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Cer. I Recycling Clay

Where does clay come from and how do we recycle it?
by

Darla Coppa

on 23 January 2017

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Transcript of Cer. I Recycling Clay

and how do we
recycle it?

Where does clay
come from?

What is Clay?
In Conclusion
Clay is naturally occurring aluminum silicate composed primarily of fine-grained minerals and exhibits plasticity (the ability of the clay to take &
hold the form that the potter gives it) when mixed
with water in certain proportions. When dry, it
becomes firm and when fired in a kiln,
permanent physical and chemical
changes occur, which convert it
into a ceramic material.
Approximately 80% of the earth's land surface contains clay. There is a good chance that there are local earthenware clays near where you live.
Some of the best places to look for clay include:

- river banks
- stream beds
- road cuts
- naturally exposed earth
such as in canyons or
gullies, and
- construction sites
Where can you find clay?
Nowhere in the state did clay mining reach the scale it did in
Hancock County
in 1830.

Hancock County clay is of
sedimentary origin
, which means it is usually associated with coal and shale.

Dozens of companies at that time were manufacturing
bricks, sewer pipe, pottery, and specialty items such as chimney tops, terra cotta vases, and furnace linings from local clay and shale.



Clay Mining
in 1830 extracting clay from strip mines and underground mines was done by hand, loading buckets full of clay and carrying it out of the mines.

Modernization in 1895 to 1915 allowed clay to be hauled from the mines by locomotives to giant crushers and moved on conveyors to local manufacturing plants or to barges on the Ohio River or, later, to the railroad for transporting to other parts of the country where it was in great demand.
*
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How and where can you collect your own clay?
Recycling
Why is it important to
recycle our
classroom clay?
How to use the Pug Mill
As you work, you are likely to have a number of scrap pieces of clay accumulate.
In hand building, if the scraps haven’t dried out too much you can re-work them without having to do much more than compress them back together and work the air out. If you are throwing, however, your scraps are likely to be quite wet and will be plaed on the wedging table to suck out the water for reuse later in the day.











As long as your clay has
NOT BEEN FIRED
or had
contaminants introduced
to it you
can reuse your clay scraps and clay slurry to make more clay.

Recyling is an EASY but LONG and messy process

Here at
GOHS
we recycle all of our unfired clay to use again for future projects.
WHY?
It saves you money in class fees
and i
t saves our sinks.

If we rinsed all of our daily clay down the sinks they would very quickly clog and we could no longer have a clay studio.
We need everyone's help to be
responsible for recycling the clay for reuse.
Don’t throw these
scraps away;
you can recycle
them back into
usable clay again.
What are the stages
of clay from
wettest to the driest?
Slip -
CLAY DILUTED WITH WATER TO THE CONSISTENCY OF CREAM, USED FOR JOINING PIECES OF CLAY.
Plastic -
THE QUALITY OF CLAY WHICH ALLOWS IT TO BE MANIPULATED, SHAPED, and MOLDED WITHOUT CRACKING OR CRUMBLING; WORKABILTY.
Leather Hard -
VISABLY DAMP BUT STIFF ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO BE HANDLED WITHOUT DEFORMATION. CARVING AND ADDING HANDLES OR OTHER ADDITIONS CAN BE APPLIED AT THIS POINT.
Bone Dry (Greenware) -
UNFIRED CLAY THAT IS FREE OF WATER, ONLY CONTAINS THE AMOUNT OF MOISTURE IN ATMOSPHERE.
Bisque Firing -
FIRST FIRING AT LOWER TEMPERATURE TO MAKE POTS LESS FRAGILE. Usually Cone 010 to 05.
Glaze Firing -
TYPICALLY THE SECOND FIRING OF A PIECE OF POTTERY WHICH HAS BEEN COATED WITH GLASS FORMING MATERIALS.
Cone 06 to Cone 6
A thriving pottery industry began manufacturing dishes and tableware.

When used for bricks, the clay was pushed through rollers several times to grind it to sufficient fineness, mixed with water in the ‘‘wet pan’’ and poured into brick molds to dry in the sun before being fired by wood in beehive kilns.
Clay was originally mined by hand.
Quiz over info next class
ROAD CUT - Clay mixed with dirt and stones,
twigs, grass, sand, etc....
PURE CLAY - all additives have been
removed.
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