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Cry , The Beloved Country.

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by

Carolina Gómez Roca

on 19 April 2010

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Transcript of Cry , The Beloved Country.

CHARACTERS Is an elderly Zulu priest who has spent all of his life in the village of Ndotsheni. AUTHOR Alan Paton was born on January 11, 1903 in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. After graduation from Maritzburg College in 1918, he studied at the University of Natal. Even early in his career Paton took a strong interest in race relations, joining the South African Institute of Race Relations in 1930. In 1942 he is nominated to the Angelican Diocesan Commission to inquire into church and race relations in South Africa. SETTING Stephen Kumalo Cry, the Beloved Country is set in the rural village of Ndotsheni, home of Stephen Kumalo, and in the city of Johannesburg. He is a quiet, humble, and gentle man with a strong moral sense and an abiding faith in God. Theophilus Msimangu Stephen Kumalo’s host and guide in Johannesburg. A tall, young minister at the Mission House in Sophiatown, Msimangu has an acute understanding of the problems that face South Africa. Absalom Kumalo Stephen Kumalo’s son Gertrude Kumalo Stephen Kumalo’s sister and the original reason for his trip to Johannesburg. Cry, The Beloved Country EVENTS The book begins describing the intense natural beauty of this rural South African landscape, then hinting that, when one enters the hills, the beauty breaks down. Then a small child run’s to the Reverend Kumalo holding a letter in her hands. He is reluctant to open the letter. It is from Johannesburg, where three of his close relatives have gone, never to be heard from again.
It is from the Reverend Theophilus Msimangu, who writes that Gertrude (his sister) is very sick. He assures Kumalo that he will find him a place to stay in Johannesburg, and urges him to come. Finally, they decide that they will use the money they were saving to send Absalom to school for the trip instead. He waits for a train with a friend, who timidly asks him for a favor on behalf of a man named Sibeko. Kumalo tells him that he will help anyone in their community, no matter what their religion might be. When they finally get there, Kumalo is terrified. The city is huge, and the countless neon lights are too much for him to understand. He cannot figure out how to cross the street. Msimangu tells Kumalo that he can stay with Mrs. Lithebe, a kind woman who will charge him cheap rent. After dinner, Msimangu privately tells Kumalo Gertrude's story. Kumalo is shocked. 1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 4. 6. 8.
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