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MODEL OF ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA

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Kirby Maine Manunuan

on 30 August 2016

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Transcript of MODEL OF ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA

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Ptolemaic Model
Claudius Ptolemy lived in Rome around 100 AD. His model of the solar system and heavenly sphere was a refinement of previous models developed by Greek astronomers. Ptolemy’s major contribution, however, was that his model could so accurately explain the motions of heavenly bodies, it became the model for understanding the structure of the solar system

Copernican Model

-astronomical model developed by Nicolaus Copernicus and published in 1543. It positioned the Sun near the center of the Universe, motionless, with Earth and the other planets rotating around it in circular paths modified by epicycles and at uniform speeds.

Copernican Model
Ptolemaic Model
Tychonic System
The Copernican model departed from the Ptolemaic system that prevailed in Western culture for centuries, placing Earth at the center of the Universe, and is often regarded as the launching point to modern astronomy and the Scientific Revolution
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MODEL OF ASTRONOMICAL
PHENOMENA



model accounted
for the apparent motions
of the planets in a very
direct way, by assuming
that each planet moved
on a small sphere or circle,
called an epicycle, that moved on a larger sphere or circle, called a deferent. The stars, it was assumed, moved on a celestial sphere around the outside of the planetary spheres.
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