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Cow to carton by jack

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by

Elizabeth Harris

on 20 November 2015

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Transcript of Cow to carton by jack

Step 1: Cows grazing
Typically cows spend about 8 hours eating, 8 hours sleeping and 8 hours Munching or chewing their cud (Grass). Cows are usually provided with a fresh paddock of grass in the morning after milking and another fresh paddock of grass in the evening after milking.
Step 3: Storing milk
Milk storage vats or silos are refrigerated and come in various shapes and sizes. Milk is stored on farm at 4 degrees Celsius and less for no longer than 48 hours. Vats and silos are agitated to make sure that the entire volume remains cold and milk fat does not separate from the milk. After milk has been collected, storage vats and stainless steel pipes are thoroughly cleaned before the farmer milks again.
Step 4: Transporting milk
Milk is collected from the farm every 24 or 48 hours. The tankers that are used have a special stainless steel body which are heavily insulated to keep the milk cold during transportation to the processing factory. Milk tanker drivers are accredited milk graders, which allows them to evaluate the milk prior to collection.
Step 5: Labortary testing
Step 6:PROCESSING MILK
Whole milk, once approved for use, is pumped into storage silos where it undergoes Pasteurization (kills bacteria), Homogenization and further processing.
Pasteurization is performed for two reasons;
1. Ensure all milk products are safe for human consumption by destroying all bacteria that may be harmful to health. 2. Improve the keeping quality of milk by killing or inactivating some undesirable enzymes and spoilage bacteria.
Step 2: Harvesting milk
Cows are normally milked 2 times per day, however some high producing herds are milked 3 times per day. Normally cows are milked at about 6 am in the morning and again at about 5 pm in the evening. Milking time takes about 5 minutes per cow but depends on the type of machine and the amount of milk the cow is producing.
Cow to carton
Samples of milk are taken from farm vats prior to collection and from the bulk milk tanker on arrival at the factory. Samples from the bulk milk tanker are tested for antibiotic and temperature before the milk enters the factory processing area. Farm milk samples are tested for milk fat/protein/bulk milk cell count and bacteria count.
Step6:DistributISTRIBUTING AND SELLING MILK
Step 7: Distributing and selling and selling
Then milk is sent off in refrigerated trucks, to your favourite store for sale!
The milking machine is a nearly automatic machine installation for milking cows. It is not a single unit, but rather an assembly of components designed to handle as many as 200 cows an hour. The system consists of the cluster (the assembly that is manually attached to the cow), a milk tube, a pulse tube and pulsator, a vacuum pump or blower, and perhaps a recorder jar or milk meter that measures yield. Together, the system allows milk to flow into a pipeline in preparation for shipping to a processing plant.

Read more: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-2/Milking-Machine.html#ixzz3ru6Gaqsm

Milking machine
The milking machine is a nearly automatic machine installation for milking cows. It is not a single unit, but rather an assembly of components designed to handle as many as 200 cows an hour. The system consists of the cluster (the assembly that is manually attached to the cow), a milk tube, a pulse tube and pulsator, a vacuum pump or blower, and perhaps a recorder jar or milk meter that measures yield. Together, the system allows milk to flow into a pipeline in preparation for shipping to a processing plant.
History of milking machine
Early attempts at milking cows involved a variety of methods. Around 380 B.C. , Egyptians, along with traditional milking-by-hand, inserted wheat straws into cows' teats. Suction was first used as a basis for the mechanized harvesting of milk in 1851, although the attempts were not altogether successful, drawing too much blood and body fluid congestion within the teat. To encourage further innovations, the Royal Agricultural Society of England offered money for a safe, working milking machine. Around the 1890s Alexander Shiels of Glasgow, Scotland, developed a pulsator that alternated suction levels to successfully massage the blood and fluids out of the teat for proper blood circulation. That device, along with the development of a double-chambered teatcup in 1892, led to milking machines replacing hand milking. After the 1920s machine milking became firmly established in the dairy industry. Today, the majority of all milking is processed by machine.
Before
Now
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