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BODY PEACE

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Megan Hurtig

on 24 September 2015

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Transcript of BODY PEACE

Studies have also shown that the thin-ideal images portrayed in media can trigger eating disorder symptoms. (Bair, 2012)
Quotation 1
A DEMAND FOR CHANGE
MEGAN HURTIG
WHAT IS THE ISSUE?
Headline 5
WHAT'S UNDERNEATH
"In media today, there exist images of the thin female body that serve to create a cultural standard for what is ideal." (Hefner, 2014, p.145)
Disordered Eating Behaviors Related to Exposure to Media
Disordered eating
Greater discrepancies between actual body size and women's ideal body size
Greater discrepancies between actual body size and perceptions of how others want them to look
Stricter food choices when around others
THE UGLY TRUTH: A CALL FOR ACTION
The mortality rate of eating disorders is 6 percent, probably the most deadly of all mental disorders in patients, incorporating starvation, cardiac arrest, and suicide
Women with anorexia are 50 times more likely to commit suicide than women in the general population
From 5 to 20 percent of idividuals with anorexia die prematurely
As many as one in ten college women suffer from a clinical or nearly clinical eating disorder
An introduction to:
THE WHAT'S UNDERNEATH PROJECT
(Teen Health and The Media, 2009)
(Bair, 2012)
Mother and daughter team, Elisa and Lily, are the founders of the “I Am What’s Underneath” project. In 2009, they picked up a home video camera using inclusion to spread their message of self-acceptance. They interviewed people of all ages, body types, races and genders, who were being subjected to the “cookie-cutter beauty norms” perpetuated throughout media.
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