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Making Inferences

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by

Fatumata Magiraga

on 21 July 2016

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Transcript of Making Inferences

MAKING INFERENCES
Being a Reading Detective means to "Read Between the Lines!"
When you read between the lines you try to understand what someone implies, but doesn't openly state, when they say or write something.

Example: I got a letter from Robyn and she isn't happy. She didn't say anything, but I could tell by reading between the lines that something's wrong.

The point is a good writer doesn't tell the reader everything directly, but leaves it up to the reader to figure things out for themselves by reading between the lines.
How do we make an inference?
Easy! Use the Inference Equation


Use the information that is explicitly stated in the text
+

What you already know

=

making general conclusions

Inference Equation
She is a teacher. Judging from how she looks and using your background knowledge, what do you think she's doing?
Conclusion
Making Inferences
Big Idea: We will improve our reading comprehension by drawing conclusions and making inferences.

Objectives:
- We will be able to make inferences based on implicit information and using your schema.

- We will also be able to draw conclusions based on your prior knowledge and the provided texts.
What Do You Infer?
What Do You Infer?
Let's Practice!!
What do we need to know about making inferences?
Good readers infer from the text
during and after
reading. Making an inference means to
hypothesize
, to make conclusions based on information from the text. Inferring means going beyond the words of the text to make a judgment about
what is not there, but is implied
. Readers
make inferences about how characters feel
even though the author may not have explicitly written about the characters’ feelings. They
make judgments about the true or deeper meaning of the text
-what it symbolized or what the underlying message might be. Skillful readers often reflect on what the author is really trying to say.
Let's Practice More!
Give me examples of times in the past when where you had to make an inference.
So... What does this mean? ...
• Bill was reading about the sun, the moon, and Mars. It was a book about . . .
• At recess the students got their gloves, bats and balls. What were they likely to do?
• During a very severe storm, the electricity went off. Dad lit a match. What did he probably want to find?
• Maria, a high school student, had a day off school. She looked in the newspaper to find the best sales. Then she left the house. Where did she probably go?
• Jesse and his father went walking on a warm spring day. As they were walking strings were dragging behind them. There was a nice breeze in the air. What might Jesse and his father go to do?
Big Idea: We will improve our reading comprehension by drawing conclusions and making inferences.

Objectives:
- We will be able to make inferences based on implicit information and using our schema.

- We will also be able to draw conclusions based on our prior knowledge and the provided texts.
Tell me! What does it mean to make an inference in your own words?
Full transcript