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Copy of Sonnet 18

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on 17 February 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Sonnet 18

Sonnet 18 and Romeo and Juliet
By: William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
His Works:
Sonnets

A sonnet is a poem regularly with 14 lines and a Iambic Pentameter

Iambic Pentameter: The basic unit of measure in a poem is the syllable and the pattern of syllables in a line which is stressed to unstressed
Born: April 26, 1564, Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

Died: April 23, 1616, Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

Spouse: Anne Hathaway (m. 1582–1616)

William Shakespeare
often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon"
38 plays
His Works:
2 long narrative poems
Sonneteer- one who writes sonnets
Shakespeare’s Sonnets
first published in a 1609 quarto entitled SHAKES-PEARES SONNETS
a collection of 154 sonnets dealing with themes such as the passage of:
-time
- love
-beauty
-mortality
can be seen as a prototype, or even the beginning of a new kind of “modern” poetry

Shakespeare’s Sonnets
 He plays with gender roles. (20)
 He comments on political events. (124)
 He makes fun of love. (128)
 He speaks openly about sexual desire. (129)
 He parodies beauty. (130)
 He references pornography. (151)

Structure:
Structure:
has 3 quatrains
has a 4-line stanza
Its final couplet is iambic pentameter.
a commonly used type of metrical line in traditional poetry and verse drama
Structure
rhyme scheme
a
b
a
b

c
d
c
d

e
f
e
f

g
g
Exceptions:
-
Sonnet 99
has
15 lines.
-
Sonnet 126
consists of
6 couplets and 2 blank lines.
-
Sonnet 145
is in
iambic tetrameters,
not pentameters.
-
Sonnet 29
’s rhyme scheme is
abab cdcd ebeb gg.

Characters:

FAIR YOUTH
- the unnamed young man to whom sonnets 1-126 are addressed


DARK LADY
- distinguishes itself from the FAIR YOUTH sequence by being overtly in its passion (127-152

THE RIVAL POET
- identity remains a mistery (78-86)
-competes for fame, coin and patronage


PROCREATION SONNETS
-are grouped together because they all address the same young man, and all encourage him with a variety of themes and arguments- to marry and have children
Romeo and Juliet
By William Shakespeare
JULIET:
Hist! Romeo, hist! O, for a falconer's voice,
To lure this tassel-gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse, and may not speak aloud;
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine,
With repetition of my Romeo's name.
ROMEO:
It is my soul that calls upon my name:
How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears!
JULIET:
Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day:
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear;
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree:
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.
ROMEO:
It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east:
Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.
was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist
Sonnet 18
By William Shakespeare
Characters:

Ruling house of Verona

Prince Escalus

is the ruling Prince of Verona

Count Paris

is a kinsman of Escalus who wishes to marry Juliet.

Mercutio

is another kinsman of Escalus, and a friend of Romeo.
Prince Escalus
ROMEO:
She speaks!
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o'er my head
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.
JULIET:
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
154 sonnets
Fair Youth
The Rival Poet
Characters:
Sonnet 18
one of the most famous of all the sonnets
links in with so many of the other sonnets through the themes of:
-descriptive power of verse
-the ability of the poet to depict the fair youth adequately
-immortality conveyed through being hymned in these eternal lines
Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

House of Capulet
Capulet
is the patriarch of the house of Capulet.

Lady Capulet
is the matriarch of the house of Capulet.

Juliet
is the 13-year-old daughter of Capulet, and the play's female protagonist.

Characters:
House of Capulet
Tybalt

is a cousin of Juliet, and the nephew of Lady Capulet.

The Nurse

is Juliet's personal attendant and confidante.

Rosaline

is Lord Capulet's niece, and Romeo's love in the beginning of the story.
Peter, Sampson and Gregory
are servants of the Capulet household.
Characters:
House of Montague
Montague
is the patriarch of the house of Montague.

Lady Montague
is the matriarch of the house of Montague.

Romeo
is the son of Montague, and the play's male protagonist.

Characters:
House of Montague
Benvolio
is Romeo's cousin and best friend.

Abram and Balthasar
are servants of the Montague household.

Other Characters:
Friar Laurence
is a Franciscan friar, and is Romeo's confidant.

Friar John
is sent to deliver Friar Laurence's letter to Romeo.

An Apothecary
who reluctantly sells Romeo poison.

A Chorus
reads a prologue to each of the first two acts.
Shakespearean Tragedy
classification of drama written by W. Shakespeare
has noble protagonist
flawed in some way
placed in a stressful
heightened situation
and ends with a fatal
conclusion
10 Shakespeare's plays classified
as tragedies:
1. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Analysis
The stock comparisons of the loved one to all the beauteous things in nature.
more lovely
2. Thou art
more temperate:
and
Analysis
The speaker stipulates what mainly differentiates the young man from the summer's day.
Analysis
3. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
Summer's days tend toward extremes: they are shaken by rough winds.
4. And summer's lease hath all too short
Analysis
The summer holds a lease on part of the year, but the lease is too short and has an early termination.
5. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven
shines,
6. And often his gold complexion dimmed,
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
8.
7.
Analysis
Themes

SONNET 99
1.
The forward violet thus did I chide:
2
. Sweet thief, whence didst thou steal thy sweet that smells,
3.
If not from my love's breath? The purple pride
4.
Which on thy soft cheek for complexion dwells
5.
In my love's veins thou hast too grossly dyed.
6.
The lily I condemned for thy hand,
7.
And buds of marjoram had stol'n thy hair:
8.
The roses fearfully on thorns did stand,
9.
One blushing shame, another white despair;
10.
A third, nor red nor white, had stol'n of both
11.
And to his robbery had annex'd thy breath;
12.
But, for his theft, in pride of all his growth
13.
A vengeful canker eat him up to death.

14.
More flowers I noted, yet I none could see

15.
But sweet or colour it had stol'n from thee.
O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power
Dost hold Time's fickle glass, his sickle, hour;
Who hast by waning grown, and therein show'st
Thy lovers withering as thy sweet self grow'st;
If Nature, sovereign mistress over wrack,
As thou goest onwards, still will pluck thee back,
She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill
May time disgrace and wretched minutes kill.
Yet fear her, O thou minion of her pleasure;
She may detain, but not still keep, her treasure:
Her audit, though delay'd, answer'd must be,
And her quietus is to render thee.
( )
( )
Sonnet 126
Those lips
/
that Love's
/
own hand
/
did make
Breathed forth the sound that said 'I hate,'
To me that languish'd for her sake:
But when she saw my woeful state,
Straight in her heart did mercy come,
Chiding that tongue that ever sweet
Was used in giving gentle doom,
And taught it thus anew to greet:
'I hate' she alter'd with an end,
That follow'd it as gentle day
Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heaven to hell is flown away;
'I hate' from hate away she threw,
And saved my life, saying -- 'not you.'

Sonnet 145
When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,
(a)
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
(b)
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
(a)
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
(b)
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
(c)
Featur'd like him, like him with friends possess'd,
(d)
Desiring this man's art and that man's scope,
(c)
With what I most enjoy contented least;
(d)
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
(e)
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
(b)
Like to the lark at break of day arising
(e)
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;
(b)
For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings
(g)
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
(g)
Sonnet 29
Dark Lady
The
eye of the heaven
that the poet was referring to in this line is the
sun.
Sometimes the sun shines too hot.
Analysis
There are times that the golden rays of the sun would be dimmed by clouds and on overcast days generally.
Analysis
All beautiful things occasionally become inferior in comparison with their essential previous state of beauty. They all decline from perfection.
Analysis
By chance accidents, or by the fluctuating tides of nature, which are not subject to control, nature's changing course untrimmed.
Analysis
Analysis
13. For as long as humans live and breathe upon the earth, for as long as there are seeing eyes on earth.
14. That is how this verses will live, celebrating you, and continually renewing your life.
Structure:
has a couplet
A
couplet
is a pair of lines of metre in poetry.
Couplets
usually comprise two lines that rhyme and have the same metre.
Sonnet 145
11. Nor will death claim you for his own,
12. Because in my eternal verse you will live forever.
Analysis
9. But your youth shall not fade,
10. Nor will you lose the beauty that you possess;
Beauty may fade but love is eternal.
Summer's lease
is compared to something which is very short, as a rental period.
The eye of heaven
describes the sun.
Eternal lines
refers to the theme.
In his shade
describes the shadow of death and darkness.
METAPHOR
PERSONIFICATION
is immortal and thus, makes beauty immortal.
Sun
Wind
Death
Summer
Sonnet 126
Titus Andronicus (1591–1592)


Julius Caesar (1599-1600)
Hamlet (1660–1601)

Othello (1604–1605)
King Lear (1605–1606)
Macbeth (1605-1606)
Timon of Athens (1605–1608)
Antony and Cleopatra (1606-1607)
Coriolanus (1606-1608)
Romeo and Juliet (1594-1595)
Juliet
Peter
Tybalt
Sampson and Gregory
Nurse
Lady Montague
Romeo
Adam
Apothecary
Friar John
Friar Lawrence
A Chorus
Act 1, Prologue:
PROLOGUE
Act 1, Scene 1:

Verona. A public
place.
Act 1, Scene 2:

A street.
Act 1, Scene 3
:
A room in Capulet's house.
Act 1, Scene 4:
A street.
Act 1, Scene 5:
A hall in Capulet's house.
Act 2, Prologue:

PROLOGUE
Act 2, Scene 1:
A lane by the wall of Capulet's orchard
.
Act 2, Scene 2:

Capulet's orchard
.
Act 2, Scene 3:

Friar Laurence's cell.
Act 2, Scene 4:
A street.
Act 2, Scene 5:

Capulet's orchard.
Act 2, Scene 6:
Friar Laurence's
cell.
Act 3, Scene 1:
A public place.
Act 3, Scene 2:
Capulet's orchard.
Act 3, Scene 3:
Friar Laurence's cell.
Act 3, Scene 4:
A room in Capulet's house.
Act 3, Scene 5
: Capulet's orchard.
Act 4, Scene 1:
Friar Laurence's cell.
Act 4, Scene 2:
Hall in Capulet's house.
Act 4, Scene 3:
Juliet's chamber.
Act 4, Scene 4:
Hall in Capulet's house.
Act 4, Scene 5:
Juliet's chamber.
Act 5, Scene 1:
Mantua. A street.
Act 5, Scene 2:
Friar Laurence's cell.
Act 5, Scene 3:
A churchyard; in it a tomb belonging to the Capulets.
Romeo and Juliet is composed of
5 Acts,
each contains
Scenes (24).
Both Act 1 and 2
has
Prologues
.

Setting:
thirteenth or fourteenth century in Italy in Verona and Mantua.
Time:

Italy in Verona and Mantua.
Much of the action takes place in Juliet’s house.
Place:
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Denouement
Exposition
Full transcript