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Chapter 9: Policy Outcomes

Sociology 211
by

Nini Salazar

on 15 April 2013

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Transcript of Chapter 9: Policy Outcomes

In-Class Exercise for Ch. 9 In groups:

- Discuss 2 “Box” sections and be prepared to share details with the class
Connect to concepts, highlight interesting points, etc…
- Discuss the Case Study; Answer the 3 questions on page 285


* * Record notes in your own notebook in preparation * *
* * for class lecture/discussion * * New Claims based on Policy Evaluations Actors, Evidence, and Evaluation Chapter 9: Policy Outcomes * * Refer to Figure 9.1 on page 265 * *
“One Social Problems Process Can Inspire Others”

Critique #1 – Insufficient Policy (goes too far)
Critique #2 – Excessive Policy (doesn’t go far enough)
Critique #3 – Misguided Policy (wrong direction) Critics of Policies include:
- Social Problems Workers
- Subjects
- Initial Activists and Experts promoting the policy
- Rival Activists and Experts opposing the policy
- Other Policymakers
Evidence
- Critics draw on anecdotal (typifying examples, stories) and statistical evidence, experiential knowledge, and ideological and conceptual frameworks. Joel Best. (2013). “Social Problems Work.” Social Problems, Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. Pp. 255-285. Box Sections and Case Study for Ch. 9 - Box 9.1: Alcohol, Risks, and Pregnancy (p. 260)

- Box 9.2: When Should Pathologists Identify Abuse as a Cause of
Death (p. 263)

- Box 9.3: Holding Colleges Accountable for Crimes on Campus
(p. 268)

- Box 9.4: Do Sex Offender Policies Work? (p. 274)

- Box 9.5: Commissions Explain Disasters (p. 277)

- Box 9.6: Participation as an Outcome of Social Programs (p. 281)

- Case Study: Technological Change and Policy Outcomes
(p. 283-285) Policy Outcomes Policy Outcomes: reactions to policies and the ways that social problems workers have implemented policies

Reactions range from satisfied to unsatisfied

Reactions to most policies fall between the extremes, where flawed policies have both satisfactory and unsatisfactory elements. Wording ‘Social Problems’ Social Conditions: social circumstances or arrangements (structure and culture)

Troubling Conditions: conditions of social concern that become the subject of claims

Social Issues: topics of social concern that are characterized by disagreement or debate

Social Problems: topics of social concern characterized by the need for a solution Case Study: Technological Change and Policy Outcomes What sorts of warrants do competing claimsmakers offer when debating intellectual property issues?

Why have cell phone inspired so many policy debates?

What is another example of a technological change affecting how people think about policy outcomes? Ideological Predispositions Ideology: a system of beliefs regarding how society does and should operate
- Predisposes us to certain responses to policy outcomes
Rhetorical link between Ideology and Interests
- Ideologies support principled arguments and claims of righteousness
- People frequently adopt ideologies that support their interests
Ideologies and interests inform practical and moral questions in policy debates and evaluations of policy outcomes Box 9.6: Participation as an Outcome of Social Programs (p. 281) - Based on wrong view of condition or wrong principles- Improperly implemented by social problems workers- IRONIC consequences (INADVERTENT causal story) Box 9.1: Alcohol, Risks, and Pregnancy (p. 260)
Box 9.2: When Should Pathologists Identify Abuse as a Cause of Death (p. 263) Box 9.3: Holding Colleges Accountable for Crimes on Campus (p. 268) The Search for Impartial Evaluations Evaluation Research: a social scientific assessment of the effectiveness of a specific policy

Commissions: special, high-status groups – often created at the national level – that evaluate policies and issue recommendations Box 9.4: Do Sex Offender Policies Work? (p. 274)
Box 9.5: Commissions Explain Disasters (p. 277)
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