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William Wordsworth the Father of the Romantic Period

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Miranda D'Silva

on 13 September 2012

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Transcript of William Wordsworth the Father of the Romantic Period

NATIONALISM By Miranda D'Silva William Wordsworth the Father of the Romantic Period The Romantic Period (Beginning in the last decades of the eighteenth century and continuing at least through the middle of the nineteenth) The Romantic period was an artistic, literary and intellectual movement that began in Europe in the last decades of the eighteenth century and continued at least through the middle of the nineteenth century. It strengthened in reaction to the Industrial Revolution. The Romantic period was a revolt against social and political aspects of society. It was represented most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature. In the Romantic period, popular issues in society were the themes that composers wrote about in their lyrics. Popular Issues In Society These issues consisted of nationalism, the escape from political oppression, the fates of national or religious groups, and the events which were taking place in far off settings or exotic climates. Popular issuers that were also taking place in the Romantic period were the change of... Music, Art and Literature. Important Changes That Were Taking Place The Romantic era was a period of great change and emancipation.The changes that were taking place included music, art and the Industrial Revolution. The Classical era had strict laws of balance and restraint, however, the Romantic period allowed artistic freedom, experimentation, and creativity. Change of Music The music of the Romantic period was very expressive and composers started to display nationalism. New musical techniques were introduced, this caused composers to begin to experiment with length of compositions, new harmonies, and tonal relationships. New instruments were constantly being added to the orchestra and composers also tried to get new or different sounds out of the instruments already in use. The new forms of music included symphonic poem, which was an orchestral work that portrayed a story or had some kind of literary or artistic background to it. Art song, which was a vocal musical work with tremendous emphasis placed on the text or the symbolical meanings of words within the text. Opera also became increasingly popular, as it continued to musically tell a story and to express the issues of the day. Change of Art During the eighteenth century, the rococo style was one of the most common and dominant styles of artwork, however, the Romantic period bought change in the style of art. The Romantic Period showed the change from the polished, elegant rococo styles to the strong, bright, detailed, and passionate artworks created by Romantic artists which added feeling to the artwork. Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution was the changes in agriculture, manufacturing, mining, transportation, and technology that had a great effect on the social, economic and cultural conditions of the times. The Industrial Revolution was considered by many to be a significant influence on the artists and writers of the Romantic Movement. Political and cultural Situations That Occurred POLITICAL OPPRESSION Nationalism was a significant cultural situation. Nationalism was a reaction against the influences of German literature. The writers of the Romantic period aimed to write works which were expressive and had characteristic of their own nationality. They did this by using scenes from their country’s life, history, folk-tales and legends as a basis for operas, songs, literature, and symphonic poems. In the Romantic period the escape from political oppression was a significant political situation. Political oppression is the persecution of an individual or group for political reasons. The escape of political oppression was a popular theme that composers wrote about. Significant People in the Romantic Period Francisco de Goya William Wordsworth Ludwig Van Beethoven One of the most original artists of his age, he produced glittering portraits of his royal patrons and some of the darkest and most intense images in art. Both of Goya’s technique and approach were bold and uncompromising. Generally acknowledged as the father of Romantic poetry, he spent his life quietly in English Lake District, writhing passionate poetry inspired by the beautiful and lonely countryside. Although he was totally deaf for the last ten years of his life, produced some of the finest music the world has ever heard. Today, his work is performed more than that of any other composer. Mood of society The mood of society was affected in a dramatic way in the Romantic period as the changes of music, art and literature came about. The mood of the Romantic period was very expressive, passionate and meaningful. It was also the free expression of human feelings. Change in music Change in art Change in literature The Classical era had strict laws of balance and restraint, however, the Romantic period allowed artistic freedom, experimentation, creativity and started to display nationalism. The style of art went from being polished and elegant, to strong, bright, detailed, and passionate. Writers began to write about nationalism which was a reaction against German literature. The writers also began to use expression and wrote more passionately. (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) William Wordsworth William Wordsworth is generally acknowledged as the father of Romantic poetry, he spent his life quietly in English Lake District, writing passionate poetry inspired by the beautiful and lonely countryside. People, Events and Things Which Made an Impacted The countryside where he grew up Classic poetry inspired Wordsworth's formal artificial style of poetry which seemed old-fashioned to many. Annette Vallon Classic poetry Collaborations Countryside of Lake district Wordsworth did not enjoy school and preferred to wander alone in the isolated and windswept hills of the local countryside which then lead him to neglect his studies. Wordsworth fell in love with a girl named Annette Vallon, but war broke out between Britain and France, ending the relationship. Annette Vallon had a great impact on Wordsworth because this romantic trauma may have prompted Wordsworth to begin writing and before long he had published his first poems. Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy, moved to Somerset, Southwest England, they became neighbours with a poet, Samuel Taylor Coleridge. They then all joined forces to create poems. Coleridge described himself, William and Dorothy as “three people, but only one soul.” Wordsworth’s main source of inspiration came from the countryside of his beloved Lake district. In his poems, he not only described the natural scenes he saw, but also spoke of a close, spiritual link between humans and nature. Preferred Subject Matter William Wordsworth’s preferred subject matter was nature and he was inspired by the beautiful and lonely countryside. He spent his life quietly in English Lake District, writing passionate poetry about his surroundings. In his poems, he not only described the natural scenes he saw, but also spoke of a close, spiritual link between humans and nature. Attitude Towards Nature William Wordsworth’s attitude towards the subject matter of nature was extremely positive. William Wordsworth loved nature and every aspect of it. All of William Wordsworth’s poems were inspired by the beautiful and lonely countryside. He loved and enjoyed writing about nature and the Countryside in which he lived and grew up. Wordsworth spent his life quietly in English Lake District, writing passionate poetry about his surroundings. In his poems, he not only described the natural scenes he saw, but also spoke of a close, spiritual link between humans and nature. Attitude Challenged Popular Thinking VS. William Wordsworth’s attitude challenged the popular thinking of time because he impacted the Romantic period in a big way. He challenged and rebelled against many other poets because many poets of the time such as Thomas Gray, who believed that poetry should be objective and fair, where as William Wordsworth thought that emotion and self-expression should be shown and expressed through poetry and poetry should be about your own personal feelings and emotions. From this attitude, William Wordsworth cut romantic poetry off from tradition and challenged the popular thinking of the Romantic period. Poetry significant In the Romantic Period William Wordsworth’s poetry was very significant and had a great impact on the Romantic period. He was one of the first generation Romantics and he wanted to make poetry more democratic, which was quite a radical idea at the time. Wordsworth’s poetry was significant because he rebelled against poets such as Thomas Gray, who believed that poetry should be objective. Wordsworth thought that emotion and self-expression was the thing that separated poets from other people and from that he cut Romantic poetry off from tradition.
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