Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Robert Louis Stevenson

No description
by

Allie Wong

on 11 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson
by Allie Wong

What techniques does Robert Louis Stevenson use in his poems?
In his poems Robert Louis Stevenson uses descriptive language to express his story. His poems often contain imagery and personification. He also uses alliteration and rhyme to show style. Many of Stevenson's poems use meter, not necessarily a metrical pattern though. Something to take notice of is how Stevenson repetitivley uses multiple stanzas with four lines per stanza.
In winter I
get up
at
night
And dress by yellow candle-
light
.
In
summer
, quite the other
way
,
I have to go to
bed by
day
.

I have to go to
bed
and
see
The birds still hopping on the
tree
,
Or hear the
grown-up people's

feet
Still going past me in the
street
.

And does it not seem hard to
you
,
When
all the sky is clear and
blue
,
And I should like so much to
play
,
To have to go to
bed by
day
?
Where the bells peal far at
sea
Cunning
f
ingers
f
ashioned
me
.
There on palace walls

I

hung
While that Consuelo
sung
;
But
I

heard
, though

I

listened

well
,
N
ever a
n
ote,
n
ever a trill,
Never a
b
eat of the chiming
b
ell
.
There

I
hung
and looked, and
there
In
my

grey
f
ace,
f
aces
f
air
S
hone from under
s
hining
hair
.
Well,

I

saw
the poising
head
,
But the lips moved and nothing
said
;
And when lights were in the
hall
,
Silent moved the dancers
all
.
So awhile
I
glowed
, and
then
Fell on
d
usty
d
ays and
men
;
Long

I
s
l
umbered
packed in
s
traw
,
Long
I
none but dealers
saw
;
Till before
my
silent

eye
On that sees came passing
by
.
Now with an outlandish
grace
,
To the sparkling
f
ire
I

f
ace
In the blue room at *
Skerryvore
;
Where
I

wait
until the
door
Open, and the Prince of
Men
,
*Henry James, shall come
again
.

Bed In Summer
by Robert Louis Stevenson
1
2
3
5
10
A
A
B
B

C
C
D
D

E
E
B
B
The rhyme pattern does not use repetitively rhyming words, but there is rhyme in his poem. It follows an
AA
BB
CC
DD
pattern. No rhymes are repeated except for
BB
.
There are several lines that show how Stevenson uses imagery to create pictures. He describes nature and scenes. Stevenson does not use much figurative language in the poem.
Black

words are keywords.
8
8
8
8

8
8
8
8

8
8
8
8
This poem contains meter and iambic feet. There are eight syllables per line in every line. This poem is written in iambic tetrameter.
Great is the sun
, and wide
he

goes
Through
empty heaven
with
repose
;
And in the
blue
and
glowing
days
More thick than rain
he

showers his

rays
.

Though closer still the blinds we pull
To keep the shady parlour cool,
Yet
he
will find a chink or
two
To slip
his

golden fingers

through
.

The
dusty attic spider-
clad
He
, through the keyhole,
maketh
glad
;
And through the
broken edge of
tiles
Into the

l
addered hay-
l
oft

smiles
.

Meantime
his

golden face

around
He
bares to all the
g
arden
g
round
,
And
sheds a warm
and
glittering
look
Among the
i
vy's
i
nmost
nook
.

Above the hills, along the
blue
,
Round the
bright air
with footing
true
,
To
p
lease the child, to
p
aint the
rose
,
The gardener of the World,
he

goes
.
Summer Sun
by Robert Louis Stevenson
1
2
3
5
10
15
20
4
5
The Mirror Speaks
by Robert Louis Stevenson
5
10
15
20
25
How do you
like
to go up in a
swing
,
Up in the
air
so

blue
?
Oh, I do think it the
pleasantest
thing
Ever
a
c
hild
c
an
do
!

Up in the air and
over the
wall
,
Till I can
see so
wide
,
River and trees
and
cattle and
all
Over the

countryside
--

Till I look down on the
g
arden
g
reen
,
Down on the roof so
brown
--
Up in the air
I go
flying again,
Up in the air and
down
!
The Swing
By Robert Louis Stevenson
1
2
3
5
10
I have a little shadow that goes in and out
with
me
,
And what can be the
use of
him
is more than
I can
see
.
He is very, very
like me
from the
h
eels up to the
h
ead
;
And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my
bed
.

The funniest thing about
him
is the way he likes to
grow
--
Not at all like proper children
, which is always very
slow
;
For

he
sometimes

shoots up taller
like an india-rubber
ball
,
And
he
sometimes
goes so little that there's none of
him
at
al
l
.

He
hasn't
got a notion of how children ought to
play
,
And can only
make a fool of me
in every sort of
way
.
He
stays
so close behind me,
he's
a coward
you can
see
;
I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow
sticks to
me
!

One morning, very early, before the sun was
up
,
I
rose and found the shining dew on every
buttercup
;
But my
l
azy
l
ittle shadow,
l
ike an arrant sleepy
-
head
,
Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in
bed
.
My Shadow
by Robert Louis Stevenson
8
8
8
9

8
8
8
8

8
8
8
8
8
8
9
8

8
8
8
9

A
A
B
B

*
*
C
C

D
D
E
E

F
F
G
G

H
H
I
I
The rhyme pattern does not use repetitively rhyming words, but there is rhyme in this poem. It follows an
AA
BB
CC
DD
pattern. Stevenson skips a rhyme in two lines, but there is a near rhym. This is a stylistic choice Stevenson makes.
In this poem, Stevenson repetitively uses metrical lines. There is no pattern, but it is clear meter is present.
Stevenson uses
alliteration
in lines 12, 14,16, and 19.
Take notice to how Stevenson refers to the sun as
he
. Stevenson uses this technique in other poems too, such as the next one.
In many lines Stevenson uses
imagery
to create a picture in the readers mind. Also, Stevenson uses personification when talking about the sun.
Black
words are key words in the poem
A
A
B
B
C
*
C
D
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
H
H
I
I
J
J
K
K
L
L
x / x / x / x /
* Skerryvore was the name for Robert Louis Stevenson's house. This was the house many of his poems were written in
* Henry James was a friend of Robert Louis Stevenson.
Throughout this whole poem Stevenson uses personification. I infer this to be because he is writting as if he were the mirror. He wrote this poem while he was sick in bed and he was like a mirror. He heard and listened and watched. He also uses
I

and

my
to refer to the mirror. Words in
black
are key words.
7
7
7
6
8
8
9
7
7
7
7
8
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
7
7
7
There is no metrical pattern in this poem, but Stevenson does use shorter lines in this poem which is a style he uses across most of his poems.
This poem has an
AA
BB
CC
DD

pattern except for two words he throws in that break up the pattern. This is one stylistic choice Stevenson makes in several of his poems.
Stevenson uses repitition to draw attention to these particular lines and to create emphasis.
Alliteration
is used throughout this poem. This is one figurative language device that shows in many of Stevenson's poems
Again in this poem Stevenson uses
imagery
to paint an image.
A
B
A
B

C
D
C
D

*
E
*
E
10
6
10
6

9
6
9
6

9
6
10
6
The rhyme pattern in this poem is
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
D
. There are no repeating rhymes and the pattern is broken by two lines that do not rhyme, but there is a near rhyme.
There is no metrical pattern in this poem, but Stevenson does use lines of six syllables repetitively.
Alliteration
is used throughout this poem. This is one figurative language device that shows in many of Stevenson's poems
This poem contains
imagery
.
Black
words are key words.
1
2
5
10
15
3
4
A
A
B
B

C
C
D
D

E
E
F
F

G
G
B
B
14
14
15
15

15
15
16
15

14
15
14
15

13
14
15
14
Alliteration
is used throughout this poem. This is one figurative language device that shows in many of Stevenson's poems
In this poem Stevenson uses
similes
to compare two unlike things.
Throughout this whole poem Stevenson uses personification. He also uses he to refer to his shadow. Words in
black
are key words
He uses
imagery
to
form a picture.
There is no metrical pattern and unlike his other poems he uses longer lines.
Like many of his other poems Stevenson use an
AA
BB
CC
DD
pattern with the
B
rhyme repeating at the end.
As you can see there are several techniques and stylistic choices Robert Louis Stevenson makes throughout many of his poems. Stevenson uses rhyme patterns in many of his poems and occasionally uses words that do not fit the pattern to break the pattern. He also uses imagery in mostly all his poems. Stevenson usually uses multiple stanzas with four lines per poem. Besides imagery he also uses personification and alliteraton. Though Stevenson does not use a clear meterical pattern, his poems do contain meter or a sort of rhythm. These are the things that directly shape Stevenson's style in his poems.
Stevenson uses these phrases throughout his poem.
Full transcript