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Psychology of Process: the Art of Yayoi Kusama

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A.M. Kelleher

on 15 November 2012

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Transcript of Psychology of Process: the Art of Yayoi Kusama

Visions of Art/Life
Yayoi Kusama Modernist Reception for Art created by artists suffering from Mental Illness
"Primitive" Impulsive Unconsciously executed reveals a "true essence" of a "universal art" Contextualized along with art created by young children and "primitive" Critical Reception: 1958-1968 Infinity net paintings are massive success Kusama is a highly important, influential and successful living Artist Kusama's Own Self-Mythologization, Other Contextual Hurdles for Kusama's Reception: 1958-'68 A Female Artist in a drastically Male-Dominated heriarchical art world A Japanese immigrant arriving in America very shortly after WWII's conclusion, facing culture shock in addition to receptions colored by Racism and stereotyping of her identity. The Big Picture Goal: To acknowledge Yayoi Kusama's success as a highly influential artist, appreciated in what is critically acknowledged as the height of her art-producing career in New York from 1955-the late 1960s, as well as today to perhaps an even greater degree. Today, time elapsed since her first practices have allowed for more critical attempts to re-align her works as overcoming the many odds stacked against her on her arrival to New York City due to her being female, Japanese, suffering from mental illness, and an artist during this difficult period. Of these factors, I investigate the latter as it has influenced trajectories in her reception as an artist. "She's probably the only hero we can have right now" Why I thought this was interesting Kusama's Hallucinatory experiences before the age of ten and diagnosed Depersonalization Syndrome, and everyday anxieties continue to be an integral part of her motivations and processes for art-making. 草間 彌生 Mentally ill or Media Manipulator? Eisenstat, Ellen K. “The Obliteration of the Self: The Art and Psychology of Yayoi Kusama”. Thesis, Pratt Institute. 1999.

Foster, Hal. “Blinded Insights: On the Modernist Reception of the Art of the Mentally Ill.” October Magazine, Michigan
Institute of Technology Press 97. October (Summer 2001): 30.

Kusama, Yayoi, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968. Los Angeles: Los
Angeles County Museum of Art, 1998.

Kusama, Yayoi. Infinity Net: The Autobiography of Yayoi Kusama. Translated by Ralph McCarthy. Trade paperback.
University of Chicago Press, 2012.

Morris, Frances, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Centre Georges Pompidou, Tate Modern (Gallery), and
Whitney Museum of American Art. Yayoi Kusama. New York: D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, 2012.

Pollock, Griselda, ed. Psychoanalysis and the Image: Transdisciplinary Perspectives. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

Wallace, Isabelle Loring, and Jennie Hirsh. Contemporary Art and Classical Myth. Edited by Isabelle Loring Wallace and
Jennie Hirsh. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2011. Bibliography “Notwithstanding her fame, it is still a difficult task to interpret her art without being trapped in the pervasive dynamics of the Modernist paradigm with its power structure still so charged with sexual, racial, and cultural politics”
-Izumi Nakajima (128) Pollock, Griselda. Psychoanalysis and the Image: Transdisciplinary Perspectives. John Wiley & Sons, 2008. -Lynn Zelevansky, in Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama
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