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Euclidean Geometry; Mr.Pierce, 9th

This Prezi Presentation explains what Euclidean Geometry is and how we use it in our everyday life.

Trevor McMahan

on 1 September 2010

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Transcript of Euclidean Geometry; Mr.Pierce, 9th

Double click anywhere & add an idea Euclid was one of the world's greatest Greek geometrician! How do we use Euclidean Geometry? Euclidean Geometry Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system attributed to the Alexandrian Greek mathmatician Euclid, whose Elements is the earliest known sysematic discussion of geometry. We use Euclidean Geometry everyday. It's the most common of all geometry. Architecture, civil engineering, and like-minded designing is based on Euclidean Geometry.
Here are a few examples of Euclidean Geometry: The Butterfly Theorem Apollonius Triangle THANK YOU FOR WATCHING! The 5 Postulates: A straight line segment can be drawn joining any two points. Any straight line segment can be extended indefinitely in a straight line. Given any straight line segment, a circle can be drawn having the segment as radius and one end point as center. All right angles are congruent. If 2 lines are drawn which intersect a 3rd in such a way that the sum of the inner angles on one side is less than 2 right angles, then the 2 lines inevitably must intersect each other on that side if extended far enough. Sources:
hi By: Trevor McMahan
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