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Curriculum map: Number sense Grade 1-6

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by

Chi Le

on 28 April 2014

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Transcript of Curriculum map: Number sense Grade 1-6

Grade 6: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 6, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 1 000 000, decimal numbers to thousandths, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers;

solve problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers, and the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to thousandths,
using a variety of strategies;
• demonstrate an understanding of relationships involving percent, ratio, and unit rate.
Curriculum map: Number sense Grade 1-6
Grade 2: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 2, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100, and use concrete materials to represent fractions and money amounts to 100¢;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward to 200 and backwards from 50, using multiples of various numbers as starting points;
• solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of one- and two-digit whole numbers,
using a variety of strategies, and investigate multiplication and division.
Grade 3: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 3, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 1000, and use concrete materials to represent fractions and money amounts to $10;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by various numbers and from various starting points;
• solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single- and multi-digit whole numbers, using a variety of strategies,
and demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division.
Grade 4: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 4, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 10 000, decimal numbers to tenths, and simple fractions, and represent money amounts to $100;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by 0.1 and by fractional amounts;

solve problems involving the addition, subtraction,multiplication, and division of single- and multi-digit whole numbers
, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to tenths and money amounts, using a variety of strategies;
• demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number unit rates.
Grade 5: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 5, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100 000, decimal numbers to hundredths, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by 0.01;

solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategies;
• demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number rates.
Grade 1: Number Sense and Numeration
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 50, and use concrete materials to
investigate fractions and money amounts;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward to 100 and backwards
from 20;
• solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single-digit whole numbers, using a
variety of strategies.
my aha moment
I think one of the biggest challenges for math teachers is trying to modify his/her lessons for students who just "don't get it". When faced with this challenge myself, I often tend to use the curriculum documents to work backwards to see what aspects of the math curriculum that that student might have missed moving up from K-8. And because I've only ever taught grade 8 math, my practicums notwithstanding, I usually only have to go back 1 or 2 grade levels to figure what part of the curriculum that a particular student probably needs a refresher in.

In some extreme cases, I've have grade 8 students, who were also not modified or accommodated,
unable to calculate 5x5 in their heads and without a calculator.
In hindsight, using my curriculum map that I've created for this assignment, I now realize that,
OMG
, that kid probably has been struggling with math from at least grade 2, because that's when multiplication and division is first introduced! I think that having a thorough understanding of the math curriculum, where math teachers are at least aware of the curriculum expectations two grades below grade level, is essential to figuring out how to help our most needy kids.
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