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Avalanches: A New Look

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by

Kevin Masters

on 1 February 2013

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Transcript of Avalanches: A New Look

A NEW LOOK AVALANCHES An avalanche (also called a snowslide or snowslip) is a sudden, drastic flow of snow down a slope, occurring when either natural triggers, such as loading from new snow or rain, or artificial triggers, such as snowmobilers, explosives or backcountry skiers, overload the snowpack. WHAT IS AN AVALANCHE? Simple Explanation So... Can a Person Really Cause an Avalanche? http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/other-shows/videos/raging-planet-three-types-of-avalanches.htm 3 TYPES OF AVALANCHES ARE SNOW AVALANCHES THE ONLY TYPE? The earthquake struck on a Sunday afternoon at 15:23:31 local time (20:23:31 UTC) and lasted 45 seconds. The quake destabilized the northern wall of Mount Huascarán, causing a rock, ice and snow avalanche and burying the towns of Yungay and Ranrahirca. The avalanche started as a sliding mass of glacial ice and rock about 3,000 feet (910 m) wide and one mile (1.6 km) long. It advanced about 11 miles (18 km) to the village of Yungay at an average speed of 280 to 335 km per hour.[2] The fast-moving mass picked up glacial deposits and by the time it reached Yungay, it is estimated to have consisted of about 80 million cubic meters (80,000,000 m³) of water, mud, and rocks. There was over 100,000 casualties.
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