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Neuromancer

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by

Drew Rideout

on 22 January 2014

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Transcript of Neuromancer

First Published
Neuromancer was first published on July 1st, 1984. It was published with a company known as 'Ace Science Fiction'
William Gibson
William Gibson is a American-Canadian author that was born on March 17th, 1948 in Conway, South Carolina. When Gibson was 19 he left the United States in fear of being drafted for the Vietnam War. It was when he settled in British Columbia that began writing his science-fiction novels. He has published works such as 'Neuromancer' and 'Mona Lisa Overdrive'. His most recently published novel is called 'Zero History'. Gibson is best know for his first book 'Neuromancer' but is also attriubed to coining the term 'cyberspace', some also call him the 'father of Cyberpunk'. In Gibson's novel 'Neuromancer' he created a world that, in retrospect, looks a lot like the internet does now.
Main Characters
Case: the main character in the novel. He is a drug addict and hacker.

Armitage: a former Colonel who recruits Case to do his bidding.

Molly: a 'Razorgirl' who was also recuited by Armitage.

Wintermute: an AI that wishes to combine with Neuromancer and become a stable super-intelligence.

Neuromancer: an AI that is considered Wintermute's sibling and unlike Wintermute, doesn't wish to combine as it already has a stable personality.
Neuromancer
Theme
In Neuromancer Gibson imagines a world where man and machine begin to become increasingly involved with one another. Not only are people taking on machine-like qualities, but machines are becoming more and more conscience and aware. This naturally creates conflict as the AIs wish to become indepented of the humans for varying reasons.
WWWsss
Personal Experiences
Unfortunately there are not any games provide this level of immersion...we don't have a Matrix (yet, fingers crossed). This book has the same futuristic ideas as The Matrix and Blade Runner do, maybe some Tron-like elements, but it's still completely orignial.
Media Tie-ins
The first two chapters of Neuromancer were made into a graphic novel.

Neuromancer has been addaptied into a video game, which recieved generally positive reviews from critics.

Unabridged audio books have been created from the novel.

A movie script has apprently been completed for 'years' but has yet to be produced by anyone.

An opera version of Neuromancer was set to premier in March of 1995, but as of 2013 the full show has yet to be preformed in full.
"Neuro from the nerves, the silver paths. Romancer. Necromancer. I call up the dead."
Original 20th Anniversary
My Book!!
------->
“Cyberspace. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts... A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding...”

William Gibson, Neuromancer
Quote

Setting
The novel takes place in a few futuristic different settings most importantly, cyberspace.

The novel also bring us to places like Japan, BAMA (a mega city that runs from Boston to Altanta) and Istanbul.
The land BAMA would cover (left)
Istanbul (right)
Point of View
This novel is writen the the third person point of view. To the right there is a extract showing this point of view.
The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel. "It's not like I'm using," Case heard someone say, as he shouldered his way through the crowd around the door of the Chat. "It's like my body's developed this massive drug deficiency." It was a Sprawl voice and a Sprawl joke. The Chatsubo was a bar for professional expatriates; you could drink there for a week and never hear two words in Japanese. Ratz was tending bar, his prosthetic arm jerking monotonously as he filled a tray of glasses with draft Kirin. He saw Case and smiled, his teeth a web work of East European steel and brown decay. Case found a place at the bar, between the unlikely tan on one of Lonny Zone's whores and the crisp naval uniform of a tall African whose cheekbones were ridged with Joe boys," Ratz said, shoving a draft across the bar with his good hand. "Maybe some business with you, Case?" Case shrugged.

Extract from the First paragraph of Neuromancer by William Gibson
Personal Summary
Neuromancer is the story about a man know as Case (a drug addict and former hacker) who gets a chance to hack again. He takes this chance, despite not fulling trusting the man (known as Armitage) who presents him this offer. Along the way he meets Molly who is even more suspicious of Armitage and it soon becomes apparent that Armitage does indeed have ulterior motives. Armitage works for Wintermute, and AI (artifical inteligence) who wishes to be combined with it's sibling who is know as Neuromancer. Wintermute wants to combine to become a stable super-inteligence, Neuromancer is already stable, and because of this, doesn't want to combine with Wintermute.
Writer Style
Got a Question?
Feel free to ask me anytime, or visit Wikipedia, Sparknotes or Google for more information
Got A Question?
Feel free to ask me any time, or you can of course visit Sparknotes, Wikipedia, or even Google!
Thank you!!
My Big Question
The biggest question this book left in my head was intially 'What if this where to actually happen?' but that soon changed into quite simply 'When? When will this happen?' I think it's impossible to actually guess when something like this will actually happen but I think we could see computers that really think for themselves within most of our lifetimes...and that's a beautiful, scary thing.
Critical Appraisal
"There is no way to overstate how radical Gibson’s first and best novel was when it first appeared. He combined a shattered, neon-chased, postmodern cityscape — its inhabitants rendered demi-human by designer drugs, tattoos and rampant surgical body modifications — with his vision of a three-dimensional virtual landscape created by networked computers, through which bad-ass bandit hackers roam like high plains drifters. When one such hacker, Case, gets banned from this “cyberspace” — Gibson was among the first to use the word — he’ll do anything to get back in, including embarking on a near-suicidal cyber-assault on an all but unhackable artificial intelligence. Violent, visceral and visionary (there’s no other word for it), Neuromancer proved, not for the first or last time, that science fiction is more than a mass-market paperback genre, it’s a crucial tool by which an age shaped by and obsessed with technology can understand itself."

Time Magazine
Why I think you should read this book.
This book captures every single detail you could ever want from a science fiction novel, and because of that it is know to be one of the best sci-fi books ever. This novel isn't perfect, but it is damn close...it's becoming rarer and rarer to find a novel that seems to do so many things right. If you have ever thought of what the future might be like, you should consider reading Neuromancer. If you want to read about a future that we could be around any corner, beyond any sunrise, please, do yourself a favour and read this book. If you like Science-Fiction, read this book now, and thank me later.
William Gibson's writing style consists of mostly short sentences that focus on environment rather than character. Gibson creates his own futuristic slang for his novel Neuromancer and effectively puts it to use. Neuromancer uses dialogue to provide an insight into the characters attitude towards other characters.
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