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Bloom's Taxonomy

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by

Randy Borum

on 6 October 2013

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Transcript of Bloom's Taxonomy

In 1956, educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom and his colleagues described a hierarchy of learning objectives. These might be thought of as "levels" of learning.
The original "taxonomy" of levels looked like this:
In the 1990s, Lorin Anderson, one of Bloom's former students, led an effort to update Bloom's Taxonomy.
The "new" version of the taxonomy
looked like this:

You can remember the stages with this mnemonic device:
R
eal
U
nicorns
A
re
A
lways
E
xcellent
C
atches
R
emembering
U
nderstanding
A
nalyzing
A
pplying
C
reating

Recall previous learned information.

Examples:

Recite a policy. Quote prices from memory to a customer. Knows the safety rules.

Key Words:

defines, describes, identifies, knows, labels, lists, matches, names, outlines, recalls, recognizes, reproduces, selects, states.


Comprehending the meaning, translation, interpolation, and interpretation of instructions and problems. State a problem in one's own words.

Examples:

Rewrites the principles of test writing. Explain in one's own words the steps for performing a complex task. Translates an equation into a computer spreadsheet.

Key Words:

comprehends, converts, defends, distinguishes, estimates, explains, extends, generalizes, gives an example, infers, interprets, paraphrases, predicts, rewrites, summarizes, translates.

Use a concept in a new situation or unprompted use of an abstraction. Applies what was learned in the classroom into novel situations in the work place
.

Examples:

Use a manual to calculate an employee's vacation time. Apply laws of statistics to evaluate the reliability of a written test.

Key Words:

applies, changes, computes, constructs, demonstrates, discovers, manipulates, modifies, operates, predicts, prepares, produces, relates, shows, solves, uses
.
Separates material or concepts into component parts so that its organizational structure may be understood. Distinguishes between facts and inferences.

Examples:

Troubleshoot a piece of equipment by using logical deduction. Recognize logical fallacies in reasoning. Gathers information from a department and selects the required tasks for training.

Key Words:

analyzes, breaks down, compares, contrasts, diagrams, deconstructs, differentiates, discriminates, distinguishes, identifies, illustrates, infers, outlines, relates, selects, separates
.
Evaluating:

Make judgments about the value of ideas or materials.

Examples:
Select the most effective solution. Hire the most qualified candidate. Explain and justify a new budget.

Key Words:
appraises, compares, concludes, contrasts, criticizes, critiques, defends, describes, discriminates, evaluates, explains, interprets, justifies, relates, summarizes, supports.

Builds a structure or pattern from diverse elements. Put parts together to form a whole, with emphasis on creating a new meaning or structure.

Examples:

Write a company operations or process manual. Design a machine to perform a specific task. Integrates training from several sources to solve a problem. Revises and process to improve the outcome.

Key Words:

categorizes, combines, compiles, composes, creates, devises, designs, explains, generates, modifies, organizes, plans, rearranges, reconstructs, relates, reorganizes, revises, rewrites, summarizes, tells, writes.
The following descriptions come from Jim Cormier, University of New Mexico
Remembering
Understanding
Applying:
Analyzing:
Creating
E
valuating
Full transcript