Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

16.3 Providing First aid for Bleeding and Wounds

Allied Helth
by

Francis Morales

on 3 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 16.3 Providing First aid for Bleeding and Wounds

Providing First Aid for
Bleeding and Wounds

When providing first aid for wounds your main goals are to control bleeding before it leads to death and prevent treatment for infection
OPEN WOUNDS
CLOSED WOUNDS
and
TYPES OF WOUNDS
Abrasion
caused by scraping off the skin
Puncture
caused by a sharp pointed object,
the wound is deeper than it is wide
Incision
caused by a sharp object such as a knife
Avulsion
Laceration
Amputation
when a body structure is torn
or detached from the body
deep cut or tear in the skin
body part is cut off
4 Methods
for Controlling Bleeding
Direct
Pressure
Elevation
Pressure
Points
Pressure
Bandage
Bleeding and Infections
to prevent infection, wear gloves or plastic wrap and wash hands before and after gloves. Use a disinfectant to clean up blood and spills.

signs of infection: swelling, pain, heat, redness, pus, and fever.
Main Pressure Points
ARM :brachial artery
(halfway between the armpit and the elbow)


LEG: femoral artery
(front middle point of the upper leg)
If an object is embedded deep in the tissue,
go to a physician to get it surgically removed.

Symptoms of a closed wound

pain
tenderness
swelling
deformity
cold/clammy skin
rapid/weak pulse
drop in blood pressure
uncontrolled restlessness
Treatment for a closed wound
check breathing
check for shock
avoid unnecessary movement
avoid giving fluids or any food to victims

Another condition to be prepared to treat while caring for wounds is shock.
Shock is a medical emergency where the organs and tissues of the body aren’t receiving an adequate flow of blood. This deprives the organs and tissues of oxygen and it can result in serious damage, or even death.

Treating shock includes:
keeping the patient warm, with legs raised and head down to improve blood flow to the brain
putting a needle in a vein in order to give fluids or blood transfusions
giving the patient extra oxygen to breathe and medications to improve the heart's functioning
treating the underlying condition which led to shock.

Arterial Blood
Spurts from wound, and is bright red.
Venous Blood
Slower than arterial blood, constant, and dark red
Capillary Blood
Oozes from wound slowly, and is less red than arterial blood.
Types of Bleeding
Sources
"Predicting early death in patients with traumatic bleeding: development and validation of prognostic model | BMJ." Home | BMJ. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Sept. 2013.

Simmers, Louise, Karen Nartker, and Sharon Kobelak. "16:3 Providing First Aid for Bleeding and Wounds." Diversified health occupations. 7th ed. Australia: Delmar Cengage Learning, 2009. 473-479. Print.
Severe bleeding accounts for about one third of in-hospital deaths due to trauma and is an important contributory factor for other causes of death.
Failure to start appropriate early management in bleeding trauma patients is a leading cause of preventable death from trauma.
DID YOU KNOW THAT
Full transcript