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Desert Ecosystem:

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by

Jamile De Medeiros

on 26 October 2013

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Transcript of Desert Ecosystem:

Desert Ecosystem:
Food Web
By Jamile de Medeiros
Producers
Decomposers
Primary Consumers
Secondary Consumers
Tertiary Consumers
1.
Prickly Pear Cactus
2.
3. Rabbit Brush
4. Desert Lily
5. Yucca
6. Sagebrush
7. Kangaroo rat
10. Desert Rabbit
8. Mule Deer
9. Blister Beetle
11. Gopher Snake
12. Red-Tailed Hawk
13. Fennec Fox
14. Bobcat
15. Coyote
16. Desert Beetle
17. Millipede
Sources:
1→ http://melisalerue.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/desert_sun1.jpg
2→http://ieatgrass.com/storage/prickly_pear_cactus.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1303143823592
3→ http://media.merchantcircle.com/3129755/IMG_2282_full.jpeg
4→ http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/1-desert-lily-kelley-king.jpg
5→http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Yucca_schidigera_17.jpg
6→ http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Vrd9B-P1vOM/TzBuc6N07RI/AAAAAAAAGp8/1gO-hoe1dYU/s1600/Sagebrush+%2528Silver%2529%252C+North+Platte+River%252C+WY.jpg
7→ http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7021/6554996147_e94c0003fb_o.jpg
8→ http://www.venisonhq.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Mule_deer_buck_venison.jpg
9→ http://www.americaninsects.net/b/np3-cysteodemus-wislizeni.jpg
10→http://www.ndow.org/uploadedImages/ndoworg/Content/public_images/Taxonomy_Images/Desert-Cottontail-Rabbit.jpg
11→http://herptonixreptiles.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/gopher_snake1.jpeg
12→ http://www.raptorresearchfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Red-tailed_Hawk.jpg
13→http://www.stlzoo.org/files/cache/55a8d6f4f939a164be8880c462032aaf.jpg
14→ http://www.electricdex.com/201104/images/bobcat1.jpg
15→ http://animalshd.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/desert-coyote.jpg
16→ http://www.colourbox.com/preview/1501140-942531-darkling-beetle-in-the-desert-israel.jpg
17→http://www.nhmu.utah.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/desert_millipede.jpg

Question Time
i. Find and write out (on the back of your food web) two different food chains from your food web. Make sure your chosen food chains have at least 4 steps. Try to make each of the food chains you select as different as possible.
ii. On your two selected food chains, identify the producer, primary consumer, secondary consumer and tertiary consumer.
iii. List two top carnivores in your food web.
iv. Explain what would happen if all the primary consumers became extinct. Avoid exaggeration.
v. Describe what would happen if all the decomposers became extinct. Avoid exaggeration.
vi. Explain what would happen if a non-native species severely depleted the population of producers in your food web.
vii. Explain why food webs with many species are more resilient than those with few species.
14. Bobcat
15. Coyote
6. Sagebrush
10. Desert Rabbit
13. Fennec Fox
15. Coyote
17. Millipede
3. Rabbit Brush
7. Kangaroo rat
11. Gopher Snake
14. Bobcat
16. Desert Beetle
Decomposers:
Producers:
Primary consumers:
Secondary consumers:
Tertiary consumers:
15. Coyote
14. Bobcat
13. Fennec Fox
11. Gopher Snake
10. Desert Rabbit
7. Kangaroo rat
6. Sagebrush
3. Rabbit Brush
17. Millipede
16. Desert Beetle
Primary consumers:
10. Desert Rabbit
7. Kangaroo rat
If all the primary consumers were extinct then the secondary consumers would have to rely more heavily on their other food sources. This would cause the population of those other food sources to decrease rapidly and the lack of that supply would cause the population of the secondary consumers to decrease. (Which in turn would also affect the tertiary consumers)
This would cause the population of the other food sources to increase rapidly and would affect the producers more heavily as the population of alternative food sources would explode due to the decrease of these secondary consumers and so on. There wouldn't be any drastic changes to the food chains due to it's complexity but for sure the population of those animals would change is definite.
The decomposers wouldn't be able to decompose the organic material that would be left by the above animals. The detrivores would take advantage of all the carcases laying around and so their numbers would increase. Still, this would affect the producers as they need constant renewed soil to thrive which would in turn affect the primary consumers, then the secondary and the tertiary. They would not be extinct or forever damaged but once again, this would heavily affect their current populations.
This would heavily affect the whole food web. This would decrease the population of the primary consumers so the secondary consumers would probably adapt to add the non-native species to their menu and after a while, when the non-native species population has decreased, the population of the other primary consumers would somewhat regulate back to their original numbers.
Because their complexity makes them more stable. If any of their food sources were to severely decrease, they would be able to rely on other food sources so the food web wouldn't be at risk. Pandas for example, who just rely on bamboo, if that food source is gone, their population would decrease until they became extinct. Concluding, the more replacements a food web has, the more it can adapt to any changes in their diet.
The End
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