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Sweeten Your Sentences

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by

Anita Melendez

on 15 December 2014

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Transcript of Sweeten Your Sentences

How to Use Sentence Variety

To

Sweeten

Up Your Writing!
People normally

talk

and

write
using ONE boring sentence
pattern:
Subject/Verb
Subject/Verb
Subject/Verb
BORING!!
Can you
believe this?
What IS that
pattern,
you ask?
Here are some examples
of what I mean:

I have an adorable dog named Rosa.
She is a little brown Dachshund with
beautiful eyes. Rosa sleeps on her
bed most of the day. I throw her toy
for her every day after school. My dog
is the cutest pet in the entire world.
Even though there
are plenty of details . . .
. . . using ADVERBS & ADJECTIVES . . .
on

the couch

(where)
most

of the day

(when)
every

day after school

(how often)
adorable, Rosa, little, brown, beautiful, cutest, entire
It is
STILL
written in a subject/verb
pattern
.

I have
an
adorable
dog named
Rosa
.
She is
a
little

brown

Dachshund
with
beautiful
eyes.
Rosa sleeps

on the couch most of the day
.
I throw
her toy for her
every day after school
.
My
dog is
the
cutest
pet in the
entire
world.
When you
constantly
write
in this sentence pattern . . .
You sound as if
you're making a list:
I have
She is
Rosa sleeps
I throw
dog is
SUBJECT/VERB
UGH!
Time
to
SHAKE
it up!
subject/verb
subject/verb
subject/verb

is
suitable
for informal, everyday
talking to
communicate . . .
. . . BECAUSE . . .
all serve to
"Sweeten

up"
your speech!

When you are talking,
your
FACIAL
EXPRESSIONS,

HAND GESTURES
BODY LANGUAGE

&
However, when writing
you
MUST
use a variety
of sentence patterns.
because talking
and writing
are
TWO
different things!!
Problem:
I can't think of ways to change my boring
subject/verb sentences to better ones.
Solution:
First, learn a few different "fancy"
sentence structures. Then, after
you finish a paragraph (or your
entire paper),
REVISE
some of
your sentences.
Question?
How many
of my sentences
should I revise?
All
of them?
A few
of them?
One
in each paragraph?
WHAT?
ANSWER:
Concentrate on your body paragraphs.
Revise
2-3 sentences. Afterward, read your paper and revise some more if you think it needs it.
What are some of the
BEST
kinds of sentences to use?
Start with an
"
ing
" or "
ed
"
word
Words that have
"
ing
" or "
ed
" added
to them are
VERBS
.
If you start a sentence
with one of these
words, you are
starting your sentence
with
ACTION!!
LET'S TRY!!
Sam

looked
down the dark
hallway. He

tried
to imagine
what was hiding there.
Look
ing
down the dark hallway,
Sam tried to imagine what was
hiding there.
Makes your
writing stronger!
You also sound
like a robot.
subject/verb subject/verb
subject/verb subject/verb
subject/verb subject/verb
subject/verb subject/verb
TRY AGAIN!
Katie
was amazed
at the size of the
crocodile. She
backed
away from
the edge of the river.
Amazed
at the size of the crocodile,
Katie backed away from the edge of
the river.
Using this strategy does
TWO
things:

1.) It
"actions up"
the start of your
sentence
2.) I helps you
combine
two short robot
sentences into one longer sentence.
Use an appositive phrase.
YOU DON'T HAVE
TO REMEMBER
THAT TERM!
When you use this strategy,
you
rename something
. It
also
allows you to make one
long sentence out two short
ones.
LIKE THIS.
Jessica is
the captain of the
volleyball team.
She is
the best
player.
Jessica
, the captain of the
volleyball team,
is the
school's
best player.
YAWN!
These are
EASY
fixes.
You just have to be aware of the
POSSIBILITIES!
NEXT . . .
Use this formula:
"TO"
+
A VERB
= Energetic action!
In other words, start your
sentence with the word

"To"
and a verb
.

Example:

To go
To see
To play
To imagine
HERE'S HOW
Jason would love
to go hiking
in Colorado
.
To go hiking in Colorado
would
be Jason's greatest wish.
subject
verb
subject
verb
subject
verb
subject
verb prase
Start your sentence with an
Introductory Adverb Claus.
An adverb clause begins with a subordinating conjunction.
That's fancy talk for:
It can't stand on it's
own as a sentence.
Like a baby
that needs
momma.
Try
starting
your sentences with these words:
When, While, Until, Since,
If, After, Before, Although,
Even though, As long as,
As soon as, Whenever . . .
The list does go on, so
just try these!
HERE WE GO!!
I finished my homework. Then I called
Kelly.
When

I finished my homework
,
I called
Kelly.

Until

I finished my homework
,
I could
not call Kelly.

As soon as

I finish my homework
,
I can
call Kelly.
subject
verb
DON'T
forget
the
comma!
YOU TRY!
Told you it
was easy!
Here's another one!
The next one you are already
familiar with . . .

CONJUNCTIONS
You know . . .
FANBOYS
Let's review
Compound sentences connects two short simple sentences into a longer more interesting sentence using a
comma
and a
conjunction
. . .
FANBOYS
YOU REMEMBER!
We went
to the movies last night.
It was
exciting.
We went to the movies last night,
and
it was exciting.
OR
We went to the movies last night,
but
it was boring.
zzz
Finally, something
with some KICK!!
LAST ONE!
Try starting your
sentences with a
SERIES
of
prepositional phrases
.
A preposition can easily be recognized
as "Whatever a mouse can do to a house"
Here's what is
meant by that.
A mouse can:
go
in
a house

go
around
a house

go
behind
a house

go
inside
a house

go
beneath
a house

go
under
a house

go
out
of a house

go
without
a house
Get it?
A little more advanced?
YES, but worth it.
Here's how.
I can see
the junk under my bed
in my room.
(
In
my room
) (
under
my bed
), I can
see the junk.
In my room under my bed, I can see
the junk.
subject
verb
1
2
sooo
sleepy!
YES!!
Remember,
speaking
and
writing
are two
VERY
different forms of
communication.
VS.
Take the time to look at how
you started each of your
sentences, then take the time
to
REVISE
!
Using a
VARIETY
of
sentence structures,
you will become a
much better writer.
And that's
SWEET
!
subject
verb
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