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Subject Verb Agreement

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by

Chris Page

on 20 January 2015

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Transcript of Subject Verb Agreement

Subject Verb Agreement
Every sentence needs at least on subject and one verb. Subjects and verbs also need to agree with each other.
He
sits
alone.
He
sit
alone.
These two disagree about something.
This
subject
agrees with this
verb
.
Agrees about what?
About whether the
subject
is plural or singular
The
subject
,

"He," is singular, meaning that there is one, and only one, "He."
The
subject
, "He" is singular, but the
verb
, "sit," is plural: this will cause trouble.
Remember: singular means "one,"
and plural means "more than one."

Every
subject
is either singular or
plural.
Any time you write in the
"present tense," singular
subjects
need to have
singular
verbs
, and plural
subjects
need to have
plural
verbs
:

He
walks
-
They

walk
She

is
-
They

are
The only exceptions to this rule are when your
subject
is either "I" or "You":

He
is
tired -
I
am
tired -
You

are
tired
Pam

tells
her -
I

tell
her -
You

tell
her
It these guys don't get along, your sentence won't make sense.
One last thing to remember:
Sometimes, the
subject
and
verb
in a sentence will be separated by a
prepositional phrase
.
A
prepositional phrase
is a group of words that
starts with a
preposition
and ends with a noun.
prepositions
are words like :
to, from, for, after, before, in, out, at, of
When?
Where?
Which?
Prepositional phrases
often answer these questions.
She
ran
to the store.
They

ate
dessert
after dinner
.
I
bought
flowers
for my wife
.
Earthquakes

shake
the earth
from underground
.
There can also be prepositional phrases in between subjects and verbs.
Samuel

at the grocery store

makes
me laugh.
The
letter

from the DMV

contains
a change-of-address form.
Those
guys

at the movie theater

annoy
us
every time
.
*NOTE*
Plural
nouns
often end with an "
s
" or "
es
" to show that they are plural : truck
s
, dresse
s
, idea
s
, sister
s
, class
es

With
verbs
, the opposite is often true. Many singular verbs end with an "
s
" or an "
es
": run
s
, catch
es
, ask
s
, go
es
, care
s
, think
s
A good rule of thumb is to remember that, usually,
subjects
that end with "
s
" or "
es
" will have
verbs
that DO NOT end with "
s
" or "
es
," and vice-versa.
No matter how far apart they are in a sentence, subjects and verbs need to agree with each-other.
Let's keep everyone happy!
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