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Late revision: Lit Paper One: Section A: Macbeth Final Exam Practice

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Paul Hanson

on 19 May 2018

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Transcript of Late revision: Lit Paper One: Section A: Macbeth Final Exam Practice

Literature Paper One
Section A: 'Macbeth' (34 marks)
Section B: 'A Christmas Carol' (30 marks)
How To Approach This Paper
Section A: fifty-five minutes
Section B: fifty minutes

Spend five minutes more on Section A because your SPaG is assessed for an extra four marks on this question.
Assessment Objectives
AO1: PEACE paragraphs
AO2: language, structure and form
AO3: context
AO4: SPaG (Section A only)
Closed Book Exam
To meet AO1, you will need to remember quotations from the texts.

This is why we've been practising for the last year or more.
Macbeth
Read the following question from Act 5 Scene 3 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows.
At this point in the play Macbeth is under siege from the English army.
Poor Response
Shakespear presents the idea that killing a king is wrong,
'Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return / To playgue the inventer'
this shows that he knows killing the king is wrong and
it will backfire on him
.
Your Turn
Now, attempt the 'heroism' question, ensuring that your response is developed, critical and perceptive.
Independent Attempt
On the next slide is one final question. This time, you are going to attempt to answer it alone.
Section A: 'Macbeth'
This section will contain questions on the following Shakespeare plays:
Macbeth
Romeo and Juliet
The Tempest
The Merchant of Venice
Much Ado About Nothing
Julius Caesar

Macbeth, Macbeth,
MACBETH!
Green Pen Marking
Take a green pen and underline where you have hit the four assessment objectives:
AO1: quotations and meaning (detailed and developed) from the extract and the rest of the text
AO2: analysis of language, structure and form and their effects on the reader
AO3: contextual comments, with quotations
AO4: SPaG (circle and correct errors)
Now, do the same with three of these quotations:
'let them fly all'
'Till Birnam wood remove to Dunsinane, I cannot taint with fear'
'What's the boy Malcolm? Was he not born of woman?'
‘Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman / Shall e’er have power upon thee.’
'Then fly, false thanes, / And mingle with the English epicures'
'The mind I sway by and the heart I bear / Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear'
'The devil damn thee black, thou cream-faced loon!'
'Where got’st thou that goose look?'
Paired Attempt
On the next slide is another question. Answer it independently, remembering to hit all four AOs:
AO1: PEACE paragraphs
AO2: language, structure and form
AO3: context
AO4 (Section A only)
Starting with this speech, explain how far you think Shakespeare presents Macbeth as a hero.
Write about:
how Shakespeare presents Macbeth in this speech
how Shakespeare presents Macbeth in the play as a whole.

[30 marks] AO4 [4 marks]
MACBETH
Bring me no more reports; let them fly all:
Till Birnam wood remove to Dunsinane,
I cannot taint with fear. What's the boy Malcolm? Was he not born of woman? The spirits that know All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:
‘Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman
Shall e’er have power upon thee.’ Then fly, false thanes,
And mingle with the English epicures:
The mind I sway by and the heart I bear
Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
(
Enter a Servant
)
The devil damn thee black, thou cream-faced loon!
Where got’st thou that goose look?
MACBETH
Bring me no more reports;
let them fly all
:
Till Birnam wood remove to Dunsinane,
I cannot taint with fear.
What's the boy Malcolm? Was he not born of woman? The spirits that know All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:

Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman
Shall e’er have power upon thee.’
Then fly, false thanes,
And mingle with the English epicures:
The mind I sway by and
the heart I bear
Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
(
Enter a Servant
)
The
devil damn thee black, thou cream-faced loon
!
Where got’st thou that goose look?
AO1: PEACE Paragraphs
AO1
AO2: Methods and Effects
‘Fear not, Macbeth;
no man that's born of woman
Shall e’er have power upon thee.’
Macbeth is reassuring himself that he has nothing to be afraid of.
Macbeth still thinks no one can kill him. He thinks he's untouchable
.

This isn't really heroic behaviour because heroes act bravely in the face of danger and he doesn't think there is a danger.
‘Fear not, Macbeth;
no man that's born of woman
Shall e’er have
power
upon thee
.’
Lang: imperative.
Lang: euphemism for the killing.
Structure: this was foreshadowed by the witches.
Macbeth is reminding the audience of their prophesy earlier in the play. This is because Macduff is about to re-enter the play.
AO3: Context
'‘Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman
Shall e’er have power upon thee.’
Context:
men were supposed to be the brave sex
knights were supposed to follow the 'chivalric code'
England was a very religious and superstitious country

Lang: Macbeth is reminding the audience of the witches' prophesy. He still thinks no one can kill him.
What's good?
Focuses on the question
Uses a well-selected quotation
Shows some basic understanding
What's missing?
No critical understanding
No comments on language, structure or form
No understanding of context
Lots of SPaG errors
Shakespear
e
presents the idea that killing a king is wrong
:
'Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return / To
plague
the invent
o
r'
.

T
his shows that he knows killing the king is wrong and it will backfire on him.
Better Response
Shakespeare uses this
soliloquy
to show the audience that Macbeth understands that regicide is wrong. The
metaphor

'Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return / To plague the inventor'
suggests that he fears the crime will come back to
'plague'
him. He fears that after Duncan's murder he will only have
'taught'
others that regicide is a route to success and, as he will then be the king, he would be any assassin's next target.
Back in Shakespeare's time, people were very religious and they believed in the 'divine right of kings', so killing Duncan would have been a terrible sin.

Later in the soliloquy, Macbeth then...
Best Response
With Duncan now in his castle and his wife pressuring him to fulfill the weird sisters' prophecy

('
look like the innocent flower, / But be the serpent under't
'), Shakespeare establishes Macbeth's
hamartia
in the soliloquy to show the audience that Macbeth understands that regicide is wrong,
yet we know he'll still go through with it
. The
violent

metaphor
'Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return / To plague the inventor' suggests that he fears the crime will come back to 'plague' him. He fears that after Duncan's murder he will only have 'taught' others that regicide is a route to success and, as he will then be the king, he would be any assassin's next target.
The year that Macbeth was first performed the year after the Gunpowder Plot, so it's it's clear that Shakespeare was being influenced by current events. It's even clearer that Shakespeare would present regicide as wrong because he would have been trying to curry favour with King James and reinforce the widely held belief in the 'divine right of kings'. Therefore, it's important that he presents the
tragic hero
Macbeth as being aware that killing Duncan will be his
nemesis
.

Later in the soliloquy, Macbeth then...
What's good?
Comments are well-argued and thoughtful
Picks out specific language from the quotation
Identifies features language and form
Shows clear understanding of the context
No SPaG errors
What's missing?
No understanding of the wider play and how this fits into it
There are no cross-referenced quotations
There would be even more sophisticated terms used for the language, structure and form
Contextual comments could be more perceptive
Showing Understanding of the Whole Play
From your own knowledge, where else in the play does Shakespeare present ideas about Macbeth's heroism?

Thinking time and then rally robin some idea.

Make a list of quotations that you have learned over the last two years.
Heroism/Cowardice
Act One Scene One: 'Fair is foul, and foul is fair.'
Act One Scene Two:
'Brave Macbeth, well he deserves that name.'
'Like Valour's minion carv'd out his passage/Till he faced the slave'
'Dismay'd not this our captains, Macbeth and Banquo? / 'Yes, as sparrows, eagles, or the hare, the lion.'
Act One Scene Five: ‘yet do I fear thy nature/It is too full o' the milk of human kindness/To catch the nearest way’
Act One Scene Seven:
‘I have no spur/To prick the sides of my intent, but only/Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself/And falls on the other.’
"We will proceed no further in this business/Was the hope drunk / Wherein you dress'd yourself? Hath it slept since? I dare do all that may become a man; / Who dares do more is none. / When you durst do it, then you were a man."
Act Five Scene Eight: 'Accursed be that tongue that tells me [you are not of woman-born] For it hath cow'd my better part of man! / Then yield thee, coward' / 'I throw my warlike shield. Lay on, Macduff, / And damn'd be him that first cries, "Hold, enough!"'
Model Answers
Let's examine how I hit the four AOs based on a question and extract we did earlier in the year.
AO1: quotations and meaning (detailed and developed) from the extract and the rest of the text
AO2: analysis of language, structure and form and their effects on the reader
AO3: contextual comments, with quotations
AO4: SPaG (circle and correct errors)
Macbeth
Read the following extract from Act 1 Scene 2 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows.
At this point in the play the Captain is reporting news of the battle to King Duncan.
Starting with this speech, explain how Shakespeare presents Macbeth as a tragic hero.
Write about:
how Shakespeare presents Macbeth in this speech
how Shakespeare presents Macbeth in the play as a whole.
[30 marks]
AO4 [4 marks]
Doubtful it stood;
As two spent swimmers, that do cling together
And choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald--
Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
The multiplying villanies of nature
Do swarm upon him--from the western isles
Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak:
For brave Macbeth--well he deserves that name--
Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel,
Which smoked with bloody execution,
Like valour's minion carved out his passage
Till he faced the slave;
Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him,
Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chaps,
And fix'd his head upon our battlements.
The Presentation of Macbeth
Act One Scene Two (extract in question)
Act One Scene Five (Lady Macbeth's soliloquies)
Act One Scene Seven (Macbeth's soliloquy and conversation with Lady Macbeth)
Act Two Scene One (Macbeth's soliloquy)
Act One Scene Two (the immediate effects on Macbeth)
Act Three Scene One (Banquo's soliloquy)
Act Three Scene Four (dinner's ruined)
Act Five Scene Five (Lady Macbeth's final sin)
Act Five Scene Eight (Macbeth's comeuppance)
Macbeth
Read the following extract from Act 1 Scene 5 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows.
At this point in the play Lady Macbeth is speaking to Macbeth about King Duncan.
Starting with this speech, explain how Shakespeare presents the idea of false appearances.
Write about:
how Shakespeare presents false appearances in this speech
how Shakespeare presents false appearances in the play as a whole.
[30 marks]
AO4 [4 marks]
O, never
Shall sun that morrow see!
Your face, my thane, is as a book where men
May read strange matters. To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under't. He that's coming
Must be provided for: and you shall put
This night's great business into my dispatch;
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
False Appearances
Act One Scene One (the weird sisters)
Act One Scene Two (first impressions of Macbeth)
Act One Scene Three (Macbeth meets the weird sisters)
Act One Scene Five (Lady Macbeth's soliloquies)
Act One Scene Seven (Macbeth's soliloquy and conversation with Lady Macbeth)
Act Two Scene One (Macbeth's soliloquy)
Act Four Scene One (the weird sisters' final prophecies)
Act Five Scene Five (Macbeth's reaction to the English army)
Act Five Scene Eight (Macbeth's comeuppance)
Final Exam Challenge
Complete the grid hitting all three AOs.
Write a detailed, developed response to the question on the board.
Additional challenge:
cross-reference with quotations from memory
offer personal interpretations
work on your individual target

AOs:
AO1: quotations and meaning
AO2: methods and effects
AO3: contextual factors
Full transcript