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Past continuous and Present perfect continuous.

Group #2 // Oral presentation 2.

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Transcript of Past continuous and Present perfect continuous.

Present Perfect Continuous.
Present Perfect Continuous.
Summary.
Past Continuous.
Past Continuous.
Telephone
11C
City, State
.
.
USES:
PLATFORMS
Social
SOCIAL
SEO
CMS
GROUP #2
PAST CONTINUOUS AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS.
Isabel Sofía Ballén
- Concept maps and search info.
Paula Camila Prieto
- Presentation and search info.
Karen Salamanca
- Worksheets and search info.
-Interrupted actions in the Past:
to indicate that a longer action in the past was interrupted. The interruption is usually a shorter action in the Simple Past. Remember this can be a real interruption or just an interruption in time.
Specific time as an interruption:
In USE 1, described above, the Past Continuous is interrupted by a shorter action in the Simple Past.
STRUCTURE:
-Repetition and Irritation with "Always":
The Past Continuous with words such as "always" or "constantly" expresses the idea that something irritating or shocking often happened in the past.
USES:
However, you can also use a specific time as an interruption.
IMPORTANT:
In the Simple Past, a specific time is used to show when an action began or finished. In the Past Continuous, a specific time only interrupts the action.
-Last night at 6 PM, I ate dinner.
I started eating at 6 PM.

-Last night at 6 PM, I was eating dinner.
I started earlier; and at 6 PM, I was in the process of eating dinner.
-Parallel Actions:
When you use the Past Continuous with two actions in the same sentence, it expresses the idea that both actions were happening at the same time. The actions are parallel.
-Atmosphere:
To describe the atmosphere at a particular time in the past.
Remember to put the words "always" or "constantly" between "be" and "verb+ing."
POSITIVE:
NEGATIVE:
WH QUESTIONS:
YES/ NO QUESTIONS:
-You were studying when she called.
-While we were having the picnic, it started to rain.
-At midnight, we were still driving through the desert.
-I was studying while he was making dinner.
-He was constantly talking. He annoyed everyone.
SUBJECT + WAS/ WERE + VERB IN "ING" FORM + COMPLEMENT.
-You were not studying when she called.
-You were not listening to me when I told you to turn the oven off.
-Last night at 6 PM, I wasn't eating dinner.
-Thomas wasn't working, and I wasn't working either.
- She wasn't paying attention while I was writing the letter, so I made several mistakes.
SUBJECT + WAS / WERE + NOT + VERB IN GERUND + COMPLEMENT.
-What were you doing when the earthquake started?
-What were you doing while you were waiting?
-Where were you singing last night?
-How was she going in class?
-What were you doing when you broke your leg?
WH AUX. + WAS / WERE + SUBJECT + VERB IN "ING" FORM + COMPLEMENT+ ?
-Were you studying when she called?
-Was she writing while I was talking?
-Were we playing the same song?
-Was I dancing right?
-Were you paying attention in the class?
WAS / WERE + SUBJECT + VERB IN GERUND + COMPLEMENT + ? .


Clauses are groups of words which have meaning, but are often not complete sentences. Some clauses begin with the word
"when"
,
"while"
. When you talk about things in the past, "when" is most often followed by the verb tense Simple Past, whereas "while" is usually followed by Past Continuous. "While" expresses the idea of "during that time."


WHILE VS. WHEN:
-I was studying when she called.
-While I was studying, she called.
Non-Continuous Verbs / Mixed Verbs:
Non-Continuous Verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Also, certain non-continuous meanings for Mixed Verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Instead of using Past Continuous with these verbs, you must use Simple Past.
-Jane was being at my house when you arrived.
-Jane was at my house when you arrived.
ADVERB PLACEMENT:
-You were just studying when she called.

-Were you just studying when she called?
Duration from the Past Until Now:
To show that something started in the past and has continued up until now.


"For five minutes," "for two weeks," and "since Tuesday" are all durations which can be used.
Recently, Lately:
We can also use it WITHOUT a duration such as "for two weeks." Without the duration, the tense has a more general meaning of "lately."

We often use the words "lately" or "recently" to emphasize this meaning.
STRUCTURE:
AFFIRMATIVE:
-You have been waiting here for two hours.
-They have been talking for the last hour.
-James has been teaching at the university since June.
-Recently, I have been feeling really tired.
-Recently, John has been doing the work.
SUBJECT + HAVE / HAS + BEEN + VERB IN "ING" + COMPLEMENT.
NEGATIVE:
SUBJECT + HAVE / HAS + NOT + BEEN + VERB IN "ING" + COMPLEMENT.
-You have not been waiting here for two hours.
-Lisa has not been practicing her English.
-I haven't listened to that song yet.
-My mom has not cooked since de '03.
-They haven't put effort in their education
WH QUESTIONS:
-What have you been doing for the last 30 minutes?
-Why has Nancy not been taking her medicine for the last three days?
-Where have you been running?
-How long have we been watching this film?
-Why has she been working today?
WH AUX. + HAVE / HAS + SUBJECT + BEEN + VERB IN GERUND + COMPLEMENT + ?.
YES / NO QUESTIONS:
-Have you been waiting here for two hours?
-Has she done her dinner?
-Have they practiced tennis?
-Has it worked properly?
-Have you written the letter?
HAVE / HAS + SUBJECT + P.P OF THE VERB + COMPLEMENT + ?.
IMPORTANT:

The Present Perfect Continuous has the meaning of "lately" or "recently." If you use the it in a question such as "Have you been feeling alright?", it can suggest that the person looks sick or unhealthy. A question such as "Have you been smoking?" can suggest that you smell the smoke on the person. Using this tense in a question suggests you can see, smell, hear or feel the results of the action.
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