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Welcome to Service-Learning

The basics of Service-Learning
by

Amy Simer

on 18 October 2012

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Transcript of Welcome to Service-Learning

Welcome to
Service-Learning! II.
Service-Learning is Not... Internships/Practicum/Field Experience Service-Learning ...volunteerism, community service, internship,
field education. These do provide students with service
opportunities but are not fully integrated into their studies. V.
Why Use Service-Learning? "Why Service-Learning?" Benefits to Faculty:
Encourage between students and faculty

Add new insights and dimensions to class discussions

Develop students' civic and leadership skills

Promote students' active learning

Implement different learning styles Benefits to Community: Network with possible employees

Receive assistance free of charge

Increase public awareness of key issues

Help prepare today's students to be tomorrow's civic leaders

Inject new energy, enthusiasm, and perspectives into the organization's work http://www.compact.org/wp-content/uploads/resources/downloads/aag.pdf Benefits to Students: http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/PDFs/rhowas.pdf Models of Service-Learning Service learning can take many forms, but most service-learning courses fit into the following categories: III.
What Does Service-Learning
Look Like? ENGLISH Students help elementary school children understand and perform Macbeth The possibilities
are ENDLESS! Service Learning can be executed in almost any area of study. For example.. Journalism, Landscape Architecture, and Family & Consumer Sciences students work together to plan and build a community garden MULTIPLE CLASSES
COLLABORATING Examples of Service Learning Students design products to help disabled individuals with every day activities. Discipline based
Problem- or Project-based
Capstone
Community-based action research Discipline-Based students apply skills and information from the classroom into a real-world setting. They are expected to be out in the community through out the year and reflect through out the year. Problem- or Project-Based student teams or entire class serve as “consultants “ to a community agency. Capstone Service-Learning These courses are generally designed for majors and minors in a given discipline and are offered almost exclusively to students in their final year. Community-Based Action Research A relatively new approach that is gaining popularity, students evaluate the status of a problem in the community and also create a plan for improvement or change regarding the problem. Example: Nurses put on a quarterly blood drive. Example: Marketing students create a marketing plan for a non profit. CHEMISTRY ENGINEERING Example: Psychology students collaborate with a shelter to survey community attitudes towards homelessness for a city-wide awareness campaign. For more great examples of service-learning projects around the nation, visit: Example: Engineering students use design and project management skills to create a product for an individual or community partner. Portland State University (video): California State University (video): http://bit.ly/eYRL6w http://bit.ly/gwq0BL Students collect and test water samples for the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality while learning how to use equipment and understand lab protocol ART Students make sculptures for non profits around the community. Volunteering & Community Service Projects primary focus is on the service being provided,
benefits the recipients.
does not include reflection engages students in service activities primarily for the purpose of providing students with hands-on experiences.
benefits the Integrates community service with the structured learning
helps students develop critical reflection
increase their civic awareness Which of the benefits of service-learning are most appealing to you? Why? Which model do you think would best fit your service-learning project in your class?

if you do not teach, pretend. Stop & Write #6 Stop & Write #3 IV.
What are the Key Components
of Service-Learning? Service-Learning Best Practices Guiding Principles for Service-Learning Address the students training needs, the risks and the responsibility of the students. Principles of Good Practice for Combining Service and Learning: A Wingspread Special Report The learning itself is what is graded not the service. The service experience is connected to the course through reflective readings, projects, and class presentations. Reflection on the service experience is ongoing and includes dialogue about community issues and the need for the service. For example: Students, faculty and community representatives participate in evaluating the service-learning experience. Course includes structured reflection. Course content and service experience are integrated. Service experience meets a community need. Relevant Service Academic Material Critical Reflection* Service-Learning The process of reflection is a core component of service-learning. Structured opportunities for reflection can enable learners to examine and form their beliefs, values, opinions, assumptions, judgments and practices related to an action or experience, gain a deeper understanding of them and construct their own meaning and significance for future actions (Moon 1999) Learn & Serve America: Service-Learning Clearinghouse: Additional service-learning theory resources: Community College National Center for Community Engagement: Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: To have effective service learning, it must be planned out and executed throughout the year. Service Learning must be created with the needs of students learning and the community needs. The project should benefit both equally. Successful service-learning Curricular happens when the student connects learning into the service project. Civic Responsibility Service experience promotes sense of civic responsibility Successful service-learning will help the student see the difference they made in the community and help to tie their learning with every day activities. http://bit.ly/cUb3hJ http://bit.ly/caNXPp http://bit.ly/aZ6hhs Choose three "best practices" and describe how you would implement them in your course. For example: How would you plan to become acquainted with your community partner? Stop & Write #5 VI.
Planning Service-Learning During the Semester: 1. Explain service-learning: Teach the students about service learning and it importance.

2. Guide reflection: Guide the students through their reflection in order to get the best results. 3. Monitor progress: Stay in contact with your agency partners.

4. Evaluate & assess: Evaluate the students participation and learning. Asses your teaching. Review & References Before the Semester Begins: 1. Access staff support: find out what resources are available to you. 2. Review sample syllabi: Get ideas on learning objectives and ways to execute the project. 3. Contact organizations: Ste up a schedule to meet with your agency partner throughout the year. Discuss goals and objectives. 4. Design Course: Use your lecture, assignments and activities to address the service project while integrating the curriculum. Stop & Ask Do you have any questions? I.
Service Learning is... Students participate in a service project that enhances the subject being learned. How It Works Specifically, service learning integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, encourage lifelong civic engagement, and strengthen communities for the common good. How would you describe service learning to a student? Stop & Write #1 Planning Reflection Implementation Students need to be acquainted with the partner agency. They need to be aware of the needs of the agency. develop a syllabus that incorporates a community service projects with the curriculum of the class.
For example: Partner agencies define their needs and are included in planning for the service. The faculty member must become acquainted with their partner agency. They must learn the agency and how it works. Service learning is a method of teaching that combines formal instruction with a related service in the community. “Service-learning is deeply rooted in the action-reflection theories of John Dewey and David Kolb, who both describe the importance of combining individual action and engagement with reflective thinking to develop greater understanding of the content being studied". http://bit.ly/bNYCoj Students reflect on the project in order to examine their own beliefs, values, and opinions as related to their experience. Service learning's roots began with the action-reflection theories of John Dewey. "What is Service-Learning?" Theoretical Foundations of Service-Learning John Dewey

Kurt Lewin

Jean Piaget

David A. Kolb What kind of project might best fit the learning objectives for your course? Brainstorm at least two possible service-learning projects.

If you do not teach, pretend. Stop & Write #4 Increase your understanding of the class topic

exposure to different learning styles

Broader range of hands on experiences

Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills

Connect with professionals and community members who you will learn from

Explore or cement your values and beliefs Adapted from Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact. Benefits of Service-Learning Additional Reading Service-Learning Continuum The chart below offers another perspective on a continuum between volunteerism and internships. (Tanner, 2006) "Dewey's theory of experiential education also is reflected in other critical service-learning components, such as the construction of learning outcomes, the use of group-based activities in the learning process, the use of "educative" rather than "miseducative" experiences, the reliance on the organic link between what is learned and personal experience, and opportunities for students to learn the value of altruism and personal responsibility." (Crews 1999) Education & Urban Society (Kraft, 1996) Adapted from Boise State University Service-Learning Program
"Planning to Use Service-Learning: Recommended Steps" "Learning Objectives" "Reflection" How would you explain the difference between service learning, volunteering and internships to a student? Stop & Write #2 (Lewis-Clark State College, 2009)
http://bit.ly/rXjdm9 Additional Reading "At A Glance: What We Know About The Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions and Communities" Additional Reading "How Service Learning Affects Students" (Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/twSbO9 (Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/s5cW18 Bonar, L, Buchanan, R, Fisher, I, & Wechsler, A. (1996). Service-learning in the curriculum: A faculty guide to course development. Salt Lake City, UT: Lowell Bennion Community Service Center. Morton, K, & Troope, M. (1996). From the margin to the mainstream: Campus Compact's project on integrating service with academic study. Journal of Business Ethics, 15(1), 21-32. Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and education. New York: Collier Books. Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall. Crews, R. “Benefits of service-learning.” Communications for a Sustainable Future . Boulder , CO : University of Colorado at Boulder , 1999. Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact. Meredith College. (2005). Service learning as part of civic engagement: Faculty guide to service learning. Informally published manuscript, Service Learning, Meredith College, Raleigh, NC. Retrieved from http://www.meredith.edu/academics/servicelearning/facguide_final_draft-1.pdf Tanner, K. (2006). Service learning: learning by doing and doing what matters. Informally published manuscript, Montana State University, Office for Community Involvement, Bozeman, MT. Retrieved from http://www.montana.edu/teachlearn/Papers/Service%20learning.pdf Boise State University Service-Learning Program. (2011). Planning to use service-learning: recommended steps. Retrieved from http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/faculty/planning.asp Hurd, C. (2007). The CSU service-learning program's guiding principles. The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved from http://teaching.colostate.edu/guides/servicelearning/principles_guidingprinciples.cfm Lewis-Clark State College. (2009). Service-learning at lewis-clark state college. [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/user/LCServiceCorps#p/a/u/1/Cmx4T0zDXzo Additional Reading Service-Learning a method of teaching that combines formal instruction with a related service in the community. students reflect on the project in order to examine their own beliefs, values, and opinions as related to their experience. Theory
-Influenced by the theories of John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Jean Piaget, David A. Kolb Volunteering, Internships & Service-Learning Volunteering & Community Service: focus mainly on the recipient and not the giver. They are not tied into course material. Internships/Practicum/Field Experience: hands on experience but not beneficial. to the community Service-Learning: benefits both the giver and the receiver. Models of Service-Learning Discipline-based: students apply skills and information from the classroom into a real-world setting. They are expected to be out in the community through out the year and reflect through out the year. Problem or Project-based: student teams or entire class serve as “consultants “ to a community agency. Capstone: These courses are generally designed for majors and minors in a given discipline and are offered almost exclusively to students in their final year. Community-Based Action Research: A relatively new approach that is gaining popularity, students evaluate the status of a problem in the community and also create a plan for improvement or change regarding the problem. Critical reflection- make sure students reflect on their learning. Relevant service- Make sure service is relevant to the lesson and community Academic material- develop a syllabus that incorporates a community service projects with the curriculum of the class. Key Components Best Practices Planning: Seek support and examples Implementation: Familiarize students woth service learning and their agency partner Reflection: guide reflection in order to help students identify the benefits of their hard work and in order to help evaluate their progress. Benefits of
Service-Learning Community: Inject new energy, enthusiasm, and perspectives into the organization's work Faculty: Opportunities for utilizing different teaching methods, gaining enrollment and retention rates. Students: Increased civic responsibility, enhanced hands on learning, and network with potential employers. Review References (Boise State University, 2009)
http://bit.ly/uH3HWH http://www.Wikipedia.com
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