Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

02.01 Revolutionary Ideas

No description

Jessica Relyea

on 29 August 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 02.01 Revolutionary Ideas

Your life, your rights.
Great Britain had long oppressed the colonists with heavy taxes and a restrictive government. Things were going wrong and the colonists were fed up with being taken advantage of. When written, the Declaration of Independence had the purpose of being for colonists to formally be independent from Great Britain. This document was structured by including three main components: the introduction and their beliefs (which explained why they left their ruler), grievances (listing the 29 complaints of King George III), and their formal declaration (declared themselves free states, and would govern themselves).
Jessica Relyea
Aug. 28, 2013
Mrs. Deas
Popular Sovereignty
Social Contract
Natural Rights
American Values
Overall, popular sovereignty means that the people choose how their government will work, allowing them to come together and make the best and fairest choices for their country. The Declaration of Independence was their way of saying that Great Britain's government was no longer in control of the colonies. Therefore, they were separating themselves from his rule, and establishing their power by doing so.
Social contract is an agreement among individuals by which society becomes organized and invested with the right to secure mutual protection and welfare from the government. That being said, the Declaration of Independence restates the purpose of the government by the terms of the social contract, that the selected leaders are to ensure that their rights, "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" are being protected, and will not be taken away from them. If the feel as if they are not getting their protection, they are able to alter or abolish it. These were things stated that King George III violated.
These rights are what all individuals born in the United States, or naturalized have. They include life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; sharing the values of equality, freedom and justice. These are rights are unalienable, and are explained in the social contract that the government should protect these rights. Again, King George the III violated these rights, and did not give the necessary protection, yet overstepped his authority.
"Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed..."
"That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends it is the Right of the People to alter or abolish it, and to institute new Government. "
"We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."
I do believe that the Declaration of Independence upholds the political principles of American values. Many people debate whether they're in support of it, because equal voting and women's rights weren't included, but back then that wasn't on their minds. They lived in the viewpoint that MEN were given all rights, because they were superior. Just as I wish equal rights for the LGBTQ community were included, but that was also something that seemed obscure in that time. Yes, I would have supported it. It made our country into what it is today, giving us many freedoms and rights that we wouldn't have, if were were still under the Parliament.
Full transcript