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Exploring Our Solar System

Group 1 - COM10003
by

Sam Ryall

on 17 May 2015

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Transcript of Exploring Our Solar System


INTRODUCTION
THE SUN
* Mars, known as a Terrestrial planet, is the fourth planet from the Sun (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
MARS
* Earth is the third planet from the sun, approximately 150 million kilometres from it (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

*The Earth's surface is made up of 70% ocean, the rest is mountains, valleys, canyons and plains (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
EARTH
* Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun, approximately 778 million kilometres from it (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).


JUPITER
* Saturn is the sixth planet from the sun, approximately 1.4 billion kilometres from it (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* It has seven rings with several gaps and divisions between them (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
SATURN
History
* 4.6 billion years ago, a 480 000 billion kilometre -230c “Cloud” of gas existed.

* Known as the solar nebula, it accelerated speed and collapsed due to gravity.

* Most of the materials were drawn into the helium core, creating the sun through fusion.

* The sun is made up of hydrogen and helium (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* The visible surface, known as the photosphere, has a temperature of approximately 5,500 degrees Celsius. At the core, the temperature is approximately 15 million degrees Celsius (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

Distance
* Each planet ellipses around the sun, meaning distances are constantly changing depending on each planet’s location in orbit (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* Earths average distance to the sun is 1 astronautical unit (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

Scale
* The sun is so big it could fit Earth 109 times across its 1.4 billion kilometre surface (National Geographic Society, 2015).

* If it was hollow it could fit more than a million Earths inside it (National Geographic Society, 2015).

Distance

*Earth is positioned between Venus and Mars respectively and on average half an astronomical unit apart (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
History
* According to the widely accepted theory of Proto Planetary Hypothesis, a cloud of dust and gases rotated as a system of vortexes dividing to form planets, including Earth.
Scale
* Earth is the fifth largest planet, with a diameter a few hundred kilometres bigger than Venus' (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* If the Sun was a 2.5m inflatable ball, Earth would be a 2.3cm marble (Scherrer).
Distance
* Mars is on average 1.5 astronomical units from the sun (Sharp, 2012).

* Mars’ average temperature is significantly lower than Earth’s due to distance from the Sun (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Composition
* The solid surface has been altered over time by dust storms, craters, crustal movement and volcanoes (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* Consisting of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and argon, the atmosphere is very thin (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
History
* Mars was formed approximately 4.6 billion years ago from 1-3% of material or matter that was leftover from the sun's creation.


Distance
* Jupiter's magnetosphere expands approximately 1.5 to 3 million kilometres to the sun and more than 1 billion Kilometres in arrears of the planet (National Geographic, Jovian Giant, 2015).

* Earth and Jupiter’s closest point during orbit is 588 million kilometres (3.92 Astronomical units), the farthest 968 million kilometres (National Geographic, Jovian Giant, 2015).
History
* It is believed a planetoid 10 times larger than Earth, which collected gases over a period of 10 million years, is responsible for the formation of Jupiter.
Composition
* Jupiter’s atmosphere is composed of hydrogen and helium (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* It is unknown what lies at Jupiter's core (Nettlemann, 2011).

* Scientists believe it may have a small solid core with a liquid hydrogen layer surrounding it that swirls creating a very powerful magnetic field (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Scale
* The largest planet in our solar system is Jupiter (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* If Jupiter was the size of a basketball, the Sun would be the size of a regular front door (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Scale
* If Mars was the size of a Panadol, Earth would be a five cent piece, Jupiter and Saturn basketballs and the Sun the size of an average front door (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Distance
* Saturn sits at a distance of about 1.4 billion kilometres or 9.5 AU from the sun (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* It has an equatorial diameter recorded at 120,536 kilometres, about 9.5 times larger than Earth’s (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Scale
* Using the Astronomical Unit Model, Earth is 1cm from the Sun, Mars is 1.5cm, Jupiter is 5cm and Saturn is 9.5cm (Eicher, 2014).
History
* It is the second largest planet.

* A solar wind swept away lighter elements, leaving heavier materials. Further away solar winds had less impact and gases began to clamp together into giants, including Saturn.
Composition
* As with Jupiter and the Sun, Saturn is also made mostly of hydrogen and helium (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Composition
* Earth’s atmosphere is made up of approximately 80% nitrogen, the remainder consisting of oxygen and a few other constituents (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).
Introduction
References
This presentation is the result of an online collaboration using credible and reliable resources. Metzger's literature was relied upon to assess the credibility and reliability of the online sources referred to. In particular, authority, objectivity, coverage, accuracy and currency were used as a checklist to ensure reliable, credible and up to date information is presented (Metzger, 2007).

Conclusion
Composition
Deborah Scherrer. (2014). Solar System Scale Model. Stanford Solar Center. Retrieved April 28, 2015, from
http://solar-center.stanford.edu/activities/ScaleModel/Scale-Model-Instructions.pdf

Eicher, D. J. 2014. The Cosmic Distance Scale. Astronomy, 42 (11). Retrieved from database: Australia/New Zealand Reference Centre.

Metzger, M.J. (2007). Making sense of credibility on the web: Models for evaluating online information and recommendations for future research.
Journal Of The American Society For Information Science & Technology,
58(13), 2078-2091.

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 29, 2015 from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Earth

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 29, 2015 from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Jupiter

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from http://mars.nasa.gov/allaboutmars/facts/#?c=theplanet&s=composition

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 29, 2015, from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Mars

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 29, 2015, from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Saturn

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 29, 2015, from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Sun

NASA Solar System Exploration. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Sun&Display=OverviewLong

National Geographic Society. (2015). Earth. Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://science.nationalgeographic.com.au/science/space/solar-system/earth.html.

National Geographic Society. (2015). Sun. Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://science.nationalgeographic.com.au/science/space/solar-system/sun-article.html

National Geographic, Jovian Giant, 2015 - http://science.nationalgeographic.com.au/science/space/solar-system/jupiter-article/

Nettlemann, N. (2011). Predictions on the Core Mass of Jupiter and of Giant Planets in general.
Astrophysics and Space Science
, 366(1), pp.47-51.

Tim Sharp- How Far Away is Mars - 2012 - http://www.space.com/16875-how-far-away-is-mars.html

Music: Torrence Griffen, Youtube Licence, Nov 30, 2008

Figure 1 : Our Solar System - solarsystem.nasa.gov, Retrieved on 4 May, 2015

Figure 2 : Flare that Peaked - http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/665490main_20120705_114522-orig_full.jpg . Retrieved 14 May, 2015

Figure 3 : Birth of our Solar System - National Geographic YouTube Channel - Retrieved 28 April, 2015

Figure 4: True Colors of Jupiter - http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Jupiter - Retrieved 14 May, 2015

Figure 5 : Space Exploration - http://marshall.org/space-policy-tags/space-exploration-2/ - Retrieved 12 May, 2015

Figure 6 : Milky Way HD - https://newevolutiondesigns.com/30-super-hd-space-wallpapers - Retrieved 12 May, 2015

Figure 7 : Space Shuttle - http://wallpapers111.com/space-shuttle-wallpapers/ - Retrieved 12 May, 2015

Figure 8 : Space - http://wallpapers111.com/space-shuttle-wallpapers/ - Retrieved 12 May, 2015

Figure 9 : Earth - http://solarviews.com/eng/earth.htm - Retrieved 14 May, 2015

Figure 10 : Private Mars Voyage - http://www.space.com/19982-private-mars-mission-gallery-inspiration.html - Retrieved 14 May, 2015

Figure 11 : Saturn's Rings - http://www.space.com/19982-private-mars-mission-gallery-inspiration.html - Retrieved 14 May, 2015
Team One presents an online collaboration on our solar system. Using one of Metzger’s checklists we found up to date, factual information from trustworthy sites on the composition of the solar system and a number of its components (Metzger, 2007).
Exploring Our Solar System
by Lisa Ricketts, Samantha Ryall, Sandra Barnfield, Megan Dunn, Toplica Mihajlovic
* The sun is a star (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

* At the equator, it spins once every 25 Earth days. At The Poles it rotates once on its axis every 36 days (NASA Solar System Exploration, 2014).

Figure 1: Our Solar System
Figure 2 : Flare that Peaked
Figure 3 : Birth of Our Solar System
Figure 4: True Colors of Jupiter
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 5: Space Exploration
Figure 6: Milky Way HD
Figure 6: Milky Way HD
Figure 6: Milky Way HD
Figure 6: Milky Way HD
Figure 6: Milky Way HD
Figure 7: Space Shuttle
Figure 7: Space Shuttle
Figure 7: Space Shuttle
Figure 7 : Space Shuttle
Figure 7 : Space Shuttle
Figure 8 : Space

Figure 8 : Space
Figure 8 : Space
Figure 8 : Space
Figure 9 : Earth
Figure 10 : Private Mars Voyage
Figure 11: Saturn's Rings
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