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Hop Frog by: Edgar Allen Poe

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garrett barr

on 3 March 2015

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Transcript of Hop Frog by: Edgar Allen Poe

About Hop Frog the character
Photos
Sources
Status Update
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Hop Frog has repulsive, large, and powerful teeth. His arms are not in balance with his body but are very powerful as well. He is a fool for the king and can do acrobatic things because of his arms.
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pictures: google images

power point: prezi.com

information on summary: google classroom

information on the facts: google classroom

this is the info under status update :http://storyoftheweek.loa.org/2010/08/hop-frog.html

Facts
Hop Frog is a dwarf and a fool for the king.

The King and his ministers enact Eight Chained ourang-outangs

Masquerade means a false show or pretense.

Hop Frogs arms are very strong and powerful.
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Made by: Garrett Barr, Eliah Ferral, Nathan Steele, and April Estes
Hop Frog by: Edgar Allen Poe

summary
Hop Frog is written by Edgar Allen Poe. Hop Fog is about a frog that is a fool for the king and has to be able to entertain the king at a moments notice. Hop Frog is forced to drink wine by the king because the king says it will make him do better at entertaining him. Its also about the king and his ministers going to a masquerade and enacting the Eight Chained ourang-outangs.
In 1849—only months before he died—Edgar Allan Poe wrote to Nancy Richmond (a married woman whom he had befriended and nicknamed “Annie”) about one of the very last stories to be published during his lifetime:

https://vimeo. com/54592198
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