm summer's day,
just to row out and watch the sun settin'
on the lovely green banks of Lough Neagh.
Local poet
Local Songwriter
At Toomebridge




Where the flat water
Came pouring over the weir out of Lough Neagh
As if it had reached an edge of the flat earth
And fallen shining to the continuous
Present of the Bann.
Where the checkpoint used to be.
Where the rebel boy was hanged in '98.
Where negative ions in the open air
Are poetry to me. As once before
The slime and silver of the fattened eel.
Seamus Heaney
At Toomebridge




Where the flat water
Came pouring over the weir out of Lough Neagh
As if it had reached an edge of the flat earth
And fallen shining to the continuous
Present of the Bann.
Where the checkpoint used to be.
Where the rebel boy was hanged in '98.
Where negative ions in the open air
Are poetry to me. As once before
The slime and silver of the fattened eel.
Seamus Heaney
Lough Neagh has proved to be a source of inspiration for famous writers such as Seamus Heaney who mentions the importance of the eel and his home area in the poem
'At Toomebridge.'
We hope your enjoy our digital presentation of the poem.
Our School-
St. Benedict's College
Heaney Country
Connected Learning 2012: the theme was Lough Neagh and the Eel Industry and poetry was an important area of study.
Connected Learning 2013: Year 9 pupils completed units of work connected by the poetry of Seamus Heaney in tribute of the life and work of one of the most celebrated Irishmen of our time.
We hope you enjoy the presentations which celebrate our connection with Seamus Heaney.

Childhood

Family
Full transcript