Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Halogens

No description
by

Becca Zagorski

on 18 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Halogens

Halogens

Halogens
Halides
A halide is formed when a halogen combines with another element resulting in a compound. The most common example of a halide is NaCl.

The Elements
Group 17
Seven valence electrons
High electronegativities
Very reactive
Particularly reactive with Alkali and Alkali-Earth metals
All exist as diatomic molecules
Relation
Reactivity and Charges
Chlorine (Cl)
Atomic Number: 17
Atomic Weight: 35.45 amu
Greenish-yellow gas
Very reactive (Combines directly with nearly all elements)
Discovered in 1774
Melting Point: -101.5 degrees Celsius
Boiling Point: -29.27 degrees Celsius
Example reaction:
2Cl2 (s) + 2H20 (l) ------> 4HCl (aq) + O2 (g)

Interesting Facts:

Chlorine is a respiratory irritant.
Because of its reactivity, Chlorine is not found as a free state in nature, but it is found commonly as NaCl (solid or seawater).
Chlorine was used as a gas in WWII.
Some tree frogs have a chlorine compound in their skin that is a very powerful pain killer, 200 times more potent than any known pain killer. When used in small doses, this compound has no side effects. In large doses, it is fatal.
Bromine (Br)
Atomic number: 35
Atomic weight: 79.904 amu
State: liquid at 298 K [or 24.85 °C (76.63 °F)]
Group in periodic table: 17
Group name: Halogen
Period in periodic table: 4
Color: red-brown, metallic luster when solid
Classification: Non-metallic
Melting point: 265.8 [or -7.3 °C (19 °F)] K
Boiling points of the chemical elements displayed on a miniature periodic tableBoiling point: 332 [or 59 °C (138 °F)] K
As you go down the group of 17, the atomic radius gets bigger due to an extra filled electron shell.

Halogen containing organic compounds are relatively rare in terrestrial plants and animals. The halogen rich environment of the ocean has produced many interesting natural products incorporating large amounts of halogen. Some examples are shown below.
The ocean is the largest known source for atmospheric methyl bromide and methyl iodide. Furthermore, the ocean is also estimated to supply 10-20% of atmospheric methyl chloride, with other significant contributions coming from biomass burning, salt marshes and wood-rotting fungi. Many subsequent chemical and biological processes produce poly-halogenated methanes.
2Br- + Cl2 ---> 2Cl- + Br2

F
luorine(F)
Atomic Number:9
Atomic Weight: 18.99 amu
Pale, yellow gas
Most electronegative
Most reactive of all the elements
Discovered in France in 1886 by Henri Moissan
Melting Point: -219.62 degrees Celsius
Boiling Point: -188.12 degrees Celsius

Interesting Facts:
Found in nature as calcium fluoride CaF which forms crystals. There are two calcium fluoride deposits in Alaska and Argentina.


Fluorine is also soluble in water which prevents cavities.
Astatine (At)
Name: Astatine
Atomic number: 85
Atomic weight: 210 amu
Standard state: solid at 298 K [or 24.85 °C (76.63 °F)]
Group in periodic table: 17
Group name: Halogen
Period in periodic table: 6
Block in periodic table: p-block
Color: metallic
Classification: Semi-metallic
Melting point: 575 [or 302 °C (576 °F)] K
Boiling points: boiling point: 503 [or 230 °C (446 °F)] K
Astatine is radioactive and essentially unavailable in nature. It is not possible to make it outside of a nuclear reactor.
Iodine (I)
Group: 17
Period: 5
Atomic #: 53
State: Solid at room temperature
Appearance: black shiny crystals
Discovery: Bernard Courtois in 1811
Etymology: from the greek "Iodes" (violet).
Melting Point: 113.7*C
Boiling Point: 184.4*C
Uses:
used in dyes and photography (development aid)
Iodine in sea water is responsible for a purple-red color of sea weed.
Bombardment of the bismuth isotope 20983Bi with α-particles (helium nuclei, 42He) results in formation of shortlived astatine and neutrons. The bismuth target is cooled during irradiation to prevent the volatile astatine disappearing.
Halogens are located in Group VII of the periodic table and are non metals.
Etymology: the name Halogens is derived from two Greek roots: "hal-" (salt) and "gen-" (formers)
Atomic Radii increase down the group
Ionization energy increases down the group
Electronegativity decreases down the group
Electron affinity decreases down the group
Halogens are used in everything from toothpaste (SnF2) to uranium fuel for nuclear reactors (UF6)

Help!
I need an electron
Help!
Just need one electron
Help!
You know I need just one
Help!

We're Fluorine, Chlorine, Bromine,And Iodine
We're hanging out by noble gases
All the time
We're pretty needy
And we're acting all unstable
Just wishing we were group 8
On the periodic table

Help us if you can, we're feeling down
We'd appreciate one more electron 'round
Eight valence electrons make us sound
Won't you please help me?

Hey , thank you Sodium
For coming by and caring
I grabbed your outer electron;
I'm no good at sharing
Still you can stand in front of me
In formulas
Admit it, you're more positive with me because

I have your electron; that is true
And my outer shell is filled because of you
But you look like a noble gas, too
You helped me and I helped you

We're Fluorine, Chlorine, Bromine,
And Iodine
We're hanging out by noble
Gases all the time
We're pretty needy
And we're acting all unstable
Just wishing we were group 8
On the periodic table

Help us if you can, we're feeling down
We'd appreciate one more electron 'round
Eight valence electrons make us sound
Won't you please help me?
Help me
Help me ooooh
Halogens are EVERYWHERE!
amu
Full transcript